Immigrant #26 Gelsomina Ferraro Ciocco ~ Pasta Company Treasurer and Mother of Biostatistician Dr. Antonio Ciocco

manifestamferraro
Gelsomina is the 3rd from the top on the Lombardia’s Manifest Snippet

Immigrant Gelsomina Ferraro Ciocco was born in 1884 in Naples and came through Ellis Island in 1904 with her mother, Filomena Napolitano, and siblings Angela Maria Ferraro Valerioti, Elena Ferraro Scarnecchia, and Carmine Ferraro, my great grandfather, when she was 19. She was the mother of well – known biostatistician Dr. Antonio Ciocco.  Like her mother and sisters, she didn’t speak English, and was detained for a simple reason.  Her father, Angelo Ferraro, was not on time to collect the women to take them to Brooklyn.  The passenger manifest was marked that she could read and write in her native tongue.  She was my great grand aunt and the only sibling of my great grandfather that we have a photo of.

GelsominaandAntonioCiocco
Gelsomina and son Antonio Ciocco in her 1921 U.S. Passport Application; yes, she looks like half of the females in the family

One year later Gelsomina was residing with her parents when they lived in Brooklyn.  By 1907, Angelo and Filomena had moved to Columbus, Ohio.  That is where Gelsomina likely met her future husband Angelo Michele (Michael) Ciocco.   They were married in early 1908 by Father Sovilla in St. John the Baptist Church.

GelsominaMarriage.PNG
Franklin County Marriage Certificate via Ancestry.

Michael (Angelo Michele) Ciocco was born at #289 Via Borga, Guardialfiera, Campobasso, Molise, Italy on May 30, 1883 to Antonio Ciocco, a pasta maker, and Rosaria D’Onofrio.  His birth record (#41) via Antenati.

Gelsomina’s son Antonio Ciocco was born May 1, 1908.  Michael was naturalized in 1916 in Franklin County, Ohio.

AngeloMicheleCiocco.PNG
Angelo Michele Ciocco’s 1921 Passport Application Photo

When Michel’s parents brought the family to America, they ran an Italian bakery in Columbus.  Michael worked there and was also able to graduate high school.

Gelsomina went by Jessie in “American.”  I was glad United States Passport Applications up to I think, 1925, are on Ancestry and we have those photos of Gelsomina, Antonio, and Michael from 1921.  It gave me a hint about where Gelsomina had lived in America up until that point.  She stated she lived in Brooklyn, Chicago, and Columbus.  Oh, and she was also apparently 5’5″!

Remember in 1908 she married Michael?  In 1910 Michael was living with his parents and working at their bakery with Gelsomina and son Antonio nowhere in sight.  So I wondered if she was living in Chicago because Michael’s passport application stated that he had only lived in Columbus since he came to America.  Could she have been living near my great grandfather, her brother, in Chicago?  Or near Angela Maria Ferraro Valerioti  her sister in Chicago?

Maybe Gelsomina was living with her parents in Columbus. Unfortunately, I couldn’t find them on the 1910 Census.  In 1912 she traveled to Naples with her parents and visited 22 Montesanto Naples.  There is a monastery on Montesanto today, although not at the same address.  When her mother Filomena passed away in Columbus in 1914, Gelsomina was the informant on her death record.

In 1920, Gelsomina was living with her husband according to the Federal Census.  She was the bookkeeper for his pasta business – Columbus Macaroni Company.

Gelsomina returned to Naples two more times in the 1920s.  The 1925 return passenger manifest showed Gelsomina and Michael lived at 101 Thompson Street in New York City.

In 1927 and 1928 I found Gelsomina and Michael in the Newark, NJ City Directory.  Gelsomina was the Treasurer of their company Ciocco Macaroni Company, Inc.

JessieTreasurer.PNG

Like Gelsomina’s sister Angela Maria’s husband Jerry Valerioti, Michael Ciocco appears on the letterhead of my great grandfather’s opera school, the International Grand Opera Association in Chicago.  Michael Ciocco was listed as “press agent.”

Michael Ciocco’s parents continued to have their Italian bakery business in Columbus while continuing to speak their native tongue, according to the census records I found on them, and nobody suffered for it.  Michael’s father passed in 1932 and his mother passed in 1936.

Dr. Antonio Ciocco – Gelsomina Ferraro’s Son

Gelsomina only had one child – Dr. Antonio Ciocco and he was extremely important to health research in Pennsylvania, if not to the nation.  To discover where Gelsomina and Michael went after retirement from pasta manufacturing, I had to search for information on my 1st cousin two times removed Dr. Antonio Ciocco.  By 1935, Gelsomina and Michael had moved to Baltimore Maryland, where they lived with their son Antonio who was employed by the Federal Government at the United States Department of Health as a statistician.

I found a newspaper article on newspapers.com stating that Antonio was the chief of the Hagerstown, Maryland Field Station of the U.S. Public Health Service.  They likely moved to Pittsburgh with Antonio, because, in 1957, Michael Ciocco passed away in Pittsburgh, and in 1958, Gelsomina Ferraro passed away outside of Pittsburgh in New Brighton, Beaver County.  Antonio was the informant on both death records and signed his name as Dr.

Gelsomina was laid to rest at St. Joseph’s cemetery in Columbus, Ohio, with her husband.

Dr. Antonio Ciocco held science degrees from the University of Naples and Johns Hopkins.  The latter was likely the reason for his previous Baltimore address.

Articles referencing Antonio’s work in Pittsburgh starting around 1950 fill newspapers.com.  He conducted many studies, including some on cancer statistics, and is most well-known for his study on the effects of pollution in Donora, Pennsylvania that was published in coordination with another researcher in 1948.  The deadly and historic wall of polluted fog is also called the Donora Smog. In four days in October 1948, it killed 20 people and is believed to be the cause of death for at least 5 others.

You can see some of Dr. Ciocco’s published works here on World Cat.

Other information is best summed up about him in his Pittsburgh Post-Gazette obituary dated January 6, 1972.  I am posting it below in chunks.

obit1obit2obit3

 

His mass of Christian burial was held at St. Paul’s Cathedral, Pittsburgh.  I found his Find-a-Grave memorial created by another user.  He is buried in Silver Spring, Maryland.

I tried finding information about Michael and Gelsomina’s pasta companies but I didn’t turn up anything.  The Campobasso ancestry of Angelo Michele Ciocco and his parents can very easily be traced on Antenati.

Who do you think Great Grand Aunt Gelsomina resembles the most?

My immigrant great grandfather has one more sister – Giovannina Ferraro.

Sources:

Ellis Island Passenger Ship Manifests

Antenati

U.S. Passport Applications via Ancestry

United States Federal Censuses

New York State Census, 1905

Columbus and Newark City Directories

Franklin County, Ohio Marriage Records

Franklin County, Ohio Birth Index

Pennsylvania Death Certificates via Ancestry

Cousin Cleonice, C. Ferraro’s Federal file

Wikipedia

Newspapers.com Subscription

United States Social Security Death Index

Find-a-Grave.com

My email: cinziarosagenealogy@comcast.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If Vito Barbarino and Angela Nicolino Are In Your Tree Twice It Means…Uh Oh

Talanico, San Felice a Cancello, Caserta, Campania – When Vito Barbarino and Angela Nicolino are appearing in your pedigree twice as your forebears, you know two people in your Ferraro ancestry must’ve been related.  It turns out that great great grandfather Immigrant #3 ~ Retired Army Captain and Merchant Angelo Ferraro‘s parents were related because Vito Barbarino and Angela Nicolino from Roccarainola are in his ancestry on both sides of his family.  They were his great great grandparents twice through their daughter Giulia Barbarino – the ancestress of Angelo’s mother Angela Maria Delle Cave and Giovanna Barbarino – the ancestress of Angelo’s father Francesco Antonio Ferraro.

Giulia and Giovanna Barbarino were sisters, both daughters of Vito Barbarino and Angela Nicolino.

 

GiuliaBarbarinop.33.1259SPA.1696Bapt
Baptism of Giulia Barbarino, 1696, San Pietro Apostolo, Talanico, San Felice a Cancello

 

This all makes the parents of Angelo Ferraro third cousins.

Vito Barbarino and Angela Nicolino began to appear in the Talanico, San Felice a Cancello’s San Pietro Apostolo’s church records around 1690, with the notation that they were from a parish of Roccarainola, which is about 5 miles from the ancestral town of Angelo’s parents, San Felice a Cancello.

What can be gleaned from the online church records from the Diocese of Acerra concerning the Barbarinos is that their son Giacomo Antonio was at one point contributing the largest amount of tomolo of grain in tithes to the parish of San Leonardo in San Felice a Cancello.  Tomolo is an old Southern Italian measurement.

You can see the from pedigree of both parents of Angelo that, yep Barbarino and Nicolino are indeed in each one.

AMDelleCavePedigreeFAFerraropedigree

Giulia Barbarino married Lorenzo Delle Cave in 1721.  Giovanna Barbarino married Leonardo De Lardo in 1716.  Descendants of both sisters married approximately 100 years later and had Angelo Ferraro.

So.  They were related.  At least they weren’t 1st cousins HA!

Sources:

San Pietro Apostolo, Diocese of Acerra

San Leonardo, Diocese of Acerra

San Felice a Cancello, Civil Records

cinziarosagenealogy@comcast.net

Back to the immigrants.  #26.

Today’s Anniversary: Bartolomeo Massimo Antonio Desiati “Cacciatore” and Angela Emmanuela Sacchetti Muffitti

PennePenne, Pescara ~ On this day in 1821 my 5th great grandparents Bartolomeo Massimo Antonio Desiati “Cacciatore” from Penne, Pescara and Angela Emmanuela Sacchetti Muffitti from Castelli, Teramo, were married in Penne.  As far as records go, it was a strange marriage.  Look at all of those last names confusing the situation.  He was 59 and she was 32.

I found that someone in Penne must’ve made an error on a previous record two years prior.  When my 5th great grandparents had my 4th great grandfather Sabatino in 1819 the civil records officer wrote that Emmanuela was: sua moglie legitima=his (Bartolomeo) legitimate wife.  Hmmmm….The alias Cacciatore Bartolomeo had inherited from his father and Angela Emmanuela’s Sopranome Muffitti also added to the confusion over this set of ancestors.  I couldn’t figure out if Bartolomeo was having children with two different Emmanuelas or what!

Desiati alias Cacciatore

My 5th great grandfather Bartolomeo Massimo Antonio Desiati Cacciatore was born in Penne in 1762.  When his father died in 1775, the priest referred to him in the church death book at San Giovanni Evangelista in Penne as “Luciano Desiati alias Cacciatore.”  His death record is here in the marriage processetti of Bartolomeo and Emmanuela on Antenati.  Cacciatore = Huntsman.  Either Luciano Desiati, or one of his ancestors, slay beasts with skill for food, or was given the alias for another reason we will probably never know.

Similarly, in 1831, after Bartolomeo had four more children with Emmanuela and died, the civil records officer wrote his name as “Bartolomeo Desiati Cacciatore” on his death record.   Morti #43 via Antenati.  Bartolomeo’s half-brother Berardino was also recorded on his death record as “Berardino Desiati Cacciatore.”

Sacchetti Sopranome Muffitti

The civil records in Penne told me that an Emmanuela Muffitti had a son with Bartolomeo Cacciatore in February 1821 shortly before he married a lady with another surname – my 5th great grandmother.  On July 18th of that year, Angela Emmanuela Sacchetti, born in Villa Bifiore, Castelli, Teramo in 1789, daughter of the deceased Altobrando Sacchetti and Domenica Petra Menei, married Bartolomeo Massimo Antonio Cacciatore civilly at town hall and in church at San Giovanni Evangelista in Penne!   I didn’t know if these Emmanuelas were the same yet.

The 1821 marriage record from Penne via Antenati.

I discovered after looking through more Penne records that Sacchetti and Muffitti weren’t common surnames in the town at all.   Following the finding of the rest of Bartolomeo’s and Emmanuela’s children, including the birth of the Bartolomeo’s last child when he was 64, and seeing Emmanuela’s surname switching back and forth between Muffitti and Sacchetti, I just figured Bartolomeo was ignorant of the fact that the civil records officer kept writing different things and she was likely the same woman.

Then, when I found my 4th great grandfather’s Sabatino’s marriage record to Antonia Oriani/Auriano, (daughter of Massimo Antonio Nicola Oriani/Auriano and Rosalinda Maddalena Mincarelli) in 1844, there was a notation regarding Emmanuela’s surname, since she was deceased.

Sabatino’s marriage to Antonia Oriani. #44 Matrimoni 1844 Penne. Please see page 2.

The marriage record stated on the second page that Muffitti wasn’t incorrect on previous records regarding Bartolomeo and Emmanuela, because “her surname was Sacchetti and Muffitti was the SOPRANOME.”  Apparently a Sopranome distinguishes between family branches in larger towns or can be a nickname.  I can find no perfect genealogical definition for a Sopranome.

One time I saw a Penne record say that Massei was a Sopranome.  Are my ancestors named Massei really using a Sopranome?  No clue and I can’t tell from the records available to me…  So for now this is the best I can do for a sopranome definition:

Sopranomemeaning
Thanks Google

 

Their Orphaned Children

Bartolomeo and Emmanuela died 10 months apart in 1831 and left their 5 children as orphans.  Sabatino was only 12.  Emmanuela was recorded as “Emmanuela Muffitti” on her death record.  I have been trying to track their children.  It is definitely a possibility they went to live with Desiati relatives in Penne.

I know for sure that Sabatino, my 4th great grandfather, their oldest, married my 5th great grandmother Antonia Oriani in Penne.  After she left him a widow in 1857, Sabatino moved his children to Farindola, and married a cousin of ours, a Sciarra.  Sabatino died in Farindola in 1899 and the records officer wrote his name as “Sabatino Cacciatore.”  His cousin Luigi died in Penne in 1912 as “Luigi Desiati Cacciatore.”

I cannot at this time establish a connection between the Desiati alias “Cacciatore” family and the Cacciatore families living in Penne at the same time as our Luciano, Bartolomeo, and Sabatino.  Maybe there is no connection at all…

I wonder how he earned the alias and what the Sopranome meant…

Pace. Alla prossima!

 

castelli
Castelli, Teramo

 

cinziarosagenealogy@comcast.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

My German Palatinate, Saarland, Lorraine, France, and Swiss Anabaptist Surname and Place Lists

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The German Palatinate

  • Nunschweiler: Leies/Lais/Layes/Leis/Leyes, Bold, Pfeiffer, Scheid (originated in Loutzviller, Moselle), Bauer, Burkhart, Conrad (originated in Schweyen, Moselle)
  • Knopp-Labach: Bold, Becker
  • Rodalben: Scheid (originated in Loutzviller, Moselle), Buchler, Becker, Wilhelm, Hauck, Bisser(in), Helfrich/Helferich/Helferig
  • Vinnigen: Hauck, Kolsch (originated in Moselle)
  • Leimen/Merzalben/Leiningen: Reber, Helfrich/Helferich/Helferig (in Leimen before and after the Thirty Years War according to 850 Jahre Leimen.  See also Die Helfriche)
  • Mauschbach: Conrad, Steu/yer, Pfeiffer, Kempf, Burkhart, Ziegler
  • Grosssteinhausen: Pfeiffer, Kempf, Schaefer, Engel
  • Leichelbingen (Monbijou): Ziehl
  • Hornbach: Ziehl
  • Beidershausen: Stuppi/y, Muller, Rubli
  • Niedershausen: Stuppi
  • Oberhausen: Rubly/Rubli, Schwartz, Leyies/Leies/Layes/Leyies-Trauden/Traudi
  • Bechhofen: Rubli
  • Zweibrucken: Schwartz
  • Weisbach: Leies
  • Contwig: Leyies/Leies/Leyies-Trauden/Leyies-Traudi/Traudi, Rubeli
  • Messerschwanderhof: Rubeli

I share DNA with the descendants of the Hauck family and Helfrich family that emigrated to Pennsylvania before the Revolution. 

Anyone in America that has the surname Leies in their tree and has ancestors that immigrated to NYC and Wooster, Ohio is my DNA cousin.  They can all be traced back to Wenceslaus Layes-Trauden who lived the Zweibrucken area in the 1690s.  His origin is unknown. 

Please see this former post on the ancestry of Emilia Bold from Nunschweiler who descends from the Hauck, the Helfrich, and several Moselle and Pfalz millers: Immigrant #24 ~~ Great Great Grandmother Emilia Anna Bold Leies~~

 

Saarland*

  • Saarbrucken: Kempf, Ludt, Hufflinger
  • Burbach: Gans, Hufflinger

*My Kempf ancestors from Grosssteinhausen, RP are possibly descended from the Saarbrucken Kempfs in the Saarland.  I am working to prove descendancy from the Bailiff Hufflinger who lived in Saarbrucken in the 1400s which French researchers on Geneanet seem to think is a possibility.

 

Moselle, Lorraine, France

  • Loutzviller: Bittel, Scheid(t), Conrad
  • Schweyen: Conrad, Stauder
  • Volmunster: Bittel, Ziegler, Stauder, Stauder dit Le Suisse
  • Haspelscheidt: Fabing/Faber
  • Sarreguemines: Bittel
  • Roppeviller: Schaub dit Bittel
  • Bliesbruck: Stauder dit Le Suisse
  • Leiderschiedt: Weyland
  • Urbach: Faber, Champion (origin possibly Picardie, France)
  • Petit-Rederching: Faber, Faber dit Schoff Jockel
  • Bitche: Faber

I have DNA matches with the Conrad family that emigrated to Germantown, Pennsylvania. I share DNA matches with the Stauders the emigrated to Ohio from the Palatinate. 

 

Bernese Anabaptist Refugees to the Palatinate

  • Aeschlen bei Oberdiessbach, Bern: Rubeli, Muller migrated to Fischbach, RP and lived in Messerschwanderhof and Contwig.  The Rubeli were related to the Gungerich Anabaptists of Diessbach.  See: Mennosearch.com. 

My DNA matches the Rubeli descendants that emigrated to Pennsylvania before the Revolution.  They used Ruble and Ruple in America.  See also this former blog post for sources and references on the Rubeli: Immigrants #11 to 20 ~ The Anabaptist Rubeli of Aeschlen bei Oberdiessbach, Switzerland.

 

Links to my Palatinate Immigrants and Refugees on Ancestry.com

Christian Rubeli – Mennonite Refugee to the Palatinate

Anna Muller – Mennonite Refugee to the Palatinate

Emilia Bold Leies

Elisabetha Scheid Bold

Johannes Leies

Peter Leies – Palatinate Immigrant that died at Antietam

 

cinziarosagenealogy@comcast.net 

Shoot me an email if you want to compare DNA. Have a Wonderful Fourth!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Union Soldier Peter Leies, 1841-1862, born in Nunschweiler, Germany and killed at Antietam

Our newly discovered Union Private Peter Leies was born at Huberhof, Nunschweiler, Germany in 1841 and killed in action at the Battle of Antietam on September 17, 1862 in the single most bloodiest day in American history.  Peter is our cousin and left no wife or children.  He enlisted at age 21 in New York City in the NY 4th Infantry, Company “D.”

Antietam.PNG
Image from the Library of Congress

I found a little information about Peter in an American Civil War Research database.  I hope the link to him works for you before we hit a paywall.  The only other information I know about Peter and the war are the records I found pertaining to him on Ancestry.

PeterLeiesKilledinAction
His enlistment information from Ancestry.com

The enlistment officer wrote his name as Peter Leas. His pension card had that noted as his alias.  LEIES also appears on the pension card, and with the names of his parents on the card, I knew he was the first cousin to my great great grandfather Johann Leies.  I have all of the Leies baptisms and confirmations from Nunschweiler, Germany in a file.  In my research experience, nobody but an actual relative of my grandmother spells their surname as L-E-I-E-S.

In 1865, his mother Louisa Knerr Leies applied for his pension after the war ended.  PeterLeiesPensionCard.PNGIn 1874, his father then applied for the pension, probably after his mother passed.

I found Peter quite by accident last night.  I was chasing down the Leies relatives of Grandma in NYC and trying to prove Peter’s brother Jacob Leies enlisted in the Union Army.  I wasn’t looking for Peter until I found his parents listed on his pension card.  We have long known we had no direct ancestors in the United States Civil War.

I wonder now what possessed the ethnic Germans to enlist in the Civil War and desire to learn more about the Battle of Antietam.  I found a reference to Peter’s Company “D” on another Civil War page saying it was formed with the intent of being a solely German company.  I know that didn’t work out because there is a shamrock on the monument to his regiment at Antietam.  Follow this link to the memorial.

According to the 1855 NY State Census, Peter and his brother Jacob had been living in NYC since 1852.  I found a Jacob Leies enlisting in the NY 159th in 1862.  The problem is that on that enlistment record Jacob has his birthplace listed as Brooklyn.  I have Jacob’s baptismal record from Nunschweiler.  So I wonder if they put Brooklyn on the record if Jacob no longer had the German accent.  I will have to research Jacob some more.  He is the one that led me to Peter.

Grandma’s great grandfather Johann Schuttler made supply wagons for the Army of the Potomac at Peter Schuttler’s wagon company in Chicago during the Civil War.  See: What Grandma said: “SUPPLIED THE UNION ARMY DURING THE CIVIL WAR – SCHUTTLER WAGONS”.  A man that I have been trying to prove is his brother drove wagons in the Illinois 24th Infantry Regiment during the Civil War and was promoted to a Corporal.

With the United States Army Heritage Center so close by, I intend to take advantage of the opportunity to research Private Peter Leies further because, he is a Leies and he died in action.  He gets his own research binder.

In case you are wondering how we are related, Peter Leies and my great great grandfather Johann Leies shared the same grandfather.

PeterLeiesRelationship

 

cinziarosagenealogy@comcast.net

Immigrant #25 Great Great Grandmother Filomena Napolitano Ferraro

Filomena Napolitano was born in 1845 in Nola, Campania and immigrated to the United States, through Ellis Island in 1904 with her daughters and second son, my great grandfather Carmine Ferraro.  The title of this posting uses her husband’s last name after Napolitano because it was used on her death record in Columbus.  Had she stayed in Italy, she would have always been known as Filomena “Napolitano” because Italian women never change their surnames. In fact, Filomena arrived at Ellis Island as Napolitano as you can see on the Lombardia’s passenger manifest from April 28,1904.  manifestamferraro

I have written in the past on Filomena, Nola, and anything I could find on her father’s side: Carmine Ferraro’s Mother Filomena Napolitano from Nola, Napoli, Campania.

A post about the two headstones associated with her in the Mount Calvary Cemetery is here.  In case you are wondering, the cemetery still has no explanation on why she has two and why they are in separate places in the cemetery. This is her Find-a-Grave Memorial.

The following posts have already been written on her immigrant children:

Immigrant #5 ~ The Disappearing Antonio Ferraro

The Gift of a Genealogy Goldmine (An update on Antonio)

Immigrant #2: Angela Maria Ferraro Valerioti – Mother of a Renowned NYC Investigator and a NYC Refuse Company President

Immigrant #9 ~ Carmine A. Ferraro, Priest and Maestro

Immigrant #23 ~ Great Grand Aunt Elena Ferraro Scarnecchia

Two more immigrant children, Giovanina, and Gelsomina Ferraro Ciocco will be featured in upcoming weeks.

The post detailing her immigrant husband Angelo can be found here.

An earlier posting about her parents’ wedding is here:  On this day in 1842…

For approximately the past six months I have been researching Filomena’s mother’s interesting family, the Sabatinos from Sirico (now Saviano), Napoli, Campania, Italy.  They have been extremely easy to research, especially because Sirico was such a small town and appeared to have some money.  I literally have binders and files and piles of records from the microfilmed Sirico records from the Naples State Archives.  Filomena’s mother was Maria Michela Sabatino, born in 1809 in Sirico on Strada Napolitano, and at the time of her birth, her father Giaocchino was a sartore or tailor and was literate.  No, there is likely no connection between the Strada Napolitano and Maria Michela’s future husband – a Napolitano.  The surname is incredibly common in Campania.  Maria Michela’s mother was Santa di Conza and she was from Salerno.  I am patiently waiting for Salerno records to be put on Antenati.  Maria Michela appears to be the oldest of their eight children.

In the 1810s Giaocchino moved to being a vendittore di Piazza (seller on the Piazza), a tavernaro (tavernkeeper), and a bottegaro (shopkeeper).*  By 1822, Maria Michela’s father Giaocchino was a possidente or wealthy property owner.  He always seemed to be hanging around weddings in the town too signing as a witness where I found out about his wealthiest profession – possidente.  The signature of the man Giaocchino Sabatino was the same signature on his 1810s children’s birth.  I have an entire file of records that contain his signature.  One more thing I noticed in Sirico, all the literate Sabatinos of Sirico, too, spelled their surname with ONLY ONE ‘b’ when they signed their names.  ANNNNDDDDD, at one point in Sirico’s history, there was a Strada Sabatino according to the records.

possidente

Giaocchino Sabatino’s parents were Bartolomeo, a maestro sartore or master tailor, and Cecilia di Falco, an ostetrice or midwife.  That makes Filomena’s great grandmother from Sirico a midwife.  Giaocchino’s younger brother Lorenzo Sabatino was also a possidente and was Il Sindaco or mayor of Sirico from 1860-1861. 

From what I could find, Giaocchino only had brothers and from what I can surmise from viewing the town records, they were literate and educated like Giaocchino.  Their names and professions are as follows:

Federigo-calzolaio-shoemaker, vendittore di vino, industriante-trader m. Maria Felicia Ambruscino

Allesandro-sartore m. Domenica Vardolo

Giuseppe-sartore m. Marta D’Avella

Lorenzo-sartore, industriante, possidente, Il Sindaco m. Maria Giuseppa Tuzzolli

Giaocchino Sabatino died in 1847 in Ospedale degli Incurabili in Naples.  This is the Wikipedia link to this historical hospital with photos.  I found a reference to his death in that hospital on his son’s wedding record which I then located on Antenati.  Follow this link to his death record from the San Lorenzo quartiere of Napoli on Antenati.

As for Cecilia di Falco, she was born around 1763 in Sirico and I found many records about her and the babies she delivered.  She is the first midwife on my mother’s side.  Therefore, there will be more on the Midwife of Sirico as a later date…

Sources:

Ellis Island

Nola:  These microfilms

Sirico: All of these films

Antenati

I used this Roots Web link to help with older Italian occupations I found on microfilm.

*Some of the occupations found on the microfilms in Sirico were in the Neapolitan dialect. 

cinziarosagenealogy@comcast.net

 

 

Today’s Wedding Anniversary: Biagio Di Francesco and Marianna Di Pendima

san-nicola-di-bari

Farindola~~June 17, 1888.  On this day in 1888 my great great grandparents Biagio Di Francesco and Marianna Di Pendima were married in Farindola, Pescara.  They were both contadini and the parents of my great grandfather Paolo Di Francesco.

Biagio was born on January 15, 1866 in Trosciano, Farindola to Luigi Di Francesco and Anna Emidia Lucerini.  His birth record starts at the bottom of this page. Both of his parents were born in Farindola.   Marianna was born on March 17, 1868 in Cupoli, Farindola to Carlo Di Pentima from Via Piana, Pianella and Nicola Antonia (di) Giansante from Rione del San Giovanni, Penne.  Marianna’s birth.

The witnesses to their marriage were Clemente de Bernardinis, 43, Secretary (Municipal), and Domenico Ammazalorzco, 48, Country Guard (Municipal).

Follow this link to their marriage document.

Follow this link to their marriage allegati.

Biagio and Marianna welcomed their first child, Filomena, a little less than 9 months later.  She died in infancy.  Using other Farindola records on Antenati, I found that they went on to have at least 5 more children, and a stillborn.  One son, named Zopito, emigrated to Canada.  A daughter named Vincenza was born in 1890 and died in Farindola in 1954.

A son named Alfonso was born in 1892 and was a soldier in the 156 Regiment during World War 1 and died on August 12, 1915 from wounds received at Monte Cappuccio at the Second Battle of the Isonzo.  His death record was on Antenati here because his parents requested information on their son from the Italian Army.  In 1917, his military death record was sent from Rome to his parents and filed in the town records which I was able to access on Antenati.

 

alfonso.PNG
from Cadutigrandeguerra.it

 

My great grandfather Paolo Di Francesco was born in 1897.  On July 15, 1915, he was called to military service in World War I and served in the 30th Artillery Regiment of the Infrantry.  He was released from service in 1919.  He and his future wife Luigia Maria Massei named a son Alfonso.

Biagio and Marianna had a son named Luigi who was born in 1899.  He died in 1923 shortly after marrying Maria Vinci.  Biagio died in 1923 as well at 29 Via Rossetti, Farindola.  His death record is here.  Marianna Di Pendima lived at least until 1928 because I have not located her death record in Farindola.

A Bit About the Parents of Marianna Di Pendima

Marianna’s mother Nicola Antonia (di) Giansante’s grandparents were Saverio Di Giansante and Domenica Andreoli.  Saverio could write, and I have his signature from his son’s wedding record in Penne.  They were contadini as well.

Saverios sig

Saverio died in Penne but was born in Carpineto della Nora, Pescara, which is a few miles south of Farindola.  Saverio’s death. Saverio and Domenica have a lot of descendants researching them and I run into more and more people wondering if that is why our DNA matches, etc.  They are only in my tree once but in my Canadian cousins’ tree twice!  As I am typing this I am asking myself why I have not yet researched Carpineto della Nora on Antenati!

Marianna’s father Carlo Di Pentima was born in Pianella and was a contadino.  Carlo’s birth is on the left. Pianella is a few miles southeast of Farindola.  In Pianella, the surname is spelled with a ‘t’ and not the ‘d’ they gave it in Farindola.  I had to keep that in mind when I was looking at indexes.   I have been researching Pianella the past week and the town seems larger than Farindola. In the late 1700s Pianella had a colony of Albanians according to the Farindola history I found on this Farindolesi’s website.  I love that website.

 

Paolo.PNG
Paolo Di Francesco, Biagio and Marianna’s son

 

The research continues…Wouldn’t it be something if I found an Albanian surname in my tree?

Sources: Antenati, Cadutigrandeguerra.it, Archivio di Stato di Teramo, Zia C.

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In Which My AncestryDNA is Starting to Make Sense

My siblings love to hear what my DNA results are but they don’t want to get to get tested even though Ancestry keeps having sales.  I choose not to broadcast my results anymore because if they don’t want to know why my test doesn’t show that I am not 100% European and shows 12% something else, then, never mind.  Nor will I tell them how much Scandinavian or Iberian came up.  I do know that I don’t have South Asian DNA but someone we are related to does and that is likely a sign of Roma ancestry in that person.

I was contacted recently by a user with a shared match that had an adoptee in their ancestry.  So I have been looking more closely at my DNA on Ancestry.  I am still learning how to use AncestryDNA, and after a year and a half, by looking at my matches and grouping them together with my shared matches by surnames and birthplaces, I know for sure that I am related to my mother, because I match her first cousin and second cousins on both sides of her family, and I am also related to my father because of the Cirone  and Cacciatore matches.

Ancestry started something new this past spring called “Genetic Communities” in an effort, no doubt, to sell more DNA tests.  Genetic Communities are “groups of AncestryDNA customers who are connected… most likely because they descend from a population of common ancestors…For example some trace their roots back to groups of people who were isolated geographically…”  Source:  ANCESTRY.COM.

So, are you ready for my two genetic communities?   Here is my first:

genetic community
Italians in Umbria, Abruzzo & Molise

Here is the closeup:

dna close-up.PNG

My second genetic community is…

dun

dunnn

dunnnnnnnnnnnnnn…..

Southern Italians in which I have 35 DNA matches.

Surprised by either one?  No?  Then AncestryDNA got something right because the most recent immigrants in my tree were:  a parent from Abruzzo and a great grandparent from Campania.  Or maybe the Abruzzese and Campanian genetic makeup are similar?  I don’t know.  12.5% DNA from my Campanian great grandparent is a small amount to put me in the Southern Italian community that easily.  In case you are interested, the other people in the family that had DNA tests at Ancestry (and my family reading this knows who those people are) are not showing up in either of these Italian Genetic Communities.

-pace

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Today’s Birthday ~ Angela Maria di Massimo in Macchie, Farindola ~ My Second Great Grandmother

FarindolaToday’s birthday is Angela Maria di Massimo, born in 1871 at 10 a.m. in Macchie, Farindola, Pescara.  She was the mother of my great grandmother Maria Luigia Massei.

AngelaMariaDiMassimo

Angela MariadiMassimoPart2

  -Number 58-

-Angela Maria di Massimo-

The year 1871, day 7 of the month of June at hour 12, at the town hall, announced to me Massimo Ferri, Secretary of this Comune di Farindola, Penne Circuit, Province of Teramo, delegated, the Civil State Official, with the act of the Mayor dated the 20th of July last year, from the Procuratore of the King, appeared Donato di Massimo, of the living Serafino and the deceased Angela Maria Colangeli (Angela Maria Cecilia Colangeli), of 26 years, occupation contadino, living as a resident in Farindola, who presents a baby of the feminine gender, that he says was born on the 7th of the current month at the 10th hour to his wife Anna Domenica Cacciatore, daughter of the living Sabatino and the deceased Antonia Uriani (Oriani/Auriano), of 25 years, with whom he resides in their house in this Comune di Farindola at contrada Macchie, to this daughter he says he has given the name Angela Maria.

The above was declared and was also presented to me by Vincenzo Colangeli of the living Mattia of 37 years of the profession contadino and living as a resident in Farindola and of Costantino Massei (my third great grandfather and future father-in-law of Angela Maria di Massimo), of the living Sabatino of 39 years of the profession of contadino also living as a resident in Farindola.

The rest of the document says something to the effect of “the above act is presented and read to all of those present because they are illiterate.”

Signed: Civil State Officer Delegate

Massimo Ferri

Source: Antenati/Archivio di Stato di Pescara: Stato Civile Italiano, Farindola, Nati 1871 Numero 58

We know from other documents retrievable at Antenati that Angela Maria’s mother Anna Domenica Cacciatore was born in Penne.  Her father Donato di Massimo was born at a place in Farindola area called the Colle della Castagna.  I would love to figure out where that spot is on a map of Farindola.  Donato’s mother Angela Maria Cecilia Colangeli, for whom my second great grandmother was named, was born in Montebello di Bertona, a neighboring village.

Another map of Farindola

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Immigrant #24 ~~ Great Great Grandmother Emilia Anna Bold Leies~~

Immigrant Emilia Anna Bold was born in 1843 in Nuenschweiler, Rheinpfalz, Germany like her future husband Johann Leies.  She was the daughter of Nuenschweiler’s Catholic Schoolmaster Franz Jacob Bold and Elisabetha Scheid.  She was my second great grandmother.

EmiliaBold
Emilia’s baptism from the Catholic Kirchenbuch of Nuenschweiler.  Her godmother is her aunt Gertrud Scheid.  Father Peter Bold baptized her.  He was from Rodalben.  He baptized her mother in Rodalben in 1822 as well.

Emilia was 1 of 5 Bold children that survived to adulthood.  Her brothers Alexander, Richard, and sisters Juliana Rosa and Anna came to the United States sometime around 1866.  The Catholic Kirchenbuch of Nuenschweiler lists Emilia and her brother Alexander as being confirmed in 1865.  Their confirmation sponsor was Emilia’s future husband Johann Leies.  In that record the parish priest spelled his surname “Lays.”  Emilia’s brothers were both Chicago police officers.  We know that Immigrant #1: Chicago Police Officer Alexander Bold was naturalized in 1866 which leads me to believe that is about the same time Emilia arrived.  In those days you didn’t have to be in the country for at least 5 years before you could be naturalize.  Nobody has ever been able to find the immigration records of the Bolds coming to the United States.  Of course it is possible that Emilia came to America with Johann Leies.  However, there is no evidence they were married yet.  Their marriage was not in the Nuenschweiler Kirchenbuch.  I am making a guess they were married in Ohio.

Emilia married Johann Leies.  Their sons Alexander (my great grandfather) and John Ferdinand were born in 1870 and 1872, in Wooster, Ohio.

In 1876, Emilia and Johann moved to Chicago.  I regret that so little else is known about my second great grandmother.  Emilia died at age 51 in 1894 and is buried in Saint Boniface Cemetery in the Leies plot. Emilie Bold Leies (1843 – 1894) – Find A Grave Memorial.

Emilia’s second son, my great grandfather’s brother, John Ferdinand, was ordained a Redemptorist Priest in 1896 in New Orleans and died of a sudden illness shortly thereafter.  Uncle John wrote about his uncle John Ferdinand, and in the near future, it will be shared here, like the life of  The Multi-Faceted Life Of Fred Eckebrecht 1848-1920.

I only have two records plus a newspaper clipping in America that mention Emilia specifically.  She appears on the 1880 census in Chicago as wife of Johann Leies keeping house when he is running a tavern in Chicago.  The second record is her Cook County, Illinois death index record!  The news clipping is about a civil suit appeal in which she is mentioned in the Civil Suit roll as a plaintiff in 1877, the outcome of which I haven’t yet been able to find.  I think she was close to her brother Alexander, having named my great grandfather after him.  Maybe both of her brothers frequented her husband’s saloon.

Two years after her passing, Emilia’s widower married Caroline Sickel, a native of New Orleans.  She was the daughter of a French immigrant father and German immigrant mother with the surname of Kunz who Uncle John was certain was also a native of Nuenschweiler.  She and Johann had no children.

Back in Germany: Franz Jacob Bold

It is known that Emilia’s father Franz Jacob Bold stayed behind in Germany because in 1874 he appeared in this book in 1874 and listed as the schoolmaster of the Catholic school in Nuenschweiler:

FranzBook

bold
Snippet out of the blatt

Franz Jacob also signed Catholic Church records in Nuenschweiler as the head school master.  See Another Week, Another Country. Discoveries in Germany in the Leies Line. The Bolds have been hard to research beyond the parents of Franz Jacob Bold – Johann Adam Bold and Margaretha Becker.  He was born in nearby Labach in 1811, and was 1 of 8 children. They were 7 boys and 1 girl in all.  Emilia’s Bold grandfather was a farmer.  Source: Familienbuch, Knopp-Labach 1785-1799-1824.  They moved the family to Rodalben, a neighboring town to Nuenschweiler.  Source: Rodalben Kirchenbuch. Because Emilia’s father was the schoolmaster, I want to find out more about the Bolds to see if there are more teachers in her father’s ancestry.

“I can’t help but think the genes of Emilia’s father maybe the cause for so many schoolteachers in Emilia’s descendants.”

Elisabetha Scheid

Like Emilia, little is known about the life of her mother Elisabetha Scheid.  Could she have come to the United States with her children?  It is possible.  I found a widowed Elizabeth Bold in the 1900 New York City census living with a niece and nephew born in Germany in September 1822.  That jives with our Elisabetha.  But I can’t connect the niece and nephew to our Elisabetha.

Unfortunately, as is common in researching female ancestors, I know more about Elisabetha’s ancestry than I do her or her daughter Emilia Bold.  Elisabetha married Franz Jacob Bold in Nuenschweiler in 1842.  She was born in Rodalben in 1822.  Please refer to the map below.  Fr. Peter Bold baptized her.  Elisabetha was the youngest of the 10 children born to Catharina Buchler and Johann Jakob Scheid.  Once I had the names of her parents and birthplace, the ancestors just kept coming and are still increasing.  According to 850 Jahre Leimen Pfalzerwald** and Die Helfriche* a branch of Elisabetha’s ancestry was living in this southwestern area of the Palatinate before and after the Thirty Years War, which I understand was rare for that time period.  Sources: Nuenschweiler Kirchenbuch, Rodalben Kirchenbuch, Familien-und Seelen-Vercheisnissi fur Pfarrei Rodalben, 850 Jahre Leimen Pfalzerwald, Die Helfriche.

Elisabetha’s great grandfather Frederic Scheidt was born in Loutzviller, Moselle, France in 1691.

frederic scheidt baptism
Frederic Scheidt had a “t” at the end of his name on his baptism.  I was lucky.  His baptism was on the first page of records at Archives 57.

Source: Baptemes Loutzviller, Archives Moselle/Archives 57, Rodalben Kirchenbuch, Register zu Gerichtsbuch Amtes Grafenstein .  The surname is seen with a “t” at the end in Moselle, France.

Elisabethatree.PNG
Portion of Elisabetha’s pedigree

I like to refer to Elisabetha Scheid as one of the “mill ladies” in my German ancestry because she is one of the ladies that descends from a lot of millers.  Two of her great grandfathers, Frederic Scheidt and Christian Becker were millers near Rodalben in Germany.  There is evidence from the land purchases and sales in the Register zu Gerichtsbuch des Amtes Grafenstein 1657-1732, that Frederic Scheidt owned several mills in the Rodalben area to include Trulben.  Frederic Scheidt’s migration story is coming. 

Two of Elisabetha’s great great grandfathers, Johann Jacob (Georg) Hauck and Jean Nicolas Scheidt owned mills.  Johann Jacob (Georg) Hauck owned a mill in Vinningen near Rodalben while Jean Nicolas Scheidt owned the Moulin d’Eschviller in Volmunster, Moselle which had previously been owned by his father-in-law Nicolas Bittel/Buttel.  This was likely the town’s mill.  The current day Moulin d’Eschvhiller is not the mill that was standing in the 1600s.  Nicolas Bittel’s father Gall Bittel was a miller in Haspelschiedt, Moselle.  Right there, Elisabetha Scheid has at least 6 ancestors owning or operating mills in the Palatinate and Moselle.  Sources:  Register zu Gerichtsbuh des Amtes Grafenstein, Rodalben Kirchenbuch, 850 Jahre Leimen Pfalzerwald, Die Helfriche, Archives Moselle/Archives 57, Heredis Online, Wikipedia. 

 

Rodalben Area.PNG
Map of the southwest corner of the German Palatinate bordering Moselle, Lorraine.  Some areas mentioned are underlined in red.  The arrow at the top points to the direction of Leiningen, Germany and the arrow at the bottom points to the direction of Bitche, Moselle.

 

Before I write about the unconfirmed part of Elisabetha’s Moselle ancestry from the French Genealogy website Geneanet.org, I have to account for two small things regarding Elisabetha’s ancestry which are also confirmed through credible sources.  Her great great great grandfather Jean Jacques Hauck was Game Keeper (Garde Forestier) and Court Alderman (Eschevin de Justice).  Source: Heredis Online.  His son, the miller Johann Jacob Georg, married Anna Katharina Helfrich.  Do you remember that surname from the Schultheiss post?  Anna Katharina Helfrich was the daughter of Schultheiss Johann Valentin Helfrich.  Now if I am counting correctly, Anna Katharina Helfrich was also the 6th great granddaughter of Junker Helfrich of Leiningen, who was alive in the early 1400s.  Emilia Bold would then be the 11th great grand daughter of Junker Helfrich.  Sources: Die Helfriche, 850 Jahre Leimen Pfalzerwald, Rodalben Kirchenbuch.  A Junker is a usually a minor nobleman or an honorific title, or a country squire.  Source: Wikipedia.

 

LeiningenSchloss
Leiningen Schloss

 

Unconfirmed Scheidt Possibilities:

Every time I turn around there are more French genealogy sites giving me more avenues on these ancestors.  The major French genealogy site is called Geneanet.org.  There are spectacular trees from Moselle on there.  And the sources!   Wow!   Their sourced tree are incredible!  Many trees on Geneanet detail parts of the French ancestry of Elisabetha Scheid, that me as an American, without access to more records can neither prove or deny  without having someone visit the archives for me.  One tree makes a claim that Frederic Scheidt’s great grandfather Alexandre Zeigler was a miller in Volmunster.  This data is confirmed at Heredis Online but is not confirmable elsewhere.  If that turns out to be true, that would make seven millers in Elisabetha’s ancestry.

Frederictree.PNG
Frederic’s pedigree.  If correct, Francois Jacques and Ottilia would be my 10th great grandparents

 

Gall Bittel, mentioned above, if the trees can be believed, is purported to have been born in Sarreguemines, Moselle and his father Nicolas Shaub “dit Bittel” is alleged to have migrated from Switzerland or Tyrol.  The sources in these trees site notarial records of Comte de Bitche that were not destroyed during the Thirty Years War.  Another tree makes the claim that Frederic Scheidt’s great grandfather Francois Jacques Fabing/Faber was born in Switzerland, while another one ties the surname to the Fabers that lived in Bitche, Moselle.  If the latter is to be believed, and Emilia Bold’s ancestor Susanna Fabing’s father is actually a Faber from Bitche, and not Switzerland, then Emilia Bold and Johann Leies would be distantly related to each other because the Bitche Fabers are in the ancestry of my second great grandfather Johann Leies as well.  The French have access to older records and genealogy books at their genealogy societies that I can only dream of accessing here.  I am still skeptical about these Fabers/Fabings and Nicolas Shaub claims .

I wish I knew half as much about Emilia that I do about her mother’s ancestry and I just wish I had a photo of her.

In addition to the sources mentioned throughout this post that can be found at Family Search online and on microflim or online at Archives Moselle/57, the following sources were used:

Uncle John’s writings

Find-a-Grave

United States Federal Censuses

Cook County Marriage and Death Indexes

Newspapers.com

*The book on the Helfrich’s full title is: Die Helfriche im Grafensteiner Amt by Alfons Helfrich.  It is not available online.

**The link to 850 Jahre Leimen is here: click me

Coming:  The next immigrant is Carmine Ferraro’s Mother Filomena Napolitano from Nola, Napoli, Campania.  I don’t have much more to add about Filomena’s life beyond what was in that previous post.  I have been investigating her mother’s tree for about 6 months and found a midwife ancestress that I have been studying.

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-A