Today’s Wedding Anniversary ~~ Filippo Marcella and Elisabetta Rossi ~~

cropped-farindola.jpg

On this day 124 years ago in Farindola, Italy, Elisabetta Rossi married Filippo Marcella.  They were the parents of my great grandfather Cesidio.

marriagetitleElisabetta Rossi was born in 1866 in Valleceraso, Bacucco, Teramo, a neighboring town, to Giuseppe Antonio Rossi and Anna Antonia Ricci.

arsita
The valley outside Bacucco (Arsita), Teramo

Her parents had moved to Farindola before the marriage of their oldest child, Elisabetta.  Elisabetta’s father was originally from Penne, Pescara, having been born there.  I was able to trace back to 6th great grandparents in the Rossi line born around 1740 in Penne.  Giuseppe’s father Domenico was literate and I have a few of his signatures saved.  The one below is from his son’s marriage to Elisabetta’s mother, Anna Antonia Ricci, in Bacucco in 1865.

DomenicoRossiSignature

Anna Antonia Ricci was born in Castiglione Messer Raimondo, Teramo.  However her parents were also born and married in Penne, Pescara.  I was able to trace the Ricci back to the mid 1700s in Penne too, to another set of 6th great grandparents.  The Ricci married a member of the Delle Monache family through which I was able to trace to a set of 7th great grandparents born around 1700.  They were Anastasio Delle Monache and a lady named Lorenza.

My great great grandmother Elisabetta Rossi was the oldest child and had at least 7 siblings: Antonio, Palma, Domenico, Maria Carmina, Giovanni, Anna Domenica, and Girolamo.

Antenati link to Elisabetta’s and Filippo’s marriage

Antenati link to their marriage allegati

Elisabetta married Filippo Marcella, a man who was a widower, and also 23 years older than she was.  Coincidentally, I noticed on the birth records of Filippo’s children to Elisabetta that his age somehow decrease with each record!

Filippo was born in 1844 in Trosciano, Farindola, Pescara to Massimo Nicola Marcella and Maria Carolina Colangeli.  Through miracles of modern Google Earth, this is a clipped image of Contrada Trosciano in Farindola.

trosciano

Filippo’s first wife was Maria Antonia Lacchetta, the daughter of Filippo Lacchetta and Maria Salzetta.  Maria Antonia had passed away in April of 1893 and Filippo Marcella was left with small children to raise. We don’t know the circumstances of her death but she had given birth to at least 11 children in 20 years.  Some of the children didn’t survive a few days or past infancy.

Filippo’s children with Maria Antonia were: Carmela (died in infancy), Cesidio (died in infancy), Maria Grazia, Donato (died in infancy), Bambino (stillborn), Andrea, Carmine, Raffaele, Pasqua, Filomena, Serafina.

Elisabetta’s first born was my great grandfather Cesidio.  Her other children were Maria Domenica, Antonia Vincenza, and Antonio Andrea.

Filippo Marcella was the fourth of ten children.  He had two sets of twin sisters.  The first set passed away in their childhoods.  He also had a brother that passed away in his childhood.  The siblings that survived to adulthood are as follows: Maria Giustina, Maria Giuseppa (midwife)*, Domenico**, Nicola (Antonio), and the second set of twins Serafina and Maria Domenica.

Filippo’s ancestry, so far, has been traced back to the early 1700s.  His father’s ancestors were born in Farindola to at least that point in history.  His mother’s ancestors encompass at least three midwives, not including his sister, and a line traced to Montebello di Bertona.  Filippo passed away at #137 Trosciano, Farindola in 1916.

pecorino-di-ferindola-cheese
Pecorino di Farindola

*Maria Giuseppa married Panfilo Zenone.  This is one way we are related to the Zenone cousins.

**Domenico is the sibling of Filippo through which we are related to the Romagna cousins and again to the Zenone cousins.

Sources: 

Antenati San Beniculturali – Archivio di Stato di Pescara (Farindola, Penne, Montebello di Bertona)

Archivio di Stato di Teramo records on Family Search (Bacucco (Arsita) and Castiglione Messer Raimondo)

Castiglione Messer Raimondo microfilms

 

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Immigrants #32-#34 ~~Great Great Great Grandmother Elisabetha Scheid Bold, her daughters Rosa Bold Ertl, Anna Maria Bold Leies, and their in-laws~~

Recently, I discovered and can confirm that, yes, second great grandmother Emilia Bold’s mother Elisabetha Scheid Bold did come to America, at the age of 57 in 1880, sailing from Rotterdam, Netherlands aboard the ship the Scheidam and died in Manhattan in 1905.  Her daughter Rosa traveled with her.  They traveled in steerage and no profession was listed for either of them.  Through clues in censuses, it appears Elisabetha’s husband, Jacob Scheid, Nunschweiler’s Head Catholic Schoolmaster, had passed away.  Elisabetha came to live with her daughter, Anna Maria Bold, who had been in America for 13 years.

Anna Maria Bold Leies

I find Emilia Bold’s sister intriguing because of the age that she came here alone.  According to church records, Anna Maria Bold was born in 1852 in Busenberg, Germany, a few miles from Nuenschweiler.  At the age of 15, in 1867, Anna Bold’s name appeared in the Hamburg Passenger Lists on the ship named Cimbria sailing for the Port of New York.  Her place of origin was Nunschweiler.  She traveled in steerage.  The passenger listing really specifies her age as 15!  Anna Bold is also listed in the Germans to America index at the age of 15.  Castle Garden lists her as arriving on June 13, 1867 at the age of 15 as well.  The burning question is, did she know anyone on the Cimbria?!  Is there anyone out there researching her that can shed light on this?  What prompted her to leave her home at this age?

AnnaBold
Cimbria’s listing for Anna.  Literacy was not specified.

 

The next year, Anna Bold married Jacob Leies on December 6, 1868 at the age of 16, according to the recently released New York City Marriage Index.  At first I thought this was a mistake that she was marrying at 16 and marrying a Leies.  I actually discounted the index when I first found it.  But no, it is all real and she is really Emilia’s sister.  The marriage index listed the names of Jacob’s parents and also his birthplace as Huberhof – the same farm as second great grandfather Johann Leies.

What is our relationship to Jacob Leies?

Jacob Leies was first cousin to our second great grandfather Johann Leies.  Jacob Leies and Johann Leies shared the same grandparents.  Johann Leies (great great grandfather)  is the husband of Emilia Bold – sister of Anna Maria Bold.  

Jacob Leies was born in Nunschweiler to Johann Jacob Leies and Louisa Catharina Knerr, who immigrated to the United States around 1854 when Jacob was 14.  He and his parents were living in New York City’s 8th Ward at the time of the 1855 New York State Census.  Johann Jacob was listed as a laborer on that census.  The entire Leies family had their surname misspelled as Lyse on that record.

Even though Jacob was about 14 years older than Anna Bold, Anna Bold would have been about the age of 2 when Jacob would have left for America.

Also, Jacob Leies is the brother of Union Soldier Peter Leies, 1841-1862, born in Nunschweiler, Germany and killed at Antietam.  Jacob spent time in the Union Army as well, after his brother’s death at Antietam, in the NY 159th Infantry Regiment.  I have had trouble locating information on Jacob in the Union Army and don’t want to spend the money to order the service records of a first cousin 4 x removed to me no matter how fascinated I am by immigrants in the United States Civil War.

Coincidentally, after the war, Jacob supported Anna and their children as a “manufacturer of artificial limbs.”  That made me wonder if Jacob suffered an injury during the Civil War, so I looked for a pension.  I couldn’t locate proof of one.  The spelling of Leies in most records at this time in America is allover the place as well.  On the other hand, his choice of profession choice could mean nothing.

On to Elisabetha Scheid Bold…

Elisabetha Scheid was born in 1822 in Rodalben to Johann Jacob Scheid and Catharina Buchler according to Rodalben’s Kirkenbuch and Familienbuch.  She married Franz Jacob Bold in Nunschweiler, in 1842 where he was the schoolmaster.  This current blog post is updating some of the facts regarding Elisabetha Scheid in this previous post.

On January 24, 1880, Elisabetha and her youngest daughter, Rosa, arrived in the Port of New York on the ship the Scheidam, which had sailed from Rotterdam, Netherlands.

Scheidam

 

manifest
This is the largest I can make this snippet of their manifest

 

American records point to proof that Elisabetha’s husband Jacob Bold had passed away in Nunschweiler by 1880.  I found an Elisabetha Bold on the 1880 Federal Census living with her daughter Anna and son-in-law Jacob Leies, and their children Mary Ann, Richard Joseph, Louisa, Jacob Aloysius, and Anna.  Her relationship to head of household Jacob was listed as “mother.” The box for widowed/divorced is checked next to Elisabetha’s name.

Back to Anna…

In 1885, Elisabetha’s son-in-law Jacob Leies passed away.  In 1897, Anna Bold Leies passed away.  Anna’s will on Ancestry.com listed all of her children as heirs and a man listed as her cousin Jacob Weinlin, as Executor.

A little on her children:  Anna’s son Jacob Aloysius Leies joined the United States Navy in 1905.  After his service, he was a post office clerk and never married.  Richard was a merchant/salesman according to federal censuses and city directories.  I have been able to trace Richard’s large amount of descendants to the 1990s while I am still trying to track down what happened Anna’s daughters Louisa, Mary Ann, and Anna.

Juliana Rosa Bold Ertl

Rosa (Julian Rosa) Bold was born in 1860 in Nunschweiler.  As stated above, she came to the United States with her mother in 1880.  It is unclear how long she was in New York City.  She was not on the census with her mother in 1880, nor with her Chicago siblings Richard, Alex, and Emilia.

By 1883 though, she is found in Chicago marrying another German immigrant named John Ertl,  They had three children:  Elizabeth, Karl, and John.  She passed away young, on April 4, 1891 in Chicago.

I could only find one of Rosa’s children in adulthood – Elizabeth, whose profession on the 1940 Federal Census was listed as a stenographer for an architect company.  She never married.  I am still searching for her sons.

Back to Elisabetha…

By the time of the 1900 federal census, Elisabetha was living with Jacob Weinlein, his wife Louisa, and their family in New York City.  Elisabetha was listed as “aunt” as to her relationship with the head of household Jacob.  (He is the same man that was the Executor of Anna’s will.) Elisabetha stated she was widowed, a mother of “8” children and when asked if any of her children were living the number was “0.”

I found that number interesting because her son Immigrant #1: Chicago Police Officer Alexander Bold, was still alive.  You may remember that Alexander had a rocky family life and his wife had divorced him on grounds of cruelty.  I suppose it could be that he was estranged from his family. 

I too count 8 children born to Elisabetha in Germany, as follows:

Emilia – born in 1843, died in 1894 in Chicago

Rosalia Maria Magdalena – born in 1846, died as an infant

Catharina Michaelina – born in 1848, died unk.

Helen Catharina – born in 1849, died unk.

Alexander – born in 1850, died in 1910 in Chicago

Anna Maria – born in 1852, died in 1897 in NYC

Richard – born in 1854, died in 1889 in Chicago (have not told his story yet)

Juliana Rosa – born in 1860, died in 1891 in Chicago

 

The census taker wrote “yes” in the block under “Can Speak English” in the 1900 federal census for Elisabetha.

Elisabetha passed away on January 14, 1905 in Manhattan.  Several of her descendants are buried in Gate of Heaven Cemetery in Westchester County, New York.  I wonder if her grave is there also.  I have not located it yet.  The New York Death Index did list her parents as Jacob Scheid and Catharina Bechler.  That is so close to Buchler, there can be no mistake that 3rd great grandmother Elisabetha Scheid Bold came to the United States too.

On this Veteran’s Day weekend, I decided to count the amount of Veterans that I could find descended from Elisabetha Scheid and her husband Franz Jacob Bold.  So far, this is what I have: 1 U.S. Navy Veteran, 1 World War I Veteran, 6 World War II Veterans (3 of which were brothers) including Colonel Gerard M. Leies.

I will find what happened to Rosa’s sons and Anna’s daughters!!!!!!!!

Sources:

Familien – und Seelen-Verzeichnissi fur Pfarrei Rodalben

Rodalben Kirchenbuch

Nunschweiler Catholic Church records via microfilm

Busenberg Catholic Church recrods via Family Search

Hamburg Passenger Lists

New York Passenger Lists

CastleGarden.org

Germans to America

New York State Censuses

United States Federal Censuses

New York City Directories

New York and Chicago birth, marriage, and death indexes

New York State Civil War Muster Rolls

Fold3.com

Various records from National Archives pertaining to the descendants of Richard Leies

 

ecard

 

 

 

Veteran’s Day 2017 ~~~ Colonel Gerard M. Leies ~~~

GerardLeies1988

This year on Veteran’s Day I remember my great uncle Colonel Gerard M. Leies, United Stated Air Force.

Military Commendations:

Air Medal with Two Oak Leaves

Air Force Commendation Medal

Air Force Outstanding Unit Award

 

Great Uncle Gerard attended the University of Chicago and University of California and received a master’s degree in physics after attending Loyola University.

He enlisted in the Air Corp on June 23rd, 1941.  He served as a weather officer for the 13th Bomber Command and 13th Air Force supporting the Guadalcanal and Philippines Liberation campaigns.

He left military service at the end of the war and returned in 1948.  From 1948 to 1950 he served as Special Projects Officer with the Air Weather Service in Washington, D.C.

In 1953 he was assigned to Aeronautical Research Laboratory at Wright – Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton, Ohio, serving as a physicist and then as Chief of the Modern Physics branch.  He and Donald Reynolds developed a solar generator that ran through cadmium sulfide which the Air Force hoped would be used to power homes in the future.  This headline news was picked up by the Associated Press and re-printed across the country in June, 1954.

Uncle Gerard did further work for the Air Force in nuclear physics, solid wastes physics, plasma physics, relativity, and nuclear engineering at the Air Force Technical Applications Center in Orlando, Florida.

In 1962 he was awarded a doctorate from Georgetown University and retired from the Air Force.  He remained active in research for the Air Force as a civilian and expanded his research field to include nucleonics.

 

GerardLeies
Colonel Leies is on the right

 

Uncle Gerard died in 2008.  His obituary attributes him to being one of the nation’s first nuclear physicists.  He is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.

Thank you Colonel Gerard M. Leies

Sources: National Archives, Newspapers.com

 

Immigrant #29 ~ Great Great Grandfather Johann Leies, Chicago Saloon Owner and Piano Dealer ~

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My great great grandfather Johann Leies was born in Nuenschweiler in the German Palatinate in 1843 to farmers Johann Adam Leies and Elisabetha Margaretha Pfeiffer.  He came to America in 1867 and became a naturalized citizen of the United States that same year in Wayne County, Ohio.  Before moving to Chicago and running a saloon, he worked as a farmer, a carpenter, in beer and wine dealing, and married a childhood friend from Nuenschweiler in Wooster, Ohio – Immigrant #24 ~~ Great Great Grandmother Emilia Anna Bold Leies~~and had their children, Alexander, my great grandfather, and John Ferdinand.

Uncle John wrote a lot about this immigrant grandfather of his and even visited the Catholic church in Nuenschweiler to obtain a transcribed copy of his grandfather’s baptism.  The village is about 6 miles from the current day border of Moselle, Lorraine, France.  Johann was born at Huber Hof near Nuenschweiler.  Huber Hof was the name of his great grandfather Michael Conrad’s farm.  Hof originally meant temple or hall in Old Norse.  It later was used for courtyard and eventually for a collection of buildings on a farm.  Source:  Wikipedia.

When Johann was born, the farm had already been inherited by his grandmother Gertruda Conrad.  Information on his estate came from a great source: Intelligenzblatt des Rheinkreises, Volume 7, or Google Books!   Johann was the oldest of at least four children.  The baptismal records of Nuenschweiler are missing a few decades which means there may have been more siblings.

Like me, Uncle John did not know the date or location of Johann’s arrival here, although he left a great trail for the researchers that would come after him.  He thinks he may have entered the country in New Orleans.

I wondered why did Johann go to Wooster, Ohio when I read Uncle John’s research.  This past summer when I found a relation of ours (Union Soldier Peter Leies, 1841-1862, born in Nunschweiler, Germany and killed at Antietam), I began looking for more Leies family members in the Civil War.  That led me to two other first cousins of great great grandfather Johann that were drafted during the Civil War in Ohio – Henry and Anthony Leies.  They were brothers.  From what I can tell, they were only drafted and didn’t serve.  Their parents were Heinrich Leies and Barbara Buchheit from Nuenschweiler and all of them had been living in Wooster, Ohio.  Heinrich was the oldest brother of Johann’s father making them aunt and uncle to Johann.

Not only is it apparent at this point in my research that the Heinrich Leies family paved the way for the other Leieses to come to America, but they got here even earlier than our first direct American ancestor Johann Schuttler in 1849.  Heinrich Leies, wife Barbara, and their sons arrived in New York City in 1848.

 

Heinrichship
September 1848 Passenger Manifest of the Nicolas, which sailed from Le Havre, France

 

I do siblings when I count the immigrants in my tree.  Do Heinrich and family count since he was the sibling of Johann’s father?  Definitely.

Back to Johann.  Do you think he lived with Uncle Heinrich or a cousin when he got to Wooster?  It is very likely.  Johann would only have been about 5 years old when his Uncle Heinrich and Aunt Barbara left Nuenschweiler.  Both his Uncle Heinrich and Aunt Barbara were two of his baptismal sponsors, as you can see on the parish record below.

JohannesBaptism
Johannes Leies Baptism, dated April 25, 1843, Catholic Parish in Nuenschweiler

 

Uncle John had a copy of a letter his grandfather wrote to his cousin Johann Leies (a different Johann!) in Massweiler, Germany in 1910 that he translated from German and distributed to his family before his death.  One detail from his life in Germany is written in the letter.  He stated that “When I was 18 years old I worked in Pirmasens near the church not far from Loewenbrunnen for a Jew called Wolf.  He had a bone mill at Nuenschweiler; his son’s name was Alphonse.  He went to America.”  

Important facts about Johann’s years in America were listed in the letter to back home in 1910 in this order:

“I have been in America for 43 years.  I worked as a farmer and carpenter for two years;

Then I worked 7 years in the wine and beer industry in Wooster, Ohio;

Then we moved to Chicago.  Here in Chicago I have dealt in beer and wine for 8 years;

Then for four years in other types of work;

Then for 22 years in the piano business with my son.”

At the time of the 1880 Census in Wooster, Ohio, Johann’s cousin Henry Leies was running a saloon.  I can’t help but think that Johann may have been working there at some point before he moved to Chicago in the “wine and beer industry.”

The paper trail on Johann picks up in Chicago in 1880 where he is running a saloon according to the census.  I would love to know the name of his saloon – his beer and wine business.  I couldn’t find anything on newspapers.com regarding his saloon.  By the mid 1890s, the hard-working and diligent Johann owned his own piano dealing shop – John Leies Pianos.  Later he brought his son Alexander into the piano dealing business and they became known as John Leies & Son Pianos.

 

LeiesandSonPianos
Chicago City Directory, 1896

 

Johann remarried in 1896, two years after the death of Emilia Bold.  His second wife, Carolina Sickel, was born in New Orleans. The 1910 Federal Census stated that her father was born in France, and that her mother was born in Germany.  She had been put into a home before Johann died in Chicago in 1922.  You can see his Find-a-Grave Memorial here.

Written in Latin above, in the margin next to Johann’s baptism, is his date of death in America.  Uncle John knew his grandfather often sent money home to the parish in Nuenschweiler.  The priest back home either received word of his death from a relative in Nuenschweiler, a relative in Chicago who wrote home, or from Uncle John himself when he visited.  In turn, the church books of Nuenschweiler were photographed by the Latter Day Saints.  I would like to think it was from Uncle John.

Uncle John wrote a fantastic report on this grandfather of his.  Email me if you wish to have a copy.

The Ancestry of Johann Leies (so far)

The great grandmother of Johann was Margaretha Rubly.  It is in this part of Leies line that we descend from The Anabaptist Rubeli of Aeschlen bei Oberdiessbach, Switzerland, religious refugees to the German Palatinate in 1672.  I really enjoyed researching that part of the Leies family.

One of Johann’s ancestors was named Hans Adam Schwartz, born around 1650.  According to the Contwig Reformed Church Records I found, he was a Gerichtsschoffe or Court Alderman in the Zwiebrucken area of the Palatinate.  He was our 7th great grandfather.  His daughter Anna Ottilia married our 6th great grandfather Jakob Johann Wenceslaus Layies-Trauden.  Leies was spelled as Layies at that point in the church records.

Johann also had ancestors born in France like his wife Emilia.  The earliest known of them was Jean Michel Conrad, born December 3, 1697 in Shweyen, Moselle.  I would like to point out that in 1697, parts of the Palatinate were under French rule.  His baptism from the Archives of Moselle is below.  Thank you cousin G. Pfeiffer in France for sharing and emailing many Conrad records to me.

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Like some of the ancestry of Emilia Bold, going back to the 1400s in this part of Europe, there are two parts of Johann’s ancestry that “claim” to be able to trace back to the 1400s, and even to the 1300s in a town in the present-day Saarland.  In the 1300s the region of present-day Saarland was part of the Holy Roman Empire.  Emilia’s Helfrich line isn’t a myth right now like Johann’s pre-1600s ancestors are for American researchers.  Maybe those trees on Geneanet are correct, but I can’t prove it!  

Johann’s 1910 letter stated he had a photo album of his family back in Germany.  If that album still exists, it must be a treasure.  

Sources:

Wayne County, Ohio Historical Society

Nuenschweiler, Germany Catholic Church Records

Hornbach Catholic and Protestant Church Records

Intelligenzblatt des Rheinkreises, Volume 7

Cousin G. Pfeiffer, France

Baptemes Loutzviller 1691-1723, Archives 57

Contwig, Germany Church Records 

Weisbach and Massweiler, Germany Catholic and Reformed Church Records

Zur Familie Trauden/Layes von Oberhausen, by Johannes Becherer via L. Broschart in Koblenz, Germany

United States Federal Censuses

Ohio Birth and Marriage Indexes

Uncle John

Chicago Marriage and Death Indexes

Find-a-Grave

Newspapers.com

New York Passenger Lists/Manifests/National Archives

Wikipedia

Google Books

Chicago City Directories

Numerous French and German personal genealogy databases

 

 

–cinziarosagenealogy@comcast.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Immigrant #28 ~ 2nd Great Grandfather Frederick “Fritz” Eckebrecht, Carpenter and Butcher

Uncle John researched his Thuringian, multi-faceted, immigrant grandfather Fritz Eckebrecht for decades.  Fritz was my second great grandfather and everyone in the family knows his name.  My little niece giggled when she heard his name for the first time.  From a young age we were told he was “taken” by Comanches in Texas and was made to be a butcher for them.  After he left Texas and the Comanches, he went to Chicago to work for hire “re-building Chicago after the fire with his carpentry” talents.  Later, he opened a butcher shop there, using the skills he learned while with the Comanches.  He spoke Comanche and when you read more of Uncle John’s research you wonder how much of a captive he really was.

Uncle John’s own words and research were posted here previously:

The Multi-Faceted Life Of Fred Eckebrecht 1848-1920.

The other day I was looking for Fritz’s obituary at newspapers.com and came across this intriguing little snippet from the January 6, 1888 edition of The Chicago Inter-Ocean:

 

Fritz.CookCountyCriminalTheInterOcean6.Jan.1888
This fell under the head for Cook County Criminal Court

Fritz, what went on there? 

I couldn’t help but notice this is the time period that Uncle John surmised my second great grandmother Katharina Schuttler had left him for a few years.  There was no other reference in the newspapers to this.  It looks like they were released on bond doesn’t it?  By the way, F.W. Westfall was a wealthy Chicago real estate developer.

So Cook County Clerk of the Circuit Court Archives has criminal records dating back to right after the fire of 1871.

Maybe we will be lucky and a copy of Fritz’s case still exists…

 

cinziarosagenealogy@comcast.net

Immigrant #27 ~ Great Grand Aunt Giovania Ferraro ~ What Happened to You?

My great grandfather Carmine Ferraro had 5 siblings and they all immigrated to the United States.  Unfortunately, there is very little known about his last sibling Giovania, his youngest.  At present, Giovania is only found in two records in America.  The first is in the 1905 New York State Census by name and age, and the second is in the 1932 Leavenworth prison file as a reference.  There is no oral history on this sibling either.

Giovania was not on the 1904 passenger manifest of her mother and sisters.  Since her mother and sisters were detained, the tally of detained and released passengers at the end of the roll of records from the National Archives specifically divulges 3 children over the age of 1 were released with mother Filomena Napolitano.  Giovania would have been about 14 at that time.  I plainly do not know when Giovania got here.  I cannot figure out how or with whom Giovania came to America period.

In 1905, Giovania was living in Brooklyn with her three sisters and parents, according to the New York State Census.  That record showed she was born in Italy, 15 years old, and did housework.  This is the only record I ever found that gave an idea of her name and an approximate year of birth. Ancestry indexers incorrectly transcribed her name as Guarania!  

 

GiovaniaCensus1905
Giovania is at the bottom.

 

Carmine’s Leavenworth prison file references the fact, in his social interview, that he was 1 of 6 children and only 4 were alive.  The current residence of each of his siblings was listed.  By my research, Angela Maria Ferraro Valerioti was deceased.  Giovania Ferraro had to have been the other deceased sibling.

I could not find Giovania in the New York City Municipal death index, nor anywhere in Columbus, Ohio where parents Angelo Ferraro and Filomena Napolitano had moved by 1907.   She would only have been about 17 at that point.  To give you my honest opinion, I think her first or last name was corrupted on an American record, possibly in the above census, and any further proof of her in the United States may be impossible right now until more records become available.  I hope I am wrong about the corruption of her name.  Technically her name should be Giovanna, right?

I have no idea why Giovania would not be on any passenger manifest.  She definitely didn’t come to America with her father Angelo in 1903.  Also, it just is not possible for me to find her birth record in Naples at this time since 1) I don’t know her birthday and can’t write to Naples for it without it; and 2) Births of the Commune of Naples post 1865 are not online anywhere for researchers.

Could she have gone by a different first name?  Yes, and obviously the common last name poses some search issues as well.  Giovania, what happened to you?

Giovania is the last of Carmine’s siblings whose stories were told here.  The rest can be found in these previous posts:

Immigrant #2: Angela Maria Ferraro Valerioti – Mother of a Renowned NYC Investigator and a NYC Refuse Company President

Immigrant #5 ~ The Disappearing Antonio Ferraro and More on Antonio Ferraro here

Immigrant #23 ~ Great Grand Aunt Elena Ferraro Scarnecchia

Immigrant #26 Gelsomina Ferraro Ciocco ~ Pasta Company Treasurer and Mother of Biostatistician Dr. Antonio Ciocco

 

Update on Available Italian Genealogical Records

As of 11:00 am on August 26th, 2017, any available genealogical records from Italy (save for the Heinzen’s ancestors, the Gentinetta of Bognanco, and Naples births post 1865 for Carmine’s siblings) that I need to access to research either Italian side of my tree will no longer have to be ordered on microfilm!  Any records that aren’t on Antenati San Beniculturali from Italy were made available for viewing on the Family Search website.  Some of those can only be viewed at a Latter Day Saints Center until Antenati in Italy publishes them for viewing online worldwide.  This includes Castiglione Messer Raimondo and Castelli in Teramo, Fara San Martino in Chieti, Nola and Sirico in Napoli, and San Felice a Cancello/Sei Casali d’Arienzo and San Prisco in Caserta.  Farindola and all of Pescara have been on Antenati for years and is accessible in every home.  Since Nola is now available to help identify more ancestors there, I have a feeling that part of the tree will grow to aid in finding relatives of Filomena Napolitano in America.  

Sources:

Ellis Island Passenger Manifests

NY State Census of 1905

Federal records obtained from the National Archives in Kansas

Upcoming Immigrants:

More in the Leies – Bold branch, including the Leies family that went to New York City and the Leies family that beat all of the others here by arriving in 1848.  The immigrants are about halfway complete.

This blog just turned 2!  Thank you readers!

 

Immigrant #26 Gelsomina Ferraro Ciocco ~ Pasta Company Treasurer and Mother of Biostatistician Dr. Antonio Ciocco

manifestamferraro
Gelsomina is the 3rd from the top on the Lombardia’s Manifest Snippet

Immigrant Gelsomina Ferraro Ciocco was born in 1884 in Naples and came through Ellis Island in 1904 with her mother, Filomena Napolitano, and siblings Angela Maria Ferraro Valerioti, Elena Ferraro Scarnecchia, and Carmine Ferraro, my great grandfather, when she was 19. She was the mother of well – known biostatistician Dr. Antonio Ciocco.  Like her mother and sisters, she didn’t speak English, and was detained for a simple reason.  Her father, Angelo Ferraro, was not on time to collect the women to take them to Brooklyn.  The passenger manifest was marked that she could read and write in her native tongue.  She was my great grand aunt and the only sibling of my great grandfather that we have a photo of.

GelsominaandAntonioCiocco
Gelsomina and son Antonio Ciocco in her 1921 U.S. Passport Application; yes, she looks like half of the females in the family

One year later Gelsomina was residing with her parents when they lived in Brooklyn.  By 1907, Angelo and Filomena had moved to Columbus, Ohio.  That is where Gelsomina likely met her future husband Angelo Michele (Michael) Ciocco.   They were married in early 1908 by Father Sovilla in St. John the Baptist Church.

GelsominaMarriage.PNG
Franklin County Marriage Certificate via Ancestry.

Michael (Angelo Michele) Ciocco was born at #289 Via Borga, Guardialfiera, Campobasso, Molise, Italy on May 30, 1883 to Antonio Ciocco, a pasta maker, and Rosaria D’Onofrio.  His birth record (#41) via Antenati.

Gelsomina’s son Antonio Ciocco was born May 1, 1908.  Michael was naturalized in 1916 in Franklin County, Ohio.

AngeloMicheleCiocco.PNG
Angelo Michele Ciocco’s 1921 Passport Application Photo

When Michel’s parents brought the family to America, they ran an Italian bakery in Columbus.  Michael worked there and was also able to graduate high school.

Gelsomina went by Jessie in “American.”  I was glad United States Passport Applications up to I think, 1925, are on Ancestry and we have those photos of Gelsomina, Antonio, and Michael from 1921.  It gave me a hint about where Gelsomina had lived in America up until that point.  She stated she lived in Brooklyn, Chicago, and Columbus.  Oh, and she was also apparently 5’5″!

Remember in 1908 she married Michael?  In 1910 Michael was living with his parents and working at their bakery with Gelsomina and son Antonio nowhere in sight.  So I wondered if she was living in Chicago because Michael’s passport application stated that he had only lived in Columbus since he came to America.  Could she have been living near my great grandfather, her brother, in Chicago?  Or near Angela Maria Ferraro Valerioti  her sister in Chicago?

Maybe Gelsomina was living with her parents in Columbus. Unfortunately, I couldn’t find them on the 1910 Census.  In 1912 she traveled to Naples with her parents and visited 22 Montesanto Naples.  There is a monastery on Montesanto today, although not at the same address.  When her mother Filomena passed away in Columbus in 1914, Gelsomina was the informant on her death record.

In 1920, Gelsomina was living with her husband according to the Federal Census.  She was the bookkeeper for his pasta business – Columbus Macaroni Company.

Gelsomina returned to Naples two more times in the 1920s.  The 1925 return passenger manifest showed Gelsomina and Michael lived at 101 Thompson Street in New York City.

In 1927 and 1928 I found Gelsomina and Michael in the Newark, NJ City Directory.  Gelsomina was the Treasurer of their company Ciocco Macaroni Company, Inc.

JessieTreasurer.PNG

Like Gelsomina’s sister Angela Maria’s husband Jerry Valerioti, Michael Ciocco appears on the letterhead of my great grandfather’s opera school, the International Grand Opera Association in Chicago.  Michael Ciocco was listed as “press agent.”

Michael Ciocco’s parents continued to have their Italian bakery business in Columbus while continuing to speak their native tongue, according to the census records I found on them, and nobody suffered for it.  Michael’s father passed in 1932 and his mother passed in 1936.

Dr. Antonio Ciocco – Gelsomina Ferraro’s Son

Gelsomina only had one child – Dr. Antonio Ciocco and he was extremely important to health research in Pennsylvania, if not to the nation.  To discover where Gelsomina and Michael went after retirement from pasta manufacturing, I had to search for information on my 1st cousin two times removed Dr. Antonio Ciocco.  By 1935, Gelsomina and Michael had moved to Baltimore Maryland, where they lived with their son Antonio who was employed by the Federal Government at the United States Department of Health as a statistician.

I found a newspaper article on newspapers.com stating that Antonio was the chief of the Hagerstown, Maryland Field Station of the U.S. Public Health Service.  They likely moved to Pittsburgh with Antonio, because, in 1957, Michael Ciocco passed away in Pittsburgh, and in 1958, Gelsomina Ferraro passed away outside of Pittsburgh in New Brighton, Beaver County.  Antonio was the informant on both death records and signed his name as Dr.

Gelsomina was laid to rest at St. Joseph’s cemetery in Columbus, Ohio, with her husband.

Dr. Antonio Ciocco held science degrees from the University of Naples and Johns Hopkins.  The latter was likely the reason for his previous Baltimore address.

Articles referencing Antonio’s work in Pittsburgh starting around 1950 fill newspapers.com.  He conducted many studies, including some on cancer statistics, and is most well-known for his study on the effects of pollution in Donora, Pennsylvania that was published in coordination with another researcher in 1948.  The deadly and historic wall of polluted fog is also called the Donora Smog. In four days in October 1948, it killed 20 people and is believed to be the cause of death for at least 5 others.

You can see some of Dr. Ciocco’s published works here on World Cat.

Other information is best summed up about him in his Pittsburgh Post-Gazette obituary dated January 6, 1972.  I am posting it below in chunks.

obit1obit2obit3

 

His mass of Christian burial was held at St. Paul’s Cathedral, Pittsburgh.  I found his Find-a-Grave memorial created by another user.  He is buried in Silver Spring, Maryland.

I tried finding information about Michael and Gelsomina’s pasta companies but I didn’t turn up anything.  The Campobasso ancestry of Angelo Michele Ciocco and his parents can very easily be traced on Antenati.

Who do you think Great Grand Aunt Gelsomina resembles the most?

My immigrant great grandfather has one more sister – Giovannina Ferraro.

Sources:

Ellis Island Passenger Ship Manifests

Antenati

U.S. Passport Applications via Ancestry

United States Federal Censuses

New York State Census, 1905

Columbus and Newark City Directories

Franklin County, Ohio Marriage Records

Franklin County, Ohio Birth Index

Pennsylvania Death Certificates via Ancestry

Cousin Cleonice, C. Ferraro’s Federal file

Wikipedia

Newspapers.com Subscription

United States Social Security Death Index

Find-a-Grave.com

My email: cinziarosagenealogy@comcast.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If Vito Barbarino and Angela Nicolino Are In Your Tree Twice It Means…Uh Oh

Talanico, San Felice a Cancello, Caserta, Campania – When Vito Barbarino and Angela Nicolino are appearing in your pedigree twice as your forebears, you know two people in your Ferraro ancestry must’ve been related.  It turns out that great great grandfather Immigrant #3 ~ Retired Army Captain and Merchant Angelo Ferraro‘s parents were related because Vito Barbarino and Angela Nicolino from Roccarainola are in his ancestry on both sides of his family.  They were his great great grandparents twice through their daughter Giulia Barbarino – the ancestress of Angelo’s mother Angela Maria Delle Cave and Giovanna Barbarino – the ancestress of Angelo’s father Francesco Antonio Ferraro.

Giulia and Giovanna Barbarino were sisters, both daughters of Vito Barbarino and Angela Nicolino.

 

GiuliaBarbarinop.33.1259SPA.1696Bapt
Baptism of Giulia Barbarino, 1696, San Pietro Apostolo, Talanico, San Felice a Cancello

 

This all makes the parents of Angelo Ferraro third cousins.

Vito Barbarino and Angela Nicolino began to appear in the Talanico, San Felice a Cancello’s San Pietro Apostolo’s church records around 1690, with the notation that they were from a parish of Roccarainola, which is about 5 miles from the ancestral town of Angelo’s parents, San Felice a Cancello.

What can be gleaned from the online church records from the Diocese of Acerra concerning the Barbarinos is that their son Giacomo Antonio was at one point contributing the largest amount of tomolo of grain in tithes to the parish of San Leonardo in San Felice a Cancello.  Tomolo is an old Southern Italian measurement.

You can see the from pedigree of both parents of Angelo that, yep Barbarino and Nicolino are indeed in each one.

AMDelleCavePedigreeFAFerraropedigree

Giulia Barbarino married Lorenzo Delle Cave in 1721.  Giovanna Barbarino married Leonardo De Lardo in 1716.  Descendants of both sisters married approximately 100 years later and had Angelo Ferraro.

So.  They were related.  At least they weren’t 1st cousins HA!

Sources:

San Pietro Apostolo, Diocese of Acerra

San Leonardo, Diocese of Acerra

San Felice a Cancello, Civil Records

cinziarosagenealogy@comcast.net

Back to the immigrants.  #26.

Today’s Anniversary: Bartolomeo Massimo Antonio Desiati “Cacciatore” and Angela Emmanuela Sacchetti Muffitti

PennePenne, Pescara ~ On this day in 1821 my 5th great grandparents Bartolomeo Massimo Antonio Desiati “Cacciatore” from Penne, Pescara and Angela Emmanuela Sacchetti Muffitti from Castelli, Teramo, were married in Penne.  As far as records go, it was a strange marriage.  Look at all of those last names confusing the situation.  He was 59 and she was 32.

I found that someone in Penne must’ve made an error on a previous record two years prior.  When my 5th great grandparents had my 4th great grandfather Sabatino in 1819 the civil records officer wrote that Emmanuela was: sua moglie legitima=his (Bartolomeo) legitimate wife.  Hmmmm….The alias Cacciatore Bartolomeo had inherited from his father and Angela Emmanuela’s Sopranome Muffitti also added to the confusion over this set of ancestors.  I couldn’t figure out if Bartolomeo was having children with two different Emmanuelas or what!

Desiati alias Cacciatore

My 5th great grandfather Bartolomeo Massimo Antonio Desiati Cacciatore was born in Penne in 1762.  When his father died in 1775, the priest referred to him in the church death book at San Giovanni Evangelista in Penne as “Luciano Desiati alias Cacciatore.”  His death record is here in the marriage processetti of Bartolomeo and Emmanuela on Antenati.  Cacciatore = Huntsman.  Either Luciano Desiati, or one of his ancestors, slay beasts with skill for food, or was given the alias for another reason we will probably never know.

Similarly, in 1831, after Bartolomeo had four more children with Emmanuela and died, the civil records officer wrote his name as “Bartolomeo Desiati Cacciatore” on his death record.   Morti #43 via Antenati.  Bartolomeo’s half-brother Berardino was also recorded on his death record as “Berardino Desiati Cacciatore.”

Sacchetti Sopranome Muffitti

The civil records in Penne told me that an Emmanuela Muffitti had a son with Bartolomeo Cacciatore in February 1821 shortly before he married a lady with another surname – my 5th great grandmother.  On July 18th of that year, Angela Emmanuela Sacchetti, born in Villa Bifiore, Castelli, Teramo in 1789, daughter of the deceased Altobrando Sacchetti and Domenica Petra Menei, married Bartolomeo Massimo Antonio Cacciatore civilly at town hall and in church at San Giovanni Evangelista in Penne!   I didn’t know if these Emmanuelas were the same yet.

The 1821 marriage record from Penne via Antenati.

I discovered after looking through more Penne records that Sacchetti and Muffitti weren’t common surnames in the town at all.   Following the finding of the rest of Bartolomeo’s and Emmanuela’s children, including the birth of the Bartolomeo’s last child when he was 64, and seeing Emmanuela’s surname switching back and forth between Muffitti and Sacchetti, I just figured Bartolomeo was ignorant of the fact that the civil records officer kept writing different things and she was likely the same woman.

Then, when I found my 4th great grandfather’s Sabatino’s marriage record to Antonia Oriani/Auriano, (daughter of Massimo Antonio Nicola Oriani/Auriano and Rosalinda Maddalena Mincarelli) in 1844, there was a notation regarding Emmanuela’s surname, since she was deceased.

Sabatino’s marriage to Antonia Oriani. #44 Matrimoni 1844 Penne. Please see page 2.

The marriage record stated on the second page that Muffitti wasn’t incorrect on previous records regarding Bartolomeo and Emmanuela, because “her surname was Sacchetti and Muffitti was the SOPRANOME.”  Apparently a Sopranome distinguishes between family branches in larger towns or can be a nickname.  I can find no perfect genealogical definition for a Sopranome.

One time I saw a Penne record say that Massei was a Sopranome.  Are my ancestors named Massei really using a Sopranome?  No clue and I can’t tell from the records available to me…  So for now this is the best I can do for a sopranome definition:

Sopranomemeaning
Thanks Google

 

Their Orphaned Children

Bartolomeo and Emmanuela died 10 months apart in 1831 and left their 5 children as orphans.  Sabatino was only 12.  Emmanuela was recorded as “Emmanuela Muffitti” on her death record.  I have been trying to track their children.  It is definitely a possibility they went to live with Desiati relatives in Penne.

I know for sure that Sabatino, my 4th great grandfather, their oldest, married my 5th great grandmother Antonia Oriani in Penne.  After she left him a widow in 1857, Sabatino moved his children to Farindola, and married a cousin of ours, a Sciarra.  Sabatino died in Farindola in 1899 and the records officer wrote his name as “Sabatino Cacciatore.”  His cousin Luigi died in Penne in 1912 as “Luigi Desiati Cacciatore.”

I cannot at this time establish a connection between the Desiati alias “Cacciatore” family and the Cacciatore families living in Penne at the same time as our Luciano, Bartolomeo, and Sabatino.  Maybe there is no connection at all…

I wonder how he earned the alias and what the Sopranome meant…

Pace. Alla prossima!

 

castelli
Castelli, Teramo

 

cinziarosagenealogy@comcast.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

My German Palatinate, Saarland, Lorraine, France, and Swiss Anabaptist Surname and Place Lists

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The German Palatinate

  • Nunschweiler: Leies/Lais/Layes/Leis/Leyes, Bold, Pfeiffer, Scheid (originated in Loutzviller, Moselle), Bauer, Burkhart, Conrad (originated in Schweyen, Moselle)
  • Knopp-Labach: Bold, Becker
  • Rodalben: Scheid (originated in Loutzviller, Moselle), Buchler, Becker, Wilhelm, Hauck, Bisser(in), Helfrich/Helferich/Helferig
  • Vinnigen: Hauck, Kolsch (originated in Moselle)
  • Leimen/Merzalben/Leiningen: Reber, Helfrich/Helferich/Helferig (in Leimen before and after the Thirty Years War according to 850 Jahre Leimen.  See also Die Helfriche)
  • Mauschbach: Conrad, Steu/yer, Pfeiffer, Kempf, Burkhart, Ziegler
  • Grosssteinhausen: Pfeiffer, Kempf, Schaefer, Engel
  • Leichelbingen (Monbijou): Ziehl
  • Hornbach: Ziehl
  • Beidershausen: Stuppi/y, Muller, Rubli
  • Niedershausen: Stuppi
  • Oberhausen: Rubly/Rubli, Schwartz, Leyies/Leies/Layes/Leyies-Trauden/Traudi
  • Bechhofen: Rubli
  • Zweibrucken: Schwartz
  • Weisbach: Leies
  • Contwig: Leyies/Leies/Leyies-Trauden/Leyies-Traudi/Traudi, Rubeli
  • Messerschwanderhof: Rubeli

I share DNA with the descendants of the Hauck family and Helfrich family that emigrated to Pennsylvania before the Revolution. 

Anyone in America that has the surname Leies in their tree and has ancestors that immigrated to NYC and Wooster, Ohio is my DNA cousin.  They can all be traced back to Wenceslaus Layes-Trauden who lived the Zweibrucken area in the 1690s.  His origin is unknown. 

Please see this former post on the ancestry of Emilia Bold from Nunschweiler who descends from the Hauck, the Helfrich, and several Moselle and Pfalz millers: Immigrant #24 ~~ Great Great Grandmother Emilia Anna Bold Leies~~

 

Saarland*

  • Saarbrucken: Kempf, Ludt, Hufflinger
  • Burbach: Gans, Hufflinger

*My Kempf ancestors from Grosssteinhausen, RP are possibly descended from the Saarbrucken Kempfs in the Saarland.  I am working to prove descendancy from the Bailiff Hufflinger who lived in Saarbrucken in the 1400s which French researchers on Geneanet seem to think is a possibility.

 

Moselle, Lorraine, France

  • Loutzviller: Bittel, Scheid(t), Conrad
  • Schweyen: Conrad, Stauder
  • Volmunster: Bittel, Ziegler, Stauder, Stauder dit Le Suisse
  • Haspelscheidt: Fabing/Faber
  • Sarreguemines: Bittel
  • Roppeviller: Schaub dit Bittel
  • Bliesbruck: Stauder dit Le Suisse
  • Leiderschiedt: Weyland
  • Urbach: Faber, Champion (origin possibly Picardie, France)
  • Petit-Rederching: Faber, Faber dit Schoff Jockel
  • Bitche: Faber

I have DNA matches with the Conrad family that emigrated to Germantown, Pennsylvania. I share DNA matches with the Stauders the emigrated to Ohio from the Palatinate. 

 

Bernese Anabaptist Refugees to the Palatinate

  • Aeschlen bei Oberdiessbach, Bern: Rubeli, Muller migrated to Fischbach, RP and lived in Messerschwanderhof and Contwig.  The Rubeli were related to the Gungerich Anabaptists of Diessbach.  See: Mennosearch.com. 

My DNA matches the Rubeli descendants that emigrated to Pennsylvania before the Revolution.  They used Ruble and Ruple in America.  See also this former blog post for sources and references on the Rubeli: Immigrants #11 to 20 ~ The Anabaptist Rubeli of Aeschlen bei Oberdiessbach, Switzerland.

 

Links to my Palatinate Immigrants and Refugees on Ancestry.com

Christian Rubeli – Mennonite Refugee to the Palatinate

Anna Muller – Mennonite Refugee to the Palatinate

Emilia Bold Leies

Elisabetha Scheid Bold

Johannes Leies

Peter Leies – Palatinate Immigrant that died at Antietam

 

cinziarosagenealogy@comcast.net 

Shoot me an email if you want to compare DNA. Have a Wonderful Fourth!