Today’s Wedding Anniversary ~~ Filippo Marcella and Elisabetta Rossi ~~

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On this day 124 years ago in Farindola, Italy, Elisabetta Rossi married Filippo Marcella.  They were the parents of my great grandfather Cesidio.

marriagetitleElisabetta Rossi was born in 1866 in Valleceraso, Bacucco, Teramo, a neighboring town, to Giuseppe Antonio Rossi and Anna Antonia Ricci.

arsita
The valley outside Bacucco (Arsita), Teramo

Her parents had moved to Farindola before the marriage of their oldest child, Elisabetta.  Elisabetta’s father was originally from Penne, Pescara, having been born there.  I was able to trace back to 6th great grandparents in the Rossi line born around 1740 in Penne.  Giuseppe’s father Domenico was literate and I have a few of his signatures saved.  The one below is from his son’s marriage to Elisabetta’s mother, Anna Antonia Ricci, in Bacucco in 1865.

DomenicoRossiSignature

Anna Antonia Ricci was born in Castiglione Messer Raimondo, Teramo.  However her parents were also born and married in Penne, Pescara.  I was able to trace the Ricci back to the mid 1700s in Penne too, to another set of 6th great grandparents.  The Ricci married a member of the Delle Monache family through which I was able to trace to a set of 7th great grandparents born around 1700.  They were Anastasio Delle Monache and a lady named Lorenza.

My great great grandmother Elisabetta Rossi was the oldest child and had at least 7 siblings: Antonio, Palma, Domenico, Maria Carmina, Giovanni, Anna Domenica, and Girolamo.

Antenati link to Elisabetta’s and Filippo’s marriage

Antenati link to their marriage allegati

Elisabetta married Filippo Marcella, a man who was a widower, and also 23 years older than she was.  Coincidentally, I noticed on the birth records of Filippo’s children to Elisabetta that his age somehow decrease with each record!

Filippo was born in 1844 in Trosciano, Farindola, Pescara to Massimo Nicola Marcella and Maria Carolina Colangeli.  Through miracles of modern Google Earth, this is a clipped image of Contrada Trosciano in Farindola.

trosciano

Filippo’s first wife was Maria Antonia Lacchetta, the daughter of Filippo Lacchetta and Maria Salzetta.  Maria Antonia had passed away in April of 1893 and Filippo Marcella was left with small children to raise. We don’t know the circumstances of her death but she had given birth to at least 11 children in 20 years.  Some of the children didn’t survive a few days or past infancy.

Filippo’s children with Maria Antonia were: Carmela (died in infancy), Cesidio (died in infancy), Maria Grazia, Donato (died in infancy), Bambino (stillborn), Andrea, Carmine, Raffaele, Pasqua, Filomena, Serafina.

Elisabetta’s first born was my great grandfather Cesidio.  Her other children were Maria Domenica, Antonia Vincenza, and Antonio Andrea.

Filippo Marcella was the fourth of ten children.  He had two sets of twin sisters.  The first set passed away in their childhoods.  He also had a brother that passed away in his childhood.  The siblings that survived to adulthood are as follows: Maria Giustina, Maria Giuseppa (midwife)*, Domenico**, Nicola (Antonio), and the second set of twins Serafina and Maria Domenica.

Filippo’s ancestry, so far, has been traced back to the early 1700s.  His father’s ancestors were born in Farindola to at least that point in history.  His mother’s ancestors encompass at least three midwives, not including his sister, and a line traced to Montebello di Bertona.  Filippo passed away at #137 Trosciano, Farindola in 1916.

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Pecorino di Farindola

*Maria Giuseppa married Panfilo Zenone.  This is one way we are related to the Zenone cousins.

**Domenico is the sibling of Filippo through which we are related to the Romagna cousins and again to the Zenone cousins.

Sources: 

Antenati San Beniculturali – Archivio di Stato di Pescara (Farindola, Penne, Montebello di Bertona)

Archivio di Stato di Teramo records on Family Search (Bacucco (Arsita) and Castiglione Messer Raimondo)

Castiglione Messer Raimondo microfilms

 

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Immigrant #25 Great Great Grandmother Filomena Napolitano Ferraro

Filomena Napolitano was born in 1845 in Nola, Campania and immigrated to the United States, through Ellis Island in 1904 with her daughters and second son, my great grandfather Carmine Ferraro.  The title of this posting uses her husband’s last name after Napolitano because it was used on her death record in Columbus.  Had she stayed in Italy, she would have always been known as Filomena “Napolitano” because Italian women never change their surnames. In fact, Filomena arrived at Ellis Island as Napolitano as you can see on the Lombardia’s passenger manifest from April 28,1904.  manifestamferraro

I have written in the past on Filomena, Nola, and anything I could find on her father’s side: Carmine Ferraro’s Mother Filomena Napolitano from Nola, Napoli, Campania.

A post about the two headstones associated with her in the Mount Calvary Cemetery is here.  In case you are wondering, the cemetery still has no explanation on why she has two and why they are in separate places in the cemetery. This is her Find-a-Grave Memorial.

The following posts have already been written on her immigrant children:

Immigrant #5 ~ The Disappearing Antonio Ferraro

The Gift of a Genealogy Goldmine (An update on Antonio)

Immigrant #2: Angela Maria Ferraro Valerioti – Mother of a Renowned NYC Investigator and a NYC Refuse Company President

Immigrant #9 ~ Carmine A. Ferraro, Priest and Maestro

Immigrant #23 ~ Great Grand Aunt Elena Ferraro Scarnecchia

Two more immigrant children, Giovanina, and Gelsomina Ferraro Ciocco will be featured in upcoming weeks.

The post detailing her immigrant husband Angelo can be found here.

An earlier posting about her parents’ wedding is here:  On this day in 1842…

For approximately the past six months I have been researching Filomena’s mother’s interesting family, the Sabatinos from Sirico (now Saviano), Napoli, Campania, Italy.  They have been extremely easy to research, especially because Sirico was such a small town and appeared to have some money.  I literally have binders and files and piles of records from the microfilmed Sirico records from the Naples State Archives.  Filomena’s mother was Maria Michela Sabatino, born in 1809 in Sirico on Strada Napolitano, and at the time of her birth, her father Giaocchino was a sartore or tailor and was literate.  No, there is likely no connection between the Strada Napolitano and Maria Michela’s future husband – a Napolitano.  The surname is incredibly common in Campania.  Maria Michela’s mother was Santa di Conza and she was from Salerno.  I am patiently waiting for Salerno records to be put on Antenati.  Maria Michela appears to be the oldest of their eight children.

In the 1810s Giaocchino moved to being a vendittore di Piazza (seller on the Piazza), a tavernaro (tavernkeeper), and a bottegaro (shopkeeper).*  By 1822, Maria Michela’s father Giaocchino was a possidente or wealthy property owner.  He always seemed to be hanging around weddings in the town too signing as a witness where I found out about his wealthiest profession – possidente.  The signature of the man Giaocchino Sabatino was the same signature on his 1810s children’s birth.  I have an entire file of records that contain his signature.  One more thing I noticed in Sirico, all the literate Sabatinos of Sirico, too, spelled their surname with ONLY ONE ‘b’ when they signed their names.  ANNNNDDDDD, at one point in Sirico’s history, there was a Strada Sabatino according to the records.

possidente

Giaocchino Sabatino’s parents were Bartolomeo, a maestro sartore or master tailor, and Cecilia di Falco, an ostetrice or midwife.  That makes Filomena’s great grandmother from Sirico a midwife.  Giaocchino’s younger brother Lorenzo Sabatino was also a possidente and was Il Sindaco or mayor of Sirico from 1860-1861. 

From what I could find, Giaocchino only had brothers and from what I can surmise from viewing the town records, they were literate and educated like Giaocchino.  Their names and professions are as follows:

Federigo-calzolaio-shoemaker, vendittore di vino, industriante-trader m. Maria Felicia Ambruscino

Allesandro-sartore m. Domenica Vardolo

Giuseppe-sartore m. Marta D’Avella

Lorenzo-sartore, industriante, possidente, Il Sindaco m. Maria Giuseppa Tuzzolli

Giaocchino Sabatino died in 1847 in Ospedale degli Incurabili in Naples.  This is the Wikipedia link to this historical hospital with photos.  I found a reference to his death in that hospital on his son’s wedding record which I then located on Antenati.  Follow this link to his death record from the San Lorenzo quartiere of Napoli on Antenati.

As for Cecilia di Falco, she was born around 1763 in Sirico and I found many records about her and the babies she delivered.  She is the first midwife on my mother’s side.  Therefore, there will be more on the Midwife of Sirico as a later date…

Sources:

Ellis Island

Nola:  These microfilms

Sirico: All of these films

Antenati

I used this Roots Web link to help with older Italian occupations I found on microfilm.

*Some of the occupations found on the microfilms in Sirico were in the Neapolitan dialect. 

cinziarosagenealogy@comcast.net