Women’s History Month: A Letter to and from My 9th Great Grandmother Kunigonde (Surname Unknown)

Dear Great Great Great Great Great Great Great Great Great Grandmother Kunigonde,

You have the most interesting name in my tree and your last name is not known to those of us researching you.  You were the mother of my ancestor named Michael Kempf.  He lived in a town named Hornbach.   I have discovered that you were Roman Catholic and the historic church in Hornbach contains the bones of St. Pirminius.  You must’ve worshipped there.

I didn’t know Kunigonde was even a name until I found you.  I looked up the meaning and origin.  It is from the Old High German and sometimes spelled as Kunigonda.  The name dictionaries call it a two-element name.  Kunni=the tribe, the clan.  Gund=the fight, the battle.  I really dig the two-element meaning of your name!

Apparently there was a St. Kunigonde and she was the daughter of King Bela of Hungary. She is the patroness of Poland and Lithuania where she is known as St. Kinga.

Was Kunigonde a family name in your family?

Did you know your third great grandson was named Heinrich Leies and he traveled across the ocean to the United States of America in 1848 with his family to have a farm in Wooster, Ohio?  His brother Jacob Leies came three years later to the greatest city in the New World called New York City.  Your fourth great grandson named Peter Leies joined the Union Army during the nation’s Civil War and died at a battle called the Battle of Antietam.  He was only 21 and he was born in Nunschweiler, not far from Hornbach.

Another fourth great grandson followed Heinrich to Wooster, Ohio.  His name was Johann Leies and Heinrich was his uncle.  He was my ancestor.  He ran saloons in Chicago and was a piano dealer.  He had very religious sons.  One became a Roman Catholic priest and died in New Orleans, Louisiana. 

Did you know you probably have thousands of descendants across the ocean in America perhaps due in part to Heinrich’s emigration?

You are named in a book called the Rubenheim Register from Zwiebrucken.  I would love to see that book.  But, what can YOU tell me that the book doesn’t.  What was Hornbach life like?

Sincerely,

One of your thousands of descendants

 

Hornbach1550
1550 Hornbach, via Wikipedia

 

Dear 9th Great Granddaughter,

Females rarely learned to write in my day unless they took a religious order.  My good friend Sr. Marie Radegonde Belina is writing this for me.  What an angel she is too to be able to translate English to our dialect and back to English for me.  She was a half English/half French orphan the good Sisters took in.

Thank you for digging my name.  I don’t know what you mean by “digging.” 

What can I tell you about my life?  I was born at a time of a long religious, political, and terrible war – The Thirty Years War.  We would hear from the priests there was a peace and then another peace.  But it would not end.  Then a few years later there would be word of another peace. 

We did not care about those far away princes fighting for power.  We were more concerned with having food on our tables when the winter was through.  Half the men in my family were gone and another quarter of my family uprooted themselves and were never heard from again.  We just wanted it to end.  

When I married, the war was coming to an end.  My husband (your 9th great grandfather) and I lived near Hornbach at a time the entire surrounding area was almost devoid of citizens and buildings due to the many years of war.  The country-side had been devastated due to famine, disease, and theft.  The old town wall of Hornbach and our church were some of the few things left.

We were ruled by the Duke of Zwiebrucken. 

Before the war, Hornbach was once surrounded by rich vineyards.  Nobody came back to re-plant them.  Instead, after the war, the Dukes invited people from the Swiss Cantons and from Tyrol to our area to farm.  They were rumored to be excellent farmers. 

Some of my descendants married the descendants of the Swiss immigrants.

My husband Johann Kempf and I had a farm.  We had 8 children:  Matthias, Anna Christina, Michael, your 8th great grandfather, twins Kunigonde and Johann, Maria Katharina, and twins Regina and Anna Margaretha. 

Michael was my second born son and he was trained to follow his father as a farmer. 

I died before I could see Michael’s children be born.  

I died before France took control of the Hornbach-Zwiebrucken area in 1680.

Yes, I heard about Heinrich and the others.  Nunschweiler was very tiny in my day. 

Heinrich Layes (that’s how Sr. Marie Gertruda spells the surname) left Germany at a time when liberal nationalists pushed for civil liberties here.  The cost of the war I lived through and cost of that war on our people was ingrained in their minds.  

In 1848, these forward thinking men had to flee their homeland for your country –  a country that had established those ideals when those in power began to silence their democratic plans.

Keep shaking those female branches of my tree in Germany.  You aren’t even close to finding all of my descendants in America.  

Signed,

Your Ahnfrau

 

 

 

 

 

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Immigrants #35 and #36 ~ Chicago Policeman Richard Bold and Stationary Engineer Ferdinand Bold, Two of Emilia Bold’s Brothers and Both a Part of Historical Tragedies ~

Recently I was contacted by two fourth cousins researching the immigrant Bolds.  Thank you to B.R., a descendant of Alexander Bold, who pointed out that Elisabetha Scheid Bold and Franz Jacob Bold had another child that came to America and was named Ferdinand Bold.  He and his family were part of a New York City tragedy that was absolutely horrifying to discover.  Now knowing of this immigrant brother of Emilia Bold Leies, it makes sense that she named her second son John Ferdinand.

A descendant of Anna Bold Leies and Jacob Leies, P.A., informed me that there may be at three least cases of Bolds marrying Leieses in our lines.  We plan to sort it out!  This includes a possible case of one of the daughters of Anna Bold Leies, that I had vowed to find in a previous post, marrying her first cousin – a Bold!

TA also told me that Leies, on her side of the family, is pronounced LEESS.  Not LE-AS as it is on our side and there are some Leies relations residing in Pennsylvania.  Interesting indeed! Thank you for finding me!

Emilia Bold’s Youngest Brothers

Emilia Bold’s youngest immigrant brothers Richard and Ferdinand Bold seem to have traveled to America together when Richard was 17, arriving at the port of New York on November 25, 1871, on the Donau which sailed from Bremen, Germany.  The strange thing about the passenger manifest I found listed Ferdinand as age 9.  American records point to his age as having been 13.

This confuses me and leads me to doubt whether or not a Richard Bold and Ferdinand Bold traveling together are the same Richard and Ferdinand that are the brothers of Emilia.  However, if it is in fact the correct people, it is not the first time we have seen Emilia’s siblings traveling alone without parents.  Emilia’s sister Anna came here alone at the age of 15 as noted in this previous post: Immigrants #32-#34 ~~Great Great Great Grandmother Elisabetha Scheid Bold, her daughters Rosa Bold Ertl, Anna Maria Bold Leies, and their in-laws~~Today’s post is an update to that previous post.

Ferdinand J. Bold

In 1880, at B.R.’s direction, Ferdinand Bold was found marrying Mary Knaup (daughter of Anthony Knaup and Frances Nackes), a German-American born in New York City.  According to that year’s Federal Census, he was working as a stationary engineer.  The New York Marriage Index on Family Search says he was born in 1858 in Nenschweiler.  To me, that is close enough to mean Nuenschweiler, where the majority of his siblings were born.

That year, Ferdinand and his wife resided at 218 Sullivan Street with his mother-in-law Frances Knaup, sister-in-law Teresa Knaup, and brother-in-law John Knaup.  The census sheets before and after theirs reveal it to be a neighborhood made up of immigrants from Germany and Ireland.

In November of 1880, according to the Naturalization Index, Ferdinand became a naturalized citizen of the United States.

The Bolds and the Grand Street Tenement Disaster

In 1881, according to many newspaper articles, Ferdinand, wife Mary, their baby Joseph, and his wife’s family lived at the corner of 5th Avenue and Grand Street on the top floor when the tenement suddenly caved in.  It was a three floor building and Ferdinand’s family lived on the top.  It became known as the Grand Street Tenement Disaster and was nation-wide news.  Below are samples of some news clippings about the tragedy.

Nov101881ChicagoTribune
The Chicago Tribune, November 10, 1881

 

 

BrooklynDailyEagleNov91881
The Brooklyn Daily Eagle, November 9, 1881 – Note near the bottom of the paragraph the Bolds are mentioned

 

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The Chicago Inter-Ocean, November 10, 1881 – Note the paragraph about Ferdinand Bold’s family

Ferdinand’s wife’s mother and brother were killed.  She herself was badly injured but survived.  The news clippings I found about the collapse described some pretty horrific details.  Some of them were in Chicago newspapers.  Imagine how great great grandmother Emilia Bold Leies and her other Chicago siblings must have worried when they read the news there!

Below is an image found on Google images, Amazon, Abe Books, and eBay from an engraving Harpers Weekly made and printed and is called “Grand Street Tenement House Disaster.”  Originals are for sale out there on the internet.  Ferdinand Bold may be in the image.

Grand Street Tenement Disaster It is a miracle baby Joseph survived.  The following spring, Ferdinand sued James O’Brien, the owner of the building, for $1,100.00 damages.  He was awarded $426.00.  Current inflation makes that a little less than $10,000.00.

NewYorkTimesMarch71882
The New York Times, March 7, 1882

A coroner’s jury was held and found James O’Brien and the owner of the adjacent building, Julius Levy, grossly negligent in the deaths of 9 tenants of the building, however, a grand jury found no criminal negligence on their part!

Ferdinand and Mary went on to have 3 more children after Joseph: Theresa, Frederick, and Albert Joseph.  Unfortunately, Ferdinand passed away young in February, 1893.

Wife Mary evidently re-married around 1895 to a Mr. Brennan because the 1900 Federal Census names her as Mary Brennan, widowed, and having been married 5 years.  Mr. Brennan had already died.   She was raising her children and his three children as well.

Ferdinand’s Descendants

Ferdinand’s children Theresa and Joseph worked in a stationary factory and never married.

Ferdinand’s sons Frederick and Albert both married.  Three grandchildren of Ferdinand served in the military.  Frederick’s two sons, Frederick James and Joseph Aloysius joined the New York National Guard while Albert’s son Walter Albert was an Army Veteran of World War II, adding to the number of descendants of Elisabeth Scheid Bold that joined the United States Military in some fashion.  Joseph Aloysius died in an automobile accident shortly after signing up for National Guard duty.

All World War I and World War II draft records that I could find for Ferdinand’s children and their descendants describe them as tall individuals, medium build, with brown hair, brown eyes, and a light complexion.

I do not know where Ferdinand is buried.

Richard Bold

Richard Bold was born in 1854 in Busenberg, a few miles from Nuesnchweiler, Germany.  A few years after he arrived at the Port of New York in 1871, I found him in the 1878 Chicago Directory, working as a barber.  At the time of the 1880 Federal Census, he was living with his older brother Alexander and his wife and family, still working as a barber.

I found a news clipping stating that on May 31, 1882, Richard Bold was appointed to the Police Department.  His brother Alexander was also a policer officer at this time.  In 1883 he married another German immigrant, Louise Ruf, daughter of Louis Ruf and Henrietta Gerber.  Later clippings regarding Richard Bold state he was a patrolman at the Larrabee Street Station.  Grandma Ferraro lived on Larrabee.

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Chicago Inter-Ocean, June 1, 1882

The Haymarket Massacre and the Bolds

On May 3, 1886, labor demonstrators across the country rallied in support of an 8 hour work day.  A peaceful demonstration in Chicago turned deadly when Chicago police officers attacked and killed picketers at the McCormick Reaper Plant.

The following day, on May 4, 1886, the Haymarket Massacre took place in Haymarket Square.   It too started as a peaceful labor demonstration organized by a few anarchists in support of that 8 hour work day and in support of the laborers the Chicago police had killed the day before.  One of the speakers at the Haymarket Square that evening was a lay Methodist Minister from England, a known activist.

At 10:30 pm, when, according to the data at the Illinois Labor History Society, 176 Chicago Police Officers carrying Winchester repeater rifles were trying to disperse the remaining crowd of 200, an unknown individual threw a dynamite bomb at the police, killing seven of them, and four civilians, and injuring many others.  Gunfire immediately following the blast also resulted in some of the deaths and injuries.  Source:  Wikipedia.

It is unknown who fired the first shot following the bombing and some reports said in the chaos the Chicago police ended up firing on each other.  A historian believes that in less than 5 minutes, 176 Chicago police officers had gotten what they desired because Haymarket Square was emptied of everyone, except for the casualties. Sources: Wikipedia, Chicagocop.com., and Chicagology.com

The next day, Marshal Law was declared in Chicago and the front page of the entire Chicago Tribune was dedicated to “hellish event”.  Source: newspapers.com.

Eventually, in actions led by irrational fear of the foreign born (including several Germans), eight accused anarchists were illegally rounded up, tried and convicted, and hung – including the lay Methodist minister from England.  One commit suicide the evening before the handing.  Later some were pardoned.  Sources: Wikipedia, Illinois Labor History Society, and Chicagocop.com.

More about controversial Haymarket can be found here: Wikipedia article.

I suppose, with the fact that 176 Chicago police officers were there that night, Police Officer Alexander Bold (then assigned to the Des Plaines Street Station) was likely there.  See Chicagocop.com – on duty police officers of the Des Plaines Street Station were at Haymarket that evening.   Patrolman Richard Bold MAY have been there as well.

In 1887, a list was printed in the newspaper of the contributions each police officer in the city made towards the “Haymarket Monument Fund.”  Richard Bold contributed .25 to the fund as part of the Larrabee Street Station.  According to Wikipedia, that monument had been damaged in the early 1900s and later destroyed in demonstrations against the Vietnam War.  A new monument dedicated to the event now stands in front of the Chicago Police Headquarters.

In 1888, I found Richard Bold on the Chicago Voter Registration stating he had lived in Chicago for 15 years and was naturalized. Perhaps he lived in NYC for two years with his Bold relatives there.

In 1889, Richard Bold appeared in list of Chicagoans in the paper who had contributed to the fund for the Chicago’s World Fair.  He contributed $20!  He never lived to see the Fair though.

He passed away in 1890 from influenza complications.  Below is his death notice.

Jan181890
January 18, 1890, The Chicago Inter-Ocean

Richard had a son named Richard, born shortly after his death.  He didn’t live to his first birthday.  I have no idea who the other child is of Richard that is mentioned in his death notice.

Richard Bold is buried in St. Boniface Cemetery, burial place of his sister Emilia Bold Leies.

This all makes me wonder when did Emilia Bold get here and who did she come with, or was she like her siblings and came alone or as a teenager without an adult?

Sources:

B.R., fourth cousin

T.A., fourth cousin

New York Passenger Manifests

Family Search Busenberg Catholic Church Records

New York City Marriage Index and Death Indexes

Social Security Death Indexes

World War I and World War II Draft Cards

United States Veteran’s Burial Cards

United States Naturalization Indexes

New York National Guard Enlistment Cards

Federal Censuses

Newspapers.com

Cook County Marriage and Death Indexes

Illinois Labor History Society

Chicagocop.com

Chicago Voter Registration, 1888

City Directories

Wikipedia

Find-a-Grave

Nueschweiler, Germany Catholic Church Confirmation Records via microfilm 

Chicagology.com

Google

babbonatale

 

 Merry Christmas!

cinziarosagenealogy@comcast.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Immigrants #32-#34 ~~Great Great Great Grandmother Elisabetha Scheid Bold, her daughters Rosa Bold Ertl, Anna Maria Bold Leies, and their in-laws~~

Recently, I discovered and can confirm that, yes, second great grandmother Emilia Bold’s mother Elisabetha Scheid Bold did come to America, at the age of 57 in 1880, sailing from Rotterdam, Netherlands aboard the ship the Scheidam and died in Manhattan in 1905.  Her daughter Rosa traveled with her.  They traveled in steerage and no profession was listed for either of them.  Through clues in censuses, it appears Elisabetha’s husband, Jacob Scheid, Nunschweiler’s Head Catholic Schoolmaster, had passed away.  Elisabetha came to live with her daughter, Anna Maria Bold, who had been in America for 13 years.

Anna Maria Bold Leies

I find Emilia Bold’s sister intriguing because of the age that she came here alone.  According to church records, Anna Maria Bold was born in 1852 in Busenberg, Germany, a few miles from Nuenschweiler.  At the age of 15, in 1867, Anna Bold’s name appeared in the Hamburg Passenger Lists on the ship named Cimbria sailing for the Port of New York.  Her place of origin was Nunschweiler.  She traveled in steerage.  The passenger listing really specifies her age as 15!  Anna Bold is also listed in the Germans to America index at the age of 15.  Castle Garden lists her as arriving on June 13, 1867 at the age of 15 as well.  The burning question is, did she know anyone on the Cimbria?!  Is there anyone out there researching her that can shed light on this?  What prompted her to leave her home at this age?

AnnaBold
Cimbria’s listing for Anna.  Literacy was not specified.

 

The next year, Anna Bold married Jacob Leies on December 6, 1868 at the age of 16, according to the recently released New York City Marriage Index.  At first I thought this was a mistake that she was marrying at 16 and marrying a Leies.  I actually discounted the index when I first found it.  But no, it is all real and she is really Emilia’s sister.  The marriage index listed the names of Jacob’s parents and also his birthplace as Huberhof – the same farm as second great grandfather Johann Leies.

What is our relationship to Jacob Leies?

Jacob Leies was first cousin to our second great grandfather Johann Leies.  Jacob Leies and Johann Leies shared the same grandparents.  Johann Leies (great great grandfather)  is the husband of Emilia Bold – sister of Anna Maria Bold.  

Jacob Leies was born in Nunschweiler to Johann Jacob Leies and Louisa Catharina Knerr, who immigrated to the United States around 1854 when Jacob was 14.  He and his parents were living in New York City’s 8th Ward at the time of the 1855 New York State Census.  Johann Jacob was listed as a laborer on that census.  The entire Leies family had their surname misspelled as Lyse on that record.

Even though Jacob was about 14 years older than Anna Bold, Anna Bold would have been about the age of 2 when Jacob would have left for America.

Also, Jacob Leies is the brother of Union Soldier Peter Leies, 1841-1862, born in Nunschweiler, Germany and killed at Antietam.  Jacob spent time in the Union Army as well, after his brother’s death at Antietam, in the NY 159th Infantry Regiment.  I have had trouble locating information on Jacob in the Union Army and don’t want to spend the money to order the service records of a first cousin 4 x removed to me no matter how fascinated I am by immigrants in the United States Civil War.

Coincidentally, after the war, Jacob supported Anna and their children as a “manufacturer of artificial limbs.”  That made me wonder if Jacob suffered an injury during the Civil War, so I looked for a pension.  I couldn’t locate proof of one.  The spelling of Leies in most records at this time in America is allover the place as well.  On the other hand, his choice of profession choice could mean nothing.

On to Elisabetha Scheid Bold…

Elisabetha Scheid was born in 1822 in Rodalben to Johann Jacob Scheid and Catharina Buchler according to Rodalben’s Kirkenbuch and Familienbuch.  She married Franz Jacob Bold in Nunschweiler, in 1842 where he was the schoolmaster.  This current blog post is updating some of the facts regarding Elisabetha Scheid in this previous post.

On January 24, 1880, Elisabetha and her youngest daughter, Rosa, arrived in the Port of New York on the ship the Scheidam, which had sailed from Rotterdam, Netherlands.

Scheidam

 

manifest
This is the largest I can make this snippet of their manifest

 

American records point to proof that Elisabetha’s husband Jacob Bold had passed away in Nunschweiler by 1880.  I found an Elisabetha Bold on the 1880 Federal Census living with her daughter Anna and son-in-law Jacob Leies, and their children Mary Ann, Richard Joseph, Louisa, Jacob Aloysius, and Anna.  Her relationship to head of household Jacob was listed as “mother.” The box for widowed/divorced is checked next to Elisabetha’s name.

Back to Anna…

In 1885, Elisabetha’s son-in-law Jacob Leies passed away.  In 1897, Anna Bold Leies passed away.  Anna’s will on Ancestry.com listed all of her children as heirs and a man listed as her cousin Jacob Weinlin, as Executor.

A little on her children:  Anna’s son Jacob Aloysius Leies joined the United States Navy in 1905.  After his service, he was a post office clerk and never married.  Richard was a merchant/salesman according to federal censuses and city directories.  I have been able to trace Richard’s large amount of descendants to the 1990s while I am still trying to track down what happened Anna’s daughters Louisa, Mary Ann, and Anna.

Juliana Rosa Bold Ertl

Rosa (Julian Rosa) Bold was born in 1860 in Nunschweiler.  As stated above, she came to the United States with her mother in 1880.  It is unclear how long she was in New York City.  She was not on the census with her mother in 1880, nor with her Chicago siblings Richard, Alex, and Emilia.

By 1883 though, she is found in Chicago marrying another German immigrant named John Ertl,  They had three children:  Elizabeth, Karl, and John.  She passed away young, on April 4, 1891 in Chicago.

I could only find one of Rosa’s children in adulthood – Elizabeth, whose profession on the 1940 Federal Census was listed as a stenographer for an architect company.  She never married.  I am still searching for her sons.

Back to Elisabetha…

By the time of the 1900 federal census, Elisabetha was living with Jacob Weinlein, his wife Louisa, and their family in New York City.  Elisabetha was listed as “aunt” as to her relationship with the head of household Jacob.  (He is the same man that was the Executor of Anna’s will.) Elisabetha stated she was widowed, a mother of “8” children and when asked if any of her children were living the number was “0.”

I found that number interesting because her son Immigrant #1: Chicago Police Officer Alexander Bold, was still alive.  You may remember that Alexander had a rocky family life and his wife had divorced him on grounds of cruelty.  I suppose it could be that he was estranged from his family. 

I too count 8 children born to Elisabetha in Germany, as follows:

Emilia – born in 1843, died in 1894 in Chicago

Rosalia Maria Magdalena – born in 1846, died as an infant

Catharina Michaelina – born in 1848, died unk.

Helen Catharina – born in 1849, died unk.

Alexander – born in 1850, died in 1910 in Chicago

Anna Maria – born in 1852, died in 1897 in NYC

Richard – born in 1854, died in 1889 in Chicago (have not told his story yet)

Juliana Rosa – born in 1860, died in 1891 in Chicago

Please see this post on two more brothers of Emilia for an update on this post and more information on the Bold family.

 

The census taker wrote “yes” in the block under “Can Speak English” in the 1900 federal census for Elisabetha.

Elisabetha passed away on January 14, 1905 in Manhattan.  Several of her descendants are buried in Gate of Heaven Cemetery in Westchester County, New York.  I wonder if her grave is there also.  I have not located it yet.  The New York Death Index did list her parents as Jacob Scheid and Catharina Bechler.  That is so close to Buchler, there can be no mistake that 3rd great grandmother Elisabetha Scheid Bold came to the United States too.

On this Veteran’s Day weekend, I decided to count the amount of Veterans that I could find descended from Elisabetha Scheid and her husband Franz Jacob Bold.  So far, this is what I have: 1 U.S. Navy Veteran, 1 World War I Veteran, 6 World War II Veterans (3 of which were brothers) including Colonel Gerard M. Leies.

I will find what happened to Rosa’s sons and Anna’s daughters!!!!!!!!

Sources:

Familien – und Seelen-Verzeichnissi fur Pfarrei Rodalben

Rodalben Kirchenbuch

Nunschweiler Catholic Church records via microfilm

Busenberg Catholic Church recrods via Family Search

Hamburg Passenger Lists

New York Passenger Lists

CastleGarden.org

Germans to America

New York State Censuses

United States Federal Censuses

New York City Directories

New York and Chicago birth, marriage, and death indexes

New York State Civil War Muster Rolls

Fold3.com

Various records from National Archives pertaining to the descendants of Richard Leies

 

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Veteran’s Day 2017 ~~~ Colonel Gerard M. Leies ~~~

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This year on Veteran’s Day I remember my great uncle Colonel Gerard M. Leies, United Stated Air Force.

Military Commendations:

Air Medal with Two Oak Leaves

Air Force Commendation Medal

Air Force Outstanding Unit Award

 

Great Uncle Gerard attended the University of Chicago and University of California and received a master’s degree in physics after attending Loyola University.

He enlisted in the Air Corp on June 23rd, 1941.  He served as a weather officer for the 13th Bomber Command and 13th Air Force supporting the Guadalcanal and Philippines Liberation campaigns.

He left military service at the end of the war and returned in 1948.  From 1948 to 1950 he served as Special Projects Officer with the Air Weather Service in Washington, D.C.

In 1953 he was assigned to Aeronautical Research Laboratory at Wright – Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton, Ohio, serving as a physicist and then as Chief of the Modern Physics branch.  He and Donald Reynolds developed a solar generator that ran through cadmium sulfide which the Air Force hoped would be used to power homes in the future.  This headline news was picked up by the Associated Press and re-printed across the country in June, 1954.

Uncle Gerard did further work for the Air Force in nuclear physics, solid wastes physics, plasma physics, relativity, and nuclear engineering at the Air Force Technical Applications Center in Orlando, Florida.

In 1962 he was awarded a doctorate from Georgetown University and retired from the Air Force.  He remained active in research for the Air Force as a civilian and expanded his research field to include nucleonics.

 

GerardLeies
Colonel Leies is on the right

 

Uncle Gerard died in 2008.  His obituary attributes him to being one of the nation’s first nuclear physicists.  He is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.

Thank you Colonel Gerard M. Leies

Sources: National Archives, Newspapers.com