Today’s Anniversary ~ Serafina Iannascoli and Antonio Cirone

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Farindola – On today’s date in 1845, my third great grandparents Serafina Iannascoli and Antonio Cirone, contadini, were married in San Nicola di Bari Church in the presence of Domenico Falconetti and Giuseppe Marzola.  Two days prior, they were married in the Farindola town hall in the presence of the mayor Nicola Valentini and the following:

Nicodemo Giancola, 31, landowner;

Vincenzo Giancola, 39, landowner;

Domenico Frattarola, 56, landowner; and

Vincenzo Carusi, 67, fornaio.

This is the link to their marriage record- #1 Matrimoni Farindola 1845.

Serafina Iannascoli was born in 1822 to Natale Iannascoli and Maria Giuseppa Salvitti.  They too were contadini.  Maria Giuseppa’s father Domenico Lorenzo Salvitti was born in Fara San Martino, Chieti.  Domenico Lorenzo Salvitti had a brother named Giuseppe who married Maria Rosa Cirone.*  Their son was named Donato Salvitti and he became the mayor of Farindola in the mid 1800s.

Antonio Cirone was born in 1820 to Domenico Cirone and Maria Fragassi.  Maria Fragassi’s father was Domenico Fragassi and his occupation was sometimes recorded as artista and other times as tarcaro in the Farindola records I located on Antenati.  I found a 1784 baptismal record in the Farindola marriage processetti on Antenati where the priest had transcribed the Fragassi surname as Fracasso.  Perhaps Fracasso was the spelling at one point.  This is a link to that record.  The furthest I could go in the ancestry of Antonio Cirone on Antenati found all of his ancestry in Farindola.

CironeIannascoli

Antonio Cirone died in 1879 at Contrada Piazzetta in Farindola, while Serafina Iannascoli died in 1901 in Macchie, the birthplace of my great grandmother Serafina Merlenghi.

They were grandparents of Serafina Merlenghi.  In all likelihood, her grandmother is her namesake.

*Maria Rosa Cirone is the sister of my 5th great grandfather Pasquale Nicola Cirone, another ancestor of Serafina Merlenghi.  Cirone is an extremely common surname in the town.  

Source: http://antenati.san.beniculturali.it/home

 

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Today’s Anniversary ~ Anna Emidia Lucerini and Luigi di Francesco ~

This year my challenge is to post the marriage documents of all 16 sets of 3rd great grandparents on both sides of my ancestry on their anniversary.  The first wedding anniversary is below.  san-nicola-di-bari

Farindola – On this day in 1853, my 3rd great grandparents Anna Emidia Lucerini and Luigi di Francesco were married in San Nicola di Bari church in Farindola in the presence of Vincenzo Carusi and Tomasso Tommalino, and in the town hall in the presence of:

Don Giacomo Mascioli, 53, landowner;

Nicodemo Giancola, 38, landowner;

Gennaro Barbarossa, 53, contadino; and

Antonio di Luca, 60, contadino.

(Descendants of Nicodemo Giancola and his wife, Maria Domenica Sciarra, are distant cousins and live in the United States today.  Nicodemo Giancola married Maria Grazia Sciarra, daughter of Giuseppe Antonio Sciarra.  He was the brother of Maria Domenica Sciarra  -> wife of Giuseppe Antonio Marcella->4th great grandparents of the author.)

food

Both Anna Emidia and Biagio were contadini and born to contadini in Farindola, Italy.

This is the link to their marriage record: Atto #1 Matrimoni Farindola, 1853.

Anna Emidia Lucerini was born in 1830 to Antonio Lucerini and Giovanna Damiani.  I had an idea that Anna Emidia was born around 1830 because I had found her 1907 death record.  After I found the marriage of her parents in 1825, I began to find the births of her siblings.  In 1830, I found a male child named Emidio born to Antonio Lucerini and Giovanna Damiani.

I continued to find more siblings of Anna Emidia, but could not locate her birth record on Antenati!  She was one of at least 12 children born to Antonio and Giovanna.  I thought perhaps she was born in a neighboring town.  But, right before I found her marriage to Luigi, I found a document in the 1852 Farindola Diversi records titled “Atto di rettifica di nome di Anna Emidia Lucerini,” written by il Sindaco Nicola Cirone.  Please click here to go to Atto #10 in the Farindola 1852 Diversi.

Anna Emidia Lucerini had no brother named Emidio.  She was the baby whose birth was recorded June 25, 1830 in the Farindola town hall as male child named Emidio.  Please follow this link to see that original record numbered 60 from Farindola in 1830.

What went on there?!  At the noon hour on the 25th of June, Antonio Lucerini, father of Anna Emidia, went to town hall and is recorded as having told the mayor, Serafino Pompei, that his wife had a baby boy at their house they named Emidio.  The baby was baptized the same day at San Nicola di Bari.  This was declared in the presence of Luigi Ammazzalorsco and Giuseppe Cirone.  Serafino read it to them because all present were illiterate and his was the only signature on the document.

Maybe Serafino didn’t read it aloud to all present.  Was Antonio drunk?  At noon?  Probably not…

On Anna Emidia’s mother Giovanna Damiani’s side she can trace her ancestry all the way back to 3 sets of 7th greats in Farindola named Pietro Paolucci – Irene Lepore, Domenico Rosa – Laura Lacchetta, and Nicola Di Francesco – Restude Di Nino.

Luigi Di Francesco was born in 1825 in Farindola to Filippo Di Francesco and Angela Nicola D’Angelo Sopranome Zagliocco.  I wondered if he was born in Rione Trosciano since his father died there, he himself died there, and he had his children with Anna Emidia there.  I am unsure.

His father’s ancestry goes all the way back to a Felice Di Francesco who had children with Anna Del Priore living in Farindola sometime in the mid 1700s and even before that on his father’s mother’s side to 7th great grandparents Rinaldo Bucci – Emilia Tinacci, Remauldo Di Simone – a lady named Lucia.

Tree Image

Please note the above snipped tree image does not show all of the 7th greats in the tree and that Anna Emidia’s great grandmother was Anna Saveria Di Francesco (last name at the bottom right corner).  I suppose, it is a possibility she was related to Felice Di Francesco (first name at the top right corner.)

Luigi Di Francesco’s mother Angela Nicola D’Angelo Zagliocco was born in Penne, Pescara.  Filippo Di Francesco went there to marry her.  I spent some time near Christmas and Thanksgiving looking at a lot of Penne records.  D’Angelo is an extremely common surname in Italy.  In Penne, in this time period, it looks like D’Angelo families had a sopranome attached to it.  She and her father and brothers both had the sopranome Zagliocco, while there is evidence that her grandfather may have been the Francesco D’Angelo alias “Il Nibbio.”

Penne

If this Francesco D’Angelo alias pans out, Angela Nicola D’Angelo Zagliocco would descend from Biase D’Angelo alias “Il Nibbio” and Beatrice Triozzi who were probably born around 1700 in Penne.  I would love to know how they got the sopranomes and the aliases!

Luigi Di Francesco died in 1898 in Trosciano as did Anna Emidia in 1907.  They were the parents of  Biagio Di Francesco and the grandparents of Paolo Di Francesco.

Source:

http://antenati.san.beniculturali.it/home

Last year my genealogy blog challenge was to find and record every immigrant in my tree.  That challenge is nearly half-way completed.  I will continue to do it until I find every last one.  

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Today’s Wedding Anniversary ~~ Filippo Marcella and Elisabetta Rossi ~~

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On this day 124 years ago in Farindola, Italy, Elisabetta Rossi married Filippo Marcella.  They were the parents of my great grandfather Cesidio.

marriagetitleElisabetta Rossi was born in 1866 in Valleceraso, Bacucco, Teramo, a neighboring town, to Giuseppe Antonio Rossi and Anna Antonia Ricci.

arsita
The valley outside Bacucco (Arsita), Teramo

Her parents had moved to Farindola before the marriage of their oldest child, Elisabetta.  Elisabetta’s father was originally from Penne, Pescara, having been born there.  I was able to trace back to 6th great grandparents in the Rossi line born around 1740 in Penne.  Giuseppe’s father Domenico was literate and I have a few of his signatures saved.  The one below is from his son’s marriage to Elisabetta’s mother, Anna Antonia Ricci, in Bacucco in 1865.

DomenicoRossiSignature

Anna Antonia Ricci was born in Castiglione Messer Raimondo, Teramo.  However her parents were also born and married in Penne, Pescara.  I was able to trace the Ricci back to the mid 1700s in Penne too, to another set of 6th great grandparents.  The Ricci married a member of the Delle Monache family through which I was able to trace to a set of 7th great grandparents born around 1700.  They were Anastasio Delle Monache and a lady named Lorenza.

My great great grandmother Elisabetta Rossi was the oldest child and had at least 7 siblings: Antonio, Palma, Domenico, Maria Carmina, Giovanni, Anna Domenica, and Girolamo.

Antenati link to Elisabetta’s and Filippo’s marriage

Antenati link to their marriage allegati

Elisabetta married Filippo Marcella, a man who was a widower, and also 23 years older than she was.  Coincidentally, I noticed on the birth records of Filippo’s children to Elisabetta that his age somehow decrease with each record!

Filippo was born in 1844 in Trosciano, Farindola, Pescara to Massimo Nicola Marcella and Maria Carolina Colangeli.  Through miracles of modern Google Earth, this is a clipped image of Contrada Trosciano in Farindola.

trosciano

Filippo’s first wife was Maria Antonia Lacchetta, the daughter of Filippo Lacchetta and Maria Salzetta.  Maria Antonia had passed away in April of 1893 and Filippo Marcella was left with small children to raise. We don’t know the circumstances of her death but she had given birth to at least 11 children in 20 years.  Some of the children didn’t survive a few days or past infancy.

Filippo’s children with Maria Antonia were: Carmela (died in infancy), Cesidio (died in infancy), Maria Grazia, Donato (died in infancy), Bambino (stillborn), Andrea, Carmine, Raffaele, Pasqua, Filomena, Serafina.

Elisabetta’s first born was my great grandfather Cesidio.  Her other children were Maria Domenica, Antonia Vincenza, and Antonio Andrea.

Filippo Marcella was the fourth of ten children.  He had two sets of twin sisters.  The first set passed away in their childhoods.  He also had a brother that passed away in his childhood.  The siblings that survived to adulthood are as follows: Maria Giustina, Maria Giuseppa (midwife)*, Domenico**, Nicola (Antonio), and the second set of twins Serafina and Maria Domenica.

Filippo’s ancestry, so far, has been traced back to the early 1700s.  His father’s ancestors were born in Farindola to at least that point in history.  His mother’s ancestors encompass at least three midwives, not including his sister, and a line traced to Montebello di Bertona.  Filippo passed away at #137 Trosciano, Farindola in 1916.

pecorino-di-ferindola-cheese
Pecorino di Farindola

*Maria Giuseppa married Panfilo Zenone.  This is one way we are related to the Zenone cousins.

**Domenico is the sibling of Filippo through which we are related to the Romagna cousins and again to the Zenone cousins.

Sources: 

Antenati San Beniculturali – Archivio di Stato di Pescara (Farindola, Penne, Montebello di Bertona)

Archivio di Stato di Teramo records on Family Search (Bacucco (Arsita) and Castiglione Messer Raimondo)

Castiglione Messer Raimondo microfilms

 

Immigrant #27 ~ Great Grand Aunt Giovania Ferraro ~ What Happened to You?

My great grandfather Carmine Ferraro had 5 siblings and they all immigrated to the United States.  Unfortunately, there is very little known about his last sibling Giovania, his youngest.  At present, Giovania is only found in two records in America.  The first is in the 1905 New York State Census by name and age, and the second is in the 1932 Leavenworth prison file as a reference.  There is no oral history on this sibling either.

Giovania was not on the 1904 passenger manifest of her mother and sisters.  Since her mother and sisters were detained, the tally of detained and released passengers at the end of the roll of records from the National Archives specifically divulges 3 children over the age of 1 were released with mother Filomena Napolitano.  Giovania would have been about 14 at that time.  I plainly do not know when Giovania got here.  I cannot figure out how or with whom Giovania came to America period.

In 1905, Giovania was living in Brooklyn with her three sisters and parents, according to the New York State Census.  That record showed she was born in Italy, 15 years old, and did housework.  This is the only record I ever found that gave an idea of her name and an approximate year of birth. Ancestry indexers incorrectly transcribed her name as Guarania!  

 

GiovaniaCensus1905
Giovania is at the bottom.

 

Carmine’s Leavenworth prison file references the fact, in his social interview, that he was 1 of 6 children and only 4 were alive.  The current residence of each of his siblings was listed.  By my research, Angela Maria Ferraro Valerioti was deceased.  Giovania Ferraro had to have been the other deceased sibling.

I could not find Giovania in the New York City Municipal death index, nor anywhere in Columbus, Ohio where parents Angelo Ferraro and Filomena Napolitano had moved by 1907.   She would only have been about 17 at that point.  To give you my honest opinion, I think her first or last name was corrupted on an American record, possibly in the above census, and any further proof of her in the United States may be impossible right now until more records become available.  I hope I am wrong about the corruption of her name.  Technically her name should be Giovanna, right?

I have no idea why Giovania would not be on any passenger manifest.  She definitely didn’t come to America with her father Angelo in 1903.  Also, it just is not possible for me to find her birth record in Naples at this time since 1) I don’t know her birthday and can’t write to Naples for it without it; and 2) Births of the Commune of Naples post 1865 are not online anywhere for researchers.

Could she have gone by a different first name?  Yes, and obviously the common last name poses some search issues as well.  Giovania, what happened to you?

Giovania is the last of Carmine’s siblings whose stories were told here.  The rest can be found in these previous posts:

Immigrant #2: Angela Maria Ferraro Valerioti – Mother of a Renowned NYC Investigator and a NYC Refuse Company President

Immigrant #5 ~ The Disappearing Antonio Ferraro and More on Antonio Ferraro here

Immigrant #23 ~ Great Grand Aunt Elena Ferraro Scarnecchia

Immigrant #26 Gelsomina Ferraro Ciocco ~ Pasta Company Treasurer and Mother of Biostatistician Dr. Antonio Ciocco

 

Update on Available Italian Genealogical Records

As of 11:00 am on August 26th, 2017, any available genealogical records from Italy (save for the Heinzen’s ancestors, the Gentinetta of Bognanco, and Naples births post 1865 for Carmine’s siblings) that I need to access to research either Italian side of my tree will no longer have to be ordered on microfilm!  Any records that aren’t on Antenati San Beniculturali from Italy were made available for viewing on the Family Search website.  Some of those can only be viewed at a Latter Day Saints Center until Antenati in Italy publishes them for viewing online worldwide.  This includes Castiglione Messer Raimondo and Castelli in Teramo, Fara San Martino in Chieti, Nola and Sirico in Napoli, and San Felice a Cancello/Sei Casali d’Arienzo and San Prisco in Caserta.  Farindola and all of Pescara have been on Antenati for years and is accessible in every home.  Since Nola is now available to help identify more ancestors there, I have a feeling that part of the tree will grow to aid in finding relatives of Filomena Napolitano in America.  

Sources:

Ellis Island Passenger Manifests

NY State Census of 1905

Federal records obtained from the National Archives in Kansas

Upcoming Immigrants:

More in the Leies – Bold branch, including the Leies family that went to New York City and the Leies family that beat all of the others here by arriving in 1848.  The immigrants are about halfway complete.

This blog just turned 2!  Thank you readers!

 

If Vito Barbarino and Angela Nicolino Are In Your Tree Twice It Means…Uh Oh

Talanico, San Felice a Cancello, Caserta, Campania – When Vito Barbarino and Angela Nicolino are appearing in your pedigree twice as your forebears, you know two people in your Ferraro ancestry must’ve been related.  It turns out that great great grandfather Immigrant #3 ~ Retired Army Captain and Merchant Angelo Ferraro‘s parents were related because Vito Barbarino and Angela Nicolino from Roccarainola are in his ancestry on both sides of his family.  They were his great great grandparents twice through their daughter Giulia Barbarino – the ancestress of Angelo’s mother Angela Maria Delle Cave and Giovanna Barbarino – the ancestress of Angelo’s father Francesco Antonio Ferraro.

Giulia and Giovanna Barbarino were sisters, both daughters of Vito Barbarino and Angela Nicolino.

 

GiuliaBarbarinop.33.1259SPA.1696Bapt
Baptism of Giulia Barbarino, 1696, San Pietro Apostolo, Talanico, San Felice a Cancello

 

This all makes the parents of Angelo Ferraro third cousins.

Vito Barbarino and Angela Nicolino began to appear in the Talanico, San Felice a Cancello’s San Pietro Apostolo’s church records around 1690, with the notation that they were from a parish of Roccarainola, which is about 5 miles from the ancestral town of Angelo’s parents, San Felice a Cancello.

What can be gleaned from the online church records from the Diocese of Acerra concerning the Barbarinos is that their son Giacomo Antonio was at one point contributing the largest amount of tomolo of grain in tithes to the parish of San Leonardo in San Felice a Cancello.  Tomolo is an old Southern Italian measurement.

You can see the from pedigree of both parents of Angelo that, yep Barbarino and Nicolino are indeed in each one.

AMDelleCavePedigreeFAFerraropedigree

Giulia Barbarino married Lorenzo Delle Cave in 1721.  Giovanna Barbarino married Leonardo De Lardo in 1716.  Descendants of both sisters married approximately 100 years later and had Angelo Ferraro.

So.  They were related.  At least they weren’t 1st cousins HA!

Sources:

San Pietro Apostolo, Diocese of Acerra

San Leonardo, Diocese of Acerra

San Felice a Cancello, Civil Records

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Back to the immigrants.  #26.

Immigrant #25 Great Great Grandmother Filomena Napolitano Ferraro

Filomena Napolitano was born in 1845 in Nola, Campania and immigrated to the United States, through Ellis Island in 1904 with her daughters and second son, my great grandfather Carmine Ferraro.  The title of this posting uses her husband’s last name after Napolitano because it was used on her death record in Columbus.  Had she stayed in Italy, she would have always been known as Filomena “Napolitano” because Italian women never change their surnames. In fact, Filomena arrived at Ellis Island as Napolitano as you can see on the Lombardia’s passenger manifest from April 28,1904.  manifestamferraro

I have written in the past on Filomena, Nola, and anything I could find on her father’s side: Carmine Ferraro’s Mother Filomena Napolitano from Nola, Napoli, Campania.

A post about the two headstones associated with her in the Mount Calvary Cemetery is here.  In case you are wondering, the cemetery still has no explanation on why she has two and why they are in separate places in the cemetery. This is her Find-a-Grave Memorial.

The following posts have already been written on her immigrant children:

Immigrant #5 ~ The Disappearing Antonio Ferraro

The Gift of a Genealogy Goldmine (An update on Antonio)

Immigrant #2: Angela Maria Ferraro Valerioti – Mother of a Renowned NYC Investigator and a NYC Refuse Company President

Immigrant #9 ~ Carmine A. Ferraro, Priest and Maestro

Immigrant #23 ~ Great Grand Aunt Elena Ferraro Scarnecchia

Two more immigrant children, Giovanina, and Gelsomina Ferraro Ciocco will be featured in upcoming weeks.

The post detailing her immigrant husband Angelo can be found here.

An earlier posting about her parents’ wedding is here:  On this day in 1842…

For approximately the past six months I have been researching Filomena’s mother’s interesting family, the Sabatinos from Sirico (now Saviano), Napoli, Campania, Italy.  They have been extremely easy to research, especially because Sirico was such a small town and appeared to have some money.  I literally have binders and files and piles of records from the microfilmed Sirico records from the Naples State Archives.  Filomena’s mother was Maria Michela Sabatino, born in 1809 in Sirico on Strada Napolitano, and at the time of her birth, her father Giaocchino was a sartore or tailor and was literate.  No, there is likely no connection between the Strada Napolitano and Maria Michela’s future husband – a Napolitano.  The surname is incredibly common in Campania.  Maria Michela’s mother was Santa di Conza and she was from Salerno.  I am patiently waiting for Salerno records to be put on Antenati.  Maria Michela appears to be the oldest of their eight children.

In the 1810s Giaocchino moved to being a vendittore di Piazza (seller on the Piazza), a tavernaro (tavernkeeper), and a bottegaro (shopkeeper).*  By 1822, Maria Michela’s father Giaocchino was a possidente or wealthy property owner.  He always seemed to be hanging around weddings in the town too signing as a witness where I found out about his wealthiest profession – possidente.  The signature of the man Giaocchino Sabatino was the same signature on his 1810s children’s birth.  I have an entire file of records that contain his signature.  One more thing I noticed in Sirico, all the literate Sabatinos of Sirico, too, spelled their surname with ONLY ONE ‘b’ when they signed their names.  ANNNNDDDDD, at one point in Sirico’s history, there was a Strada Sabatino according to the records.

possidente

Giaocchino Sabatino’s parents were Bartolomeo, a maestro sartore or master tailor, and Cecilia di Falco, an ostetrice or midwife.  That makes Filomena’s great grandmother from Sirico a midwife.  Giaocchino’s younger brother Lorenzo Sabatino was also a possidente and was Il Sindaco or mayor of Sirico from 1860-1861. 

From what I could find, Giaocchino only had brothers and from what I can surmise from viewing the town records, they were literate and educated like Giaocchino.  Their names and professions are as follows:

Federigo-calzolaio-shoemaker, vendittore di vino, industriante-trader m. Maria Felicia Ambruscino

Allesandro-sartore m. Domenica Vardolo

Giuseppe-sartore m. Marta D’Avella

Lorenzo-sartore, industriante, possidente, Il Sindaco m. Maria Giuseppa Tuzzolli

Giaocchino Sabatino died in 1847 in Ospedale degli Incurabili in Naples.  This is the Wikipedia link to this historical hospital with photos.  I found a reference to his death in that hospital on his son’s wedding record which I then located on Antenati.  Follow this link to his death record from the San Lorenzo quartiere of Napoli on Antenati.

As for Cecilia di Falco, she was born around 1763 in Sirico and I found many records about her and the babies she delivered.  She is the first midwife on my mother’s side.  Therefore, there will be more on the Midwife of Sirico as a later date…

Sources:

Ellis Island

Nola:  These microfilms

Sirico: All of these films

Antenati

I used this Roots Web link to help with older Italian occupations I found on microfilm.

*Some of the occupations found on the microfilms in Sirico were in the Neapolitan dialect. 

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Today’s Wedding Anniversary: Biagio Di Francesco and Marianna Di Pendima

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Farindola~~June 17, 1888.  On this day in 1888 my great great grandparents Biagio Di Francesco and Marianna Di Pendima were married in Farindola, Pescara.  They were both contadini and the parents of my great grandfather Paolo Di Francesco.

Biagio was born on January 15, 1866 in Trosciano, Farindola to Luigi Di Francesco and Anna Emidia Lucerini.  His birth record starts at the bottom of this page. Both of his parents were born in Farindola.   Marianna was born on March 17, 1868 in Cupoli, Farindola to Carlo Di Pentima from Via Piana, Pianella and Nicola Antonia (di) Giansante from Rione del San Giovanni, Penne.  Marianna’s birth.

The witnesses to their marriage were Clemente de Bernardinis, 43, Secretary (Municipal), and Domenico Ammazalorzco, 48, Country Guard (Municipal).

Follow this link to their marriage document.

Follow this link to their marriage allegati.

Biagio and Marianna welcomed their first child, Filomena, a little less than 9 months later.  She died in infancy.  Using other Farindola records on Antenati, I found that they went on to have at least 5 more children, and a stillborn.  One son, named Zopito, emigrated to Canada.  A daughter named Vincenza was born in 1890 and died in Farindola in 1954.

A son named Alfonso was born in 1892 and was a soldier in the 156 Regiment during World War 1 and died on August 12, 1915 from wounds received at Monte Cappuccio at the Second Battle of the Isonzo.  His death record was on Antenati here because his parents requested information on their son from the Italian Army.  In 1917, his military death record was sent from Rome to his parents and filed in the town records which I was able to access on Antenati.

 

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from Cadutigrandeguerra.it

 

My great grandfather Paolo Di Francesco was born in 1897.  On July 15, 1915, he was called to military service in World War I and served in the 30th Artillery Regiment of the Infrantry.  He was released from service in 1919.  He and his future wife Luigia Maria Massei named a son Alfonso.

Biagio and Marianna had a son named Luigi who was born in 1899.  He died in 1923 shortly after marrying Maria Vinci.  Biagio died in 1923 as well at 29 Via Rossetti, Farindola.  His death record is here.  Marianna Di Pendima lived at least until 1928 because I have not located her death record in Farindola.

A Bit About the Parents of Marianna Di Pendima

Marianna’s mother Nicola Antonia (di) Giansante’s grandparents were Saverio Di Giansante and Domenica Andreoli.  Saverio could write, and I have his signature from his son’s wedding record in Penne.  They were contadini as well.

Saverios sig

Saverio died in Penne but was born in Carpineto della Nora, Pescara, which is a few miles south of Farindola.  Saverio’s death. Saverio and Domenica have a lot of descendants researching them and I run into more and more people wondering if that is why our DNA matches, etc.  They are only in my tree once but in my Canadian cousins’ tree twice!  As I am typing this I am asking myself why I have not yet researched Carpineto della Nora on Antenati!

Marianna’s father Carlo Di Pentima was born in Pianella and was a contadino.  Carlo’s birth is on the left. Pianella is a few miles southeast of Farindola.  In Pianella, the surname is spelled with a ‘t’ and not the ‘d’ they gave it in Farindola.  I had to keep that in mind when I was looking at indexes.   I have been researching Pianella the past week and the town seems larger than Farindola. In the late 1700s Pianella had a colony of Albanians according to the Farindola history I found on this Farindolesi’s website.  I love that website.

 

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Paolo Di Francesco, Biagio and Marianna’s son

 

The research continues…Wouldn’t it be something if I found an Albanian surname in my tree?

Sources: Antenati, Cadutigrandeguerra.it, Archivio di Stato di Teramo, Zia C.

cinziarosagenealogy@comcast.net

 

 

 

 

In Which My AncestryDNA is Starting to Make Sense

My siblings love to hear what my DNA results are but they don’t want to get to get tested even though Ancestry keeps having sales.  I choose not to broadcast my results anymore because if they don’t want to know why my test doesn’t show that I am not 100% European and shows 12% something else, then, never mind.  Nor will I tell them how much Scandinavian or Iberian came up.  I do know that I don’t have South Asian DNA but someone we are related to does and that is likely a sign of Roma ancestry in that person.

I was contacted recently by a user with a shared match that had an adoptee in their ancestry.  So I have been looking more closely at my DNA on Ancestry.  I am still learning how to use AncestryDNA, and after a year and a half, by looking at my matches and grouping them together with my shared matches by surnames and birthplaces, I know for sure that I am related to my mother, because I match her first cousin and second cousins on both sides of her family, and I am also related to my father because of the Cirone  and Cacciatore matches.

Ancestry started something new this past spring called “Genetic Communities” in an effort, no doubt, to sell more DNA tests.  Genetic Communities are “groups of AncestryDNA customers who are connected… most likely because they descend from a population of common ancestors…For example some trace their roots back to groups of people who were isolated geographically…”  Source:  ANCESTRY.COM.

So, are you ready for my two genetic communities?   Here is my first:

genetic community
Italians in Umbria, Abruzzo & Molise

Here is the closeup:

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My second genetic community is…

dun

dunnn

dunnnnnnnnnnnnnn…..

Southern Italians in which I have 35 DNA matches.

Surprised by either one?  No?  Then AncestryDNA got something right because the most recent immigrants in my tree were:  a parent from Abruzzo and a great grandparent from Campania.  Or maybe the Abruzzese and Campanian genetic makeup are similar?  I don’t know.  12.5% DNA from my Campanian great grandparent is a small amount to put me in the Southern Italian community that easily.  In case you are interested, the other people in the family that had DNA tests at Ancestry (and my family reading this knows who those people are) are not showing up in either of these Italian Genetic Communities.

-pace

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Today’s Birthday ~ Angela Maria di Massimo in Macchie, Farindola ~ My Second Great Grandmother

FarindolaToday’s birthday is Angela Maria di Massimo, born in 1871 at 10 a.m. in Macchie, Farindola, Pescara.  She was the mother of my great grandmother Maria Luigia Massei.

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Angela MariadiMassimoPart2

  -Number 58-

-Angela Maria di Massimo-

The year 1871, day 7 of the month of June at hour 12, at the town hall, announced to me Massimo Ferri, Secretary of this Comune di Farindola, Penne Circuit, Province of Teramo, delegated, the Civil State Official, with the act of the Mayor dated the 20th of July last year, from the Procuratore of the King, appeared Donato di Massimo, of the living Serafino and the deceased Angela Maria Colangeli (Angela Maria Cecilia Colangeli), of 26 years, occupation contadino, living as a resident in Farindola, who presents a baby of the feminine gender, that he says was born on the 7th of the current month at the 10th hour to his wife Anna Domenica Cacciatore, daughter of the living Sabatino and the deceased Antonia Uriani (Oriani/Auriano), of 25 years, with whom he resides in their house in this Comune di Farindola at contrada Macchie, to this daughter he says he has given the name Angela Maria.

The above was declared and was also presented to me by Vincenzo Colangeli of the living Mattia of 37 years of the profession contadino and living as a resident in Farindola and of Costantino Massei (my third great grandfather and future father-in-law of Angela Maria di Massimo), of the living Sabatino of 39 years of the profession of contadino also living as a resident in Farindola.

The rest of the document says something to the effect of “the above act is presented and read to all of those present because they are illiterate.”

Signed: Civil State Officer Delegate

Massimo Ferri

Source: Antenati/Archivio di Stato di Pescara: Stato Civile Italiano, Farindola, Nati 1871 Numero 58

We know from other documents retrievable at Antenati that Angela Maria’s mother Anna Domenica Cacciatore was born in Penne.  Her father Donato di Massimo was born at a place in Farindola area called the Colle della Castagna.  I would love to figure out where that spot is on a map of Farindola.  Donato’s mother Angela Maria Cecilia Colangeli, for whom my second great grandmother was named, was born in Montebello di Bertona, a neighboring village.

Another map of Farindola

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The Gift of a Genealogy Goldmine

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The gift of a “genealogy goldmine.”  When the clipped newspaper articles are practically crumbling in your hands, you are viewing photos of people born in the 19th century, and the scent of paper older than 100 years lingers in the air, you know you were gifted the “genealogy goldmine.”  That is what my mother’s cousin – a Ferraro cousin – gifted me the other day.  You probably saw the photo of Angelo Ferraro on Facebook wearing the top hat and his Italian military medals with the explanation from the Italian article describing his military campaigns.  That piece of gold and the stories she shared were the best part!

Someone in the family kept clippings, pictures, and programs related to these early Italian immigrants in my ancestry.  I am guessing this collection of memorabilia may have been started by my great grandmother Helen and continued by one of my great aunts after she passed.  There are many names in the “goldmine” I have heard, but can now put into context in the music industry.  Not to mention, there is another little mystery surrounding Immigrant #3 ~ Retired Army Captain and Merchant Angelo Ferraro and who he may have been working for in New York City before he passed away in Ohio in 1926.  More on that later after I sort it out.

Do you remember Immigrant #5 ~ The Disappearing Antonio Ferraro, brother of Carmine?  Well, I found a clue about Antonio, Gerry Valerioti (the husband of Angela Maria Ferraro), and Angelo Scarnecchia (husband of Elena Ferraro).

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In 1910, my great grandfather and 6 other Italians apparently formed the Italo-American Forwarding Company in Chicago.  The description of the company in the torn pages from a publication we will never be able to name describes it as an import/export business that specifically specializes in Italian, French, and Spanish goods.  They claimed to have a New York office.  In the 1910 Chicago Census, Carmine was listed as a fruit broker.  Perhaps the Italo-American Forwarding Company imported produce.  You can see Gerry Valerioti and Angelo Scarnecchia were members of the incorporation and Antonio Ferraro is the Vice President!  Could Antonio have been in charge of the New York part of this enterprise?  Maybe he really spent time in Chicago?

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Antonio is the Vice President of the company

Another clue I found on Antonio was a translated copy of a letter Carmine wrote to Antonio on February 1, 1948 that was sent to the “Augustinian College” at Santa Rita del Carmine, in Aversa, Caserta.  Was Antonio really the religious brother then?  What does this mean then about abandoning wife Elisa?  Below is a current photo of the Complesso del Carmine in Aversa.

ComplessoThe Augustinians left in 1959 and the complex closed in 1980 after it was damaged by an earthquake.  If you are wondering where Aversa is, it is a town about 5 miles outside of Napoli.

So now we know where Antonio was in the 1940s.  Did he have a family in Italy?  What was going on with this guy?  We now know he lived until at least 1948.  Could unraveling the next little mystery about my second great grandfather Angelo Ferraro lead us to another clue on Antonio in New York City?  Maybe.

The discoveries in my cousin’s gift continue!

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