My German Palatinate, Saarland, Lorraine, France, and Swiss Anabaptist Surname and Place Lists

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The German Palatinate

  • Nunschweiler: Leies/Lais/Layes/Leis/Leyes, Bold, Pfeiffer, Scheid (originated in Loutzviller, Moselle), Bauer, Burkhart, Conrad (originated in Schweyen, Moselle)
  • Knopp-Labach: Bold, Becker
  • Rodalben: Scheid (originated in Loutzviller, Moselle), Buchler, Becker, Wilhelm, Hauck, Bisser(in), Helfrich/Helferich/Helferig
  • Vinnigen: Hauck, Kolsch (originated in Moselle)
  • Leimen/Merzalben/Leiningen: Reber, Helfrich/Helferich/Helferig (in Leimen before and after the Thirty Years War according to 850 Jahre Leimen.  See also Die Helfriche)
  • Mauschbach: Conrad, Steu/yer, Pfeiffer, Kempf, Burkhart, Ziegler
  • Grosssteinhausen: Pfeiffer, Kempf, Schaefer, Engel
  • Leichelbingen (Monbijou): Ziehl
  • Hornbach: Ziehl
  • Beidershausen: Stuppi/y, Muller, Rubli
  • Niedershausen: Stuppi
  • Oberhausen: Rubly/Rubli, Schwartz, Leyies/Leies/Layes/Leyies-Trauden/Traudi
  • Bechhofen: Rubli
  • Zweibrucken: Schwartz
  • Weisbach: Leies
  • Contwig: Leyies/Leies/Leyies-Trauden/Leyies-Traudi/Traudi, Rubeli
  • Messerschwanderhof: Rubeli

I share DNA with the descendants of the Hauck family and Helfrich family that emigrated to Pennsylvania before the Revolution. 

Anyone in America that has the surname Leies in their tree and has ancestors that immigrated to NYC and Wooster, Ohio is my DNA cousin.  They can all be traced back to Wenceslaus Layes-Trauden who lived the Zweibrucken area in the 1690s.  His origin is unknown. 

Please see this former post on the ancestry of Emilia Bold from Nunschweiler who descends from the Hauck, the Helfrich, and several Moselle and Pfalz millers: Immigrant #24 ~~ Great Great Grandmother Emilia Anna Bold Leies~~

 

Saarland*

  • Saarbrucken: Kempf, Ludt, Hufflinger
  • Burbach: Gans, Hufflinger

*My Kempf ancestors from Grosssteinhausen, RP are possibly descended from the Saarbrucken Kempfs in the Saarland.  I am working to prove descendancy from the Bailiff Hufflinger who lived in Saarbrucken in the 1400s which French researchers on Geneanet seem to think is a possibility.

 

Moselle, Lorraine, France

  • Loutzviller: Bittel, Scheid(t), Conrad
  • Schweyen: Conrad, Stauder
  • Volmunster: Bittel, Ziegler, Stauder, Stauder dit Le Suisse
  • Haspelscheidt: Fabing/Faber
  • Sarreguemines: Bittel
  • Roppeviller: Schaub dit Bittel
  • Bliesbruck: Stauder dit Le Suisse
  • Leiderschiedt: Weyland
  • Urbach: Faber, Champion (origin possibly Picardie, France)
  • Petit-Rederching: Faber, Faber dit Schoff Jockel
  • Bitche: Faber

I have DNA matches with the Conrad family that emigrated to Germantown, Pennsylvania. I share DNA matches with the Stauders the emigrated to Ohio from the Palatinate. 

 

Bernese Anabaptist Refugees to the Palatinate

  • Aeschlen bei Oberdiessbach, Bern: Rubeli, Muller migrated to Fischbach, RP and lived in Messerschwanderhof and Contwig.  The Rubeli were related to the Gungerich Anabaptists of Diessbach.  See: Mennosearch.com. 

My DNA matches the Rubeli descendants that emigrated to Pennsylvania before the Revolution.  They used Ruble and Ruple in America.  See also this former blog post for sources and references on the Rubeli: Immigrants #11 to 20 ~ The Anabaptist Rubeli of Aeschlen bei Oberdiessbach, Switzerland.

 

Links to my Palatinate Immigrants and Refugees on Ancestry.com

Christian Rubeli – Mennonite Refugee to the Palatinate

Anna Muller – Mennonite Refugee to the Palatinate

Emilia Bold Leies

Elisabetha Scheid Bold

Johannes Leies

Peter Leies – Palatinate Immigrant that died at Antietam

 

cinziarosagenealogy@comcast.net 

Shoot me an email if you want to compare DNA. Have a Wonderful Fourth!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Immigrant #24 ~~ Great Great Grandmother Emilia Anna Bold Leies~~

Immigrant Emilia Anna Bold was born in 1843 in Nuenschweiler, Rheinpfalz, Germany like her future husband Johann Leies.  She was the daughter of Nuenschweiler’s Catholic Schoolmaster Franz Jacob Bold and Elisabetha Scheid.  She was my second great grandmother.

EmiliaBold
Emilia’s baptism from the Catholic Kirchenbuch of Nuenschweiler.  Her godmother is her aunt Gertrud Scheid.  Father Peter Bold baptized her.  He was from Rodalben.  He baptized her mother in Rodalben in 1822 as well.

Emilia was 1 of 5 Bold children that survived to adulthood.  Her brothers Alexander, Richard, and sisters Juliana Rosa and Anna came to the United States sometime around 1866.  The Catholic Kirchenbuch of Nuenschweiler lists Emilia and her brother Alexander as being confirmed in 1865.  Their confirmation sponsor was Emilia’s future husband Johann Leies.  In that record the parish priest spelled his surname “Lays.”  Emilia’s brothers were both Chicago police officers.  We know that Immigrant #1: Chicago Police Officer Alexander Bold was naturalized in 1866 which leads me to believe that is about the same time Emilia arrived.  In those days you didn’t have to be in the country for at least 5 years before you could be naturalize.  Nobody has ever been able to find the immigration records of the Bolds coming to the United States.  Of course it is possible that Emilia came to America with Johann Leies.  However, there is no evidence they were married yet.  Their marriage was not in the Nuenschweiler Kirchenbuch.  I am making a guess they were married in Ohio.

Emilia married Johann Leies.  Their sons Alexander (my great grandfather) and John Ferdinand were born in 1870 and 1872, in Wooster, Ohio.

In 1876, Emilia and Johann moved to Chicago.  I regret that so little else is known about my second great grandmother.  Emilia died at age 51 in 1894 and is buried in Saint Boniface Cemetery in the Leies plot. Emilie Bold Leies (1843 – 1894) – Find A Grave Memorial.

Emilia’s second son, my great grandfather’s brother, John Ferdinand, was ordained a Redemptorist Priest in 1896 in New Orleans and died of a sudden illness shortly thereafter.  Uncle John wrote about his uncle John Ferdinand, and in the near future, it will be shared here, like the life of  The Multi-Faceted Life Of Fred Eckebrecht 1848-1920.

I only have two records plus a newspaper clipping in America that mention Emilia specifically.  She appears on the 1880 census in Chicago as wife of Johann Leies keeping house when he is running a tavern in Chicago.  The second record is her Cook County, Illinois death index record!  The news clipping is about a civil suit appeal in which she is mentioned in the Civil Suit roll as a plaintiff in 1877, the outcome of which I haven’t yet been able to find.  I think she was close to her brother Alexander, having named my great grandfather after him.  Maybe both of her brothers frequented her husband’s saloon.

Two years after her passing, Emilia’s widower married Caroline Sickel, a native of New Orleans.  She was the daughter of a French immigrant father and German immigrant mother with the surname of Kunz who Uncle John was certain was also a native of Nuenschweiler.  She and Johann had no children.

Back in Germany: Franz Jacob Bold

It is known that Emilia’s father Franz Jacob Bold stayed behind in Germany because in 1874 he appeared in this book in 1874 and listed as the schoolmaster of the Catholic school in Nuenschweiler:

FranzBook

bold
Snippet out of the blatt

Franz Jacob also signed Catholic Church records in Nuenschweiler as the head school master.  See Another Week, Another Country. Discoveries in Germany in the Leies Line. The Bolds have been hard to research beyond the parents of Franz Jacob Bold – Johann Adam Bold and Margaretha Becker.  He was born in nearby Labach in 1811, and was 1 of 8 children. They were 7 boys and 1 girl in all.  Emilia’s Bold grandfather was a farmer.  Source: Familienbuch, Knopp-Labach 1785-1799-1824.  They moved the family to Rodalben, a neighboring town to Nuenschweiler.  Source: Rodalben Kirchenbuch. Because Emilia’s father was the schoolmaster, I want to find out more about the Bolds to see if there are more teachers in her father’s ancestry.

“I can’t help but think the genes of Emilia’s father maybe the cause for so many schoolteachers in Emilia’s descendants.”

Elisabetha Scheid

Like Emilia, little is known about the life of her mother Elisabetha Scheid.  Could she have come to the United States with her children?  It is possible.  I found a widowed Elizabeth Bold in the 1900 New York City census living with a niece and nephew born in Germany in September 1822.  That jives with our Elisabetha.  But I can’t connect the niece and nephew to our Elisabetha.

Unfortunately, as is common in researching female ancestors, I know more about Elisabetha’s ancestry than I do her or her daughter Emilia Bold.  Elisabetha married Franz Jacob Bold in Nuenschweiler in 1842.  She was born in Rodalben in 1822.  Please refer to the map below.  Fr. Peter Bold baptized her.  Elisabetha was the youngest of the 10 children born to Catharina Buchler and Johann Jakob Scheid.  Once I had the names of her parents and birthplace, the ancestors just kept coming and are still increasing.  According to 850 Jahre Leimen Pfalzerwald** and Die Helfriche* a branch of Elisabetha’s ancestry was living in this southwestern area of the Palatinate before and after the Thirty Years War, which I understand was rare for that time period.  Sources: Nuenschweiler Kirchenbuch, Rodalben Kirchenbuch, Familien-und Seelen-Vercheisnissi fur Pfarrei Rodalben, 850 Jahre Leimen Pfalzerwald, Die Helfriche.

Elisabetha’s great grandfather Frederic Scheidt was born in Loutzviller, Moselle, France in 1691.

frederic scheidt baptism
Frederic Scheidt had a “t” at the end of his name on his baptism.  I was lucky.  His baptism was on the first page of records at Archives 57.

Source: Baptemes Loutzviller, Archives Moselle/Archives 57, Rodalben Kirchenbuch, Register zu Gerichtsbuch Amtes Grafenstein .  The surname is seen with a “t” at the end in Moselle, France.

Elisabethatree.PNG
Portion of Elisabetha’s pedigree

I like to refer to Elisabetha Scheid as one of the “mill ladies” in my German ancestry because she is one of the ladies that descends from a lot of millers.  Two of her great grandfathers, Frederic Scheidt and Christian Becker were millers near Rodalben in Germany.  There is evidence from the land purchases and sales in the Register zu Gerichtsbuch des Amtes Grafenstein 1657-1732, that Frederic Scheidt owned several mills in the Rodalben area to include Trulben.  Frederic Scheidt’s migration story is coming. 

Two of Elisabetha’s great great grandfathers, Johann Jacob (Georg) Hauck and Jean Nicolas Scheidt owned mills.  Johann Jacob (Georg) Hauck owned a mill in Vinningen near Rodalben while Jean Nicolas Scheidt owned the Moulin d’Eschviller in Volmunster, Moselle which had previously been owned by his father-in-law Nicolas Bittel/Buttel.  This was likely the town’s mill.  The current day Moulin d’Eschvhiller is not the mill that was standing in the 1600s.  Nicolas Bittel’s father Gall Bittel was a miller in Haspelschiedt, Moselle.  Right there, Elisabetha Scheid has at least 6 ancestors owning or operating mills in the Palatinate and Moselle.  Sources:  Register zu Gerichtsbuh des Amtes Grafenstein, Rodalben Kirchenbuch, 850 Jahre Leimen Pfalzerwald, Die Helfriche, Archives Moselle/Archives 57, Heredis Online, Wikipedia. 

 

Rodalben Area.PNG
Map of the southwest corner of the German Palatinate bordering Moselle, Lorraine.  Some areas mentioned are underlined in red.  The arrow at the top points to the direction of Leiningen, Germany and the arrow at the bottom points to the direction of Bitche, Moselle.

 

Before I write about the unconfirmed part of Elisabetha’s Moselle ancestry from the French Genealogy website Geneanet.org, I have to account for two small things regarding Elisabetha’s ancestry which are also confirmed through credible sources.  Her great great great grandfather Jean Jacques Hauck was Game Keeper (Garde Forestier) and Court Alderman (Eschevin de Justice).  Source: Heredis Online.  His son, the miller Johann Jacob Georg, married Anna Katharina Helfrich.  Do you remember that surname from the Schultheiss post?  Anna Katharina Helfrich was the daughter of Schultheiss Johann Valentin Helfrich.  Now if I am counting correctly, Anna Katharina Helfrich was also the 6th great granddaughter of Junker Helfrich of Leiningen, who was alive in the early 1400s.  Emilia Bold would then be the 11th great grand daughter of Junker Helfrich.  Sources: Die Helfriche, 850 Jahre Leimen Pfalzerwald, Rodalben Kirchenbuch.  A Junker is a usually a minor nobleman or an honorific title, or a country squire.  Source: Wikipedia.

 

LeiningenSchloss
Leiningen Schloss

 

Unconfirmed Scheidt Possibilities:

Every time I turn around there are more French genealogy sites giving me more avenues on these ancestors.  The major French genealogy site is called Geneanet.org.  There are spectacular trees from Moselle on there.  And the sources!   Wow!   Their sourced tree are incredible!  Many trees on Geneanet detail parts of the French ancestry of Elisabetha Scheid, that me as an American, without access to more records can neither prove or deny  without having someone visit the archives for me.  One tree makes a claim that Frederic Scheidt’s great grandfather Alexandre Zeigler was a miller in Volmunster.  This data is confirmed at Heredis Online but is not confirmable elsewhere.  If that turns out to be true, that would make seven millers in Elisabetha’s ancestry.

Frederictree.PNG
Frederic’s pedigree.  If correct, Francois Jacques and Ottilia would be my 10th great grandparents

 

Gall Bittel, mentioned above, if the trees can be believed, is purported to have been born in Sarreguemines, Moselle and his father Nicolas Shaub “dit Bittel” is alleged to have migrated from Switzerland or Tyrol.  The sources in these trees site notarial records of Comte de Bitche that were not destroyed during the Thirty Years War.  Another tree makes the claim that Frederic Scheidt’s great grandfather Francois Jacques Fabing/Faber was born in Switzerland, while another one ties the surname to the Fabers that lived in Bitche, Moselle.  If the latter is to be believed, and Emilia Bold’s ancestor Susanna Fabing’s father is actually a Faber from Bitche, and not Switzerland, then Emilia Bold and Johann Leies would be distantly related to each other because the Bitche Fabers are in the ancestry of my second great grandfather Johann Leies as well.  The French have access to older records and genealogy books at their genealogy societies that I can only dream of accessing here.  I am still skeptical about these Fabers/Fabings and Nicolas Shaub claims .

I wish I knew half as much about Emilia that I do about her mother’s ancestry and I just wish I had a photo of her.

In addition to the sources mentioned throughout this post that can be found at Family Search online and on microflim or online at Archives Moselle/57, the following sources were used:

Uncle John’s writings

Find-a-Grave

United States Federal Censuses

Cook County Marriage and Death Indexes

Newspapers.com

*The book on the Helfrich’s full title is: Die Helfriche im Grafensteiner Amt by Alfons Helfrich.  It is not available online.

**The link to 850 Jahre Leimen is here: click me

Coming:  The next immigrant is Carmine Ferraro’s Mother Filomena Napolitano from Nola, Napoli, Campania.  I don’t have much more to add about Filomena’s life beyond what was in that previous post.  I have been investigating her mother’s tree for about 6 months and found a midwife ancestress that I have been studying.

cinziarosagenealogy@comcast.net

-A

Immigrants #11 to 20 ~ The Anabaptist Rubeli of Aeschlen bei Oberdiessbach, Switzerland

descendancy chart

The Rubeli family were religious refugees to Germany from Switzerland in early 1672.  They were forced to leave Canton Bern because of their belief in the Anabaptist faith.  They immigrated to the part of Germany that was called Pfalzfgrafschaft bei Rhein (the present-day Palatinate or Pfalz Region).  Christian Rubeli and his wife Anna Muller were my 8th great grandparents and they brought their 6 youngest children with them, including, my 7th great grandfather, Hans Theobald Rubeli, who was only 10 years old, to the village of Fischbach to receive aid from earlier Anabaptist migrants.

Data and Sources Concerning the Origins of the Family

A book is written about the farm the Rubeli lived on outside Otterberg in Germany called Messerschwanderhof claims Christian Rubeli was born in Langnau, Bern, Switzerland.  His father may have been Peter Rubeli and his mother may have been a Gungerich.  This is a link to the website where Christian Rubeli’s family lived on their farm after he settled down in Germany:  Messerschwanderhof.  The buildings you can see on that webpage were most likely built after his death.  Because new research continually comes out to aid those researching Mennonite ancestry, I wrote this post using the following sources:

Der Messerschwanderhof by Herman Karch, Section on the Rubeli (translated to English);

Langnau and Aeschlen bei Oberdiessbach Reformed Church Records;

Bernese Anabaptists and Their American Descendants by Delbert L. Gratz;

Palatine Mennonite Census Lists 1664-1793;

History of the Bernese Anabaptists by Ernst Muller, Minister in Langnau;

Mennosearch.com;

Emigrants, Refugees and Prisoners Vol 1-4, by Richard Warren Davis;

Contwig Reformed and Catholic Church Records;

Nunschweiler and Weisbach Catholic Church Records;

French and Swiss History; and

The Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online (Gameo.org).

The Family in Switzerland

At the suggestion of a distant cousin, I found the Rubeli family in Bernese Anabaptists and Their American Descendants, because they were listed among the names of Anabaptist families living in Aeschlen bei Oberdiessbach in the Thun area of the canton in the second half of the 17th Century.  Christian Rubeli was born in 1620. (sources: Mennosearch.com and Emigrants Refugees and Prisoners)  I could not find any church record to back up the information in Der Messerschwanderhof that Christian was born in Langnau, Bern.  He was simply not in the records available to me.  The researcher of the book checked and stated there were no Rubeli mentioned in the oldest church records of Oberdiessbach dating to 1587.  The author also stated that the Rubeli likely left Langnau for Oberdiessbach because of persecution by the sovereign and said that Christian’s father Peter bought a house from his brother-in-law Hans Gungerich in Oberdiessbach in 1630.  Gungerich, according to the data in Emigrants, Refugees and Prisoners and Mennosearch.com, was a prominent surname in the Oberdiessbach area and they were all Anabaptists.  Because of the amount of Gungerich in that area, I believe it is impossible to figure out which woman could have been Christian Rubeli’s mother.

I too searched the Aeschlen bei Oberdiessbach records to 1587 and also found no Rubeli.  I do agree with the author of Der Messerschwanderhof that they weren’t from Oberdiessbach, but the Langnau records didn’t prove Christian Rubeli was born there either. 

Der Messerschwanderhof, if I am understanding the translation to English, and perhaps something happened in the translation, Peter Rubeli, supposed father of Christian, perished in the Thirty Years War.  First of all, it could be very likely that the rich men of the canton sent a Rubeli or Rubelis as mercenaries to fight for a foreign power in the Thirty Years War.  That is what the Swiss did, and that’s how the rich men in Switzerland kept their money… So I checked the dates of the 30 Years War because I planned to write the Bernese archives about Swiss mercenary rolls to see if it was possible to get any military data regarding Peter Rubeli.  So I looked up the Thirty Years War.  I then realized that given the dates of the Thirty Years War, there was a problem with what was in Der Messerschwanderhof.   There are two things that I think aren’t accurate with that if that man was our Peter Rubeli.  1.  The Anabaptists refused the oath and were against violence, and that was a main reason for their persecution; and 2.  If Peter Rubeli, Christian’s father, did perish in the Thirty Years War, he wouldn’t be there to have the children the book claims descend from him and also probably couldn’t buy that house.

SO! there are three things we can surmise from what is in Der Messerschwanderhof:

-Christian’s father was not Peter or one of these Peters.  Gungerich is not the last name of his mother either.

-Christian’s father bought the house in 1630 and was not in the war.

-Christian’s father did perish in the war and it angered his children who then trended to follow the anti-State religion – Anabaptism.  This makes for a better story. 

The only way to know is to go to Switzerland and visit the archives in Bern.  Either way, you cannot take the translation of the book literally.

At this time, I do not have any verifiable data on the mother of Christian Rubeli besides the possiblity she was could be a Gungerich (again, if Der Messerschwanderhof is correct).  Additionally, the only information I have on Christian Rubeli’s wife is that she was named Anna Muller, the church record of St. Alban’s in Oberdiessbach states she married Christian Rubeli on December 2, 1642, and she was obviously in the baptisms of her children, including the baptism of my 7th great grandfather Hans (Theobald) Rubeli pictured below.

taufen
The baptism of our Hans Rubeli from St. Alban’s, Aeschlen bei Oberdiessbach, Canton Bern

The Rubeli – Muller Migration

In 1671-1672, persecution of the Anabaptists in Switzerland was at it worst.  In November 1671, 200 persons had come to the Palatinate from Switzerland, including cripples, and elderly people ages 70-90.  They arrived destitute, having walked, with bundles on their backs, and their children in their arms.  In January 1672, 215 Swiss came to the west of the Rhine, and 428 came to the east of the Rhine.  (sources: Gameo. link, History of the Bernese Anabaptists.

With that data, I suspect that Christian, Anna Muller and 6 of their younger children, including our 10 year old Hans Rubeli, were part of the 215 Swiss Anabaptists that arrived west of the Rhine in January 1672 – because the data in Emigrants, Refugees and Prisoners and Mennosearch.com, says Christian “was called Christen Roling when he was listed as a Swiss Anabaptist refugee in April 1672 at Fischbach, Germany.  He was age 52 and his wife Anna Muller was 50 years.  They had 8 children, 6 with them, with the oldest 20 years.”  Fischbach was west of the Rhine River.  The following are the children of Christian and Anna that came to Germany:

Barbli- 20, Anna-16, Christian-14, Hans (Theobald)-10, Nikolas-8, and Madlena-3.

Source: Emigrants, Refugees and Prisoners, Mennosearch.com.

Eventually, our Hans married a lady named Anna Liesbeth, who may also have been a refugee, they had at least 6 children somewhere near Biedershausen, Germany.  If you are a Rubeli researcher reading this, there is misinformation on this website you may be familiar with:  Rubli.  As you can see, Hans Theobald was only 10 when he got to Germany, he didn’t marry his future wife Anna Liesbeth in Switzerland, bring her to Germany and have my 6th great grandfather, Balthasar Jakob, the Gerichtsschoffe.  Hans and Anna Liesbeth were already there in Germany.

In my search, Has and Anna Liesbeth had Balthasar near Biesdershausen in 1690.  I found Hans Theobald RUBELI listed as a resident of the Contwig area of the Palatinate with his wife Anna Elisabetha on June 27, 1695 in the Catholic Parish.  They are not Catholic residents.  The nearest big town to Contwig is Zweibrucken.  In 1720 in the Reformed Church records of Contwig, Hans Theobald is listed as a “common man” and the name is spelled Rubli.  Contwig is also a couple of miles from Nunschweiler, birthplace of Johann Leies and Emilie Bold.  Hans Theobald’s children appear in the local Reformed Church records, while Balthasar appears in both the local Reformed and Catholic records.  The name changes to Rubly, Rubli, Ruble, and Rubel in the early 1700s in Germany.  Balthasar married Anna Elisabetha Stuppi, and their daughter Anna Margaretha Rubly (as it was spelled in the Nunschweiler Catholic Church records) married Johannes Leyes, making them the 3rd great grandparents to Anne Leies Ferraro.  Sources: Contwig, Weisbach, and Nunschweiler church records.

Rubly.PNG
3rd line, 1st word, spelled Rubly in Nunschweiler

The Children Left in Switzerland

Christian and Anna’s oldest son Peter Rubeli didn’t accompany them to Germany according to the Fischbach refugee list.  According to Emigrants, Refugees and Prisoners, “he was a Mennonite of Aeschlen bei Oberdiessbach when he was to be sent to Pennsylvania on April 17, 1709.  He was in jail at the orphanage at Bern with his wife Margaret Engle.  Ulrich Rubeli, their second oldest son, stayed and married Anna Russer.”  However, Der Messerschwanderhof tells that Peter’s wife Margaret spent some time in the Palatinate with him and went back to their valley in Switzerland because she missed its beauty.  He went after her and they were caught, and were sentenced to be sent to America. Der Messerschwanderhof said they made their escape back to the Palatinate but also states they escaped from being sold as galley slaves which causes some confusion for a reader.  An Anna Rubeli had been imprisoned as well and she was sent away in 1711 to Holland on a ship called the Thuner.  Source: History of the Bernese Anabaptists.  I do not know her relation to our Christian and Anna, or if she was the daughter named Anna that may have returned to her homeland as well.   There are numerous other Rubeli shipped away too, of which I can’t establish a connection to our Rubeli at this time.

What Became of Christian and wife Anna

Back in Germany, Christian and his son Nikolas moved to near Otterberg and lived on a farm where a farm had had been continually in existence since the year 1195.  (Source: Messerschwanderhof).  Der Messerschwanderhof implies that Christian, Anna, and Christian’s father Peter moved to Otterberg, Germany where they lived there as early as 1688 and another date of 1682.  Other farm sources: Otterberg and Messerschwanderhof website.  The surname is spelled on those websites as Rubel and Reubal.  I believe a father of our Christian Rubeli would have been too old and doubt that.  Der Messerschwanderhof says that Louis XIV burned the Palatinate in 1684.  That year may not accurate.   He burned parts of it more than once, in 1674, 1688, and 1689.  Messerschwanderhof was burned down, and the French killed or stole the Rubeli cattle, and it is believed the people that survived the devastation fled to a small island in the Rhine River where they lived in huts and survived on frogs and snails (Source: Der Messerschwanderhof).  Because of the French actions, October 6, 1683 saw the first wave of Mennonite settlers from the Palatinate arriving in the Philadelphia at the invitation of William Penn.  They founded a new settlement called Germantown.  Source: GAMEO.org.

Contrary to what is written in Der Messerschwanderhof, after the burning, our Christian Rubeli didn’t run off or sail to America because the farm was lost.  If you want to accurately take what is in Der Messerschwanderhof though, in 1698, with the payment of protection fees to the sovereign, their youngest son Nikolas Rubel (as they spelled it) went back to the farm and began the rebuilding of the lower part of the Messerschwanderhof.  I tend to believe this part of the book since his descendants continued to live on the farm for hundreds of years.

According to Emigrants, Refugees and Prisoners/Mennosearch.com, our Christian Rubeli was living at Messerschwanderhof in 1691.  If that is accurate, what year was the farm really burned, and what year was it really re-built? 

Given the age of our Hans Theobald, and the possible dates of the burning of Messerschwanderhof, I surmise there is a possibility that he was living there when the French rolled through.  This could explain why Hans ended up near Biedershausen in 1690 and then near Contwig in 1695, where the children he and Anna Liesbeth had after Balthasar were born.

Mennosearch.com relates that descendants of Nikolas Rubeli, Christian’s brother, emigrated to Pennsylvania, settling in York and Mifflin Counties before the Revolution.  My DNA likely matches so many PA Dutch descendants because of these various portions of my Palatinate ancestry.

Finally, my research hasn’t discovered when Christian, Anna, and their son Hans Theobald and wife Anna Liesbeth died.  According to the GAMEO.org, Otterberg Germany has its own Mennonite cemetery that they have kept through the centuries.  I wonder if Contwig has the same…

Happy Easter!!!!

cinziarosagenealogy@comcast.net

Immigrants 6 and 7 ~ Auguste Eckebrecht, domestic servant and Anna Liesbeth N.N., religious refugee

Immigrant Auguste Eckebrecht was the only sister of Fritz Eckebrecht, my great great grandfather, and two years his senior.  Anna Liesbeth was my 7th great grandmother and a religious refugee.  Her last name is not known.

Auguste was born in 1846 in Schwarzburg, Thuringia, Germany.  She came to America with her family in 1866 aboard the Jenny that had sailed from Bremen in a journey across the Atlantic that took approximately 3 months.  At the time of the 1870 Federal Census, Auguste lived as a domestic servant in the home of a grocer Adolph Kate and his young wife Emilia.

auguste-eckebrecht

By 1876 she had married Charles Wolder or Wolter and they had a child that didn’t survive to adulthood.  In the above snipping tool “snipped photo” you can see Auguste is showing you her wedding ring.  She put her hand in that position on purpose.  She was married in this photo that Eckebrecht descendants believe was taken between 1872 and 1875.  I was unable to find the name or the sex of the child she had in 1876 or to trace her husband.  He has proven difficult to find.  Auguste Eckebrecht passed away in Chicago in 1916 and was buried in Rosehill Cemetery.  She was the only sibling of Fritz Eckebrecht that did not have any children that survived to adulthood.

Anna Liesbeth N.N.

Anna Liesbeth was born in Switzerland and immigrated to the Palatinate in Germany around 1675-1685 as a religious refugee.  She and her husband Hans Theobald Rubeli were part of the Anabaptist migration to the Palatinate.  Previous Anabaptist congregations that had already settled in the Palatinate set up shelter for the refugees when they had to leave their Swiss homeland with nothing but the clothing on their backs.  Their possessions had been seized by the cantonal governments.  They were forced to leave their homeland if they refused to take the oath to the state church.   If they stayed and practiced their faith, they were hunted down by Taufer hunters, imprisoned, beheaded, burned, drowned, and in the most extreme circumstances that forced the greatest number to flee their cantons, they were sold as galley slaves to the Venetian Empire.  The former punishments just drew more followers.

cropped-persecution1.jpg

I found a church record in the Massweiler area of the Palatinate that references a surname Vetter after a person named Anna Liesbeth.  However, I am not sure they are the same woman, or why an Anabaptist refugee would be mentioned in a Catholic church record.  I suppose it is possible.  She was the mother of Balthasar Jakob Rubly, the Gerichtsschoff and 5 other children born in Germany.  She was my 7th great grandmother.  Since I do not positively know her last name, I do not even know her birth or death dates.

These two women are parts of separate lines in my German grandmother’s ancestry.  One went to Germany and another left Germany.

anna-liesbeth

EDITED TO ADD ON 3/12/17: NEW RESEARCH HAS BECOME AVAILABLE.  ANNA LIESBETH MAY HAVE BEEN A SWISS REFUGEE HOWEVER, SHE WAS NOT MARRIED TO HER HUSBAND AT THE TIME HE DEPARTED SWITZERLAND.  SOURCE: MENNOSEARCH.COM/RICHARD WARREN DAVIS.

Sources:

New York Passenger Lists

United States Federal Censuses

Cook County Birth and Death Indexes

Photo from Frank Eckebrecht

Weisbach Catholic Church Registers

Massweiler Catholic Church Registers

Contwig Catholic Church Registers

Aeschlen bei Oberdeissbach Evangelical Reformed Church Register List of Taufers (Anabaptists) living in the vicinity

Palatine Mennonite Census Lists

Bernese Anabaptists and Their American Descendants

History of the Bernese Anabaptists

Rubli-Ahnen in Dachsen ZH und Zürich,  Rubeli aus Oberdiessbach BE und Gampelen BE, sowie Rubly und Ruble in Deutschland, im Elsass und in Amerika (dort auch Ruble, Rublee, Rubley, Ruple, Ruplely, Rupley, Rublier, Rupple, Ruppley, Robblee,  Robilyrd, Roblee, Roblyer)

Emigrants, Refugees, and Prisoners: An Aid to Mennonite Family Research

~Next immigrant:  Carl Johann Eckebrecht, and his colorful descendant ~

cinziarosagenealogy@comcast.net

The Rubeli/Rubly of Switzerland and the Rheinpfalz

Aeschlen

I am looking for other descendants of Hans Theobald Rubeli born around 1660 in Aeschlen bei Oberdeissbach, Bern, Switzerland. Hans Theobald Rubeli and other members of his family emigrated to the Zweibrucken area of the Rhineland Palatinate, Germany in the late 1600s. Families that left Switzerland during this time period were usually fleeing religious persecution~~~ which I have yet to prove for Hans Theobald Rubeli’s family.

BalthasarAncestry
My Rubeli Ancestry in the American Leies Line

 

Hans Theobald Rubeli and his wife Anna had at least one son named Balthasar.  Balthasar used the name Rubly in Germany and was a Gerichtsshoeffe in or near Becchofen, Rhineland Palatinate. A Gerichtsshoeffe is a type of appointed justice of the peace.

rpfalz
The German Palatinate – Site for Religious Refugees During the 1600s

 

Members of this clan may emigrated to America before the Revolution.   I am trying to establish the connection between the American branch and Hans Theobald and his son Balthasar. Please comment or leave me a message at cinziarosagenealogy@comcast.net.

 

~~~~It makes me sad to think that Uncle John never knew he had Swiss ancestry when he studied in Switzerland as a young man. – A

Uncle John and the Places His Ancestors Were Buried

kecke.jpg

Uncle John kept graphs and maps of where his ancestors and cousins were buried.  On the world-wide website Find-A-Grave his Leies, Schuttler, Gerbing, and Eckebrecht ancestors’ graves are now accessible online.  I have been requesting to manage as many Find-A-Grave burials to update, correct, and continue what Uncle John had started.  I await transfer of management for Cesidio Marcella.  Meanwhile, I have updated Katharina Schuttler Eckebrecht’s memorial, which is in the previous post.  I have corrected the misspelling in Helen Kirsch Ferraro’s memorial but have not updated the page.  I have updated Filomena Napolitano’s memorial that can be accessed by your click here. It will take time to update and correct the lot of them.

UncleJohnYoung

Finally, I hope to receive transfer of management for the memorial of Fr. John G. Leies’s (Uncle John) memorial that you can view by clicking here.  I wonder if he knew his gravesite would be on the internet after he passed away.

-A

 

Another Week, Another Country. Discoveries in Germany in the Leies Line.

Alex Leies2

 

Southwestern Germany in the Rheinpfalz near the border with Alsace, France. A set of Grandmother Ferraro’s grandparents, Johann Leies and Emilia Bold, were both baptized in the same small village in the southwest of Germany in 1843 called Nuenschweiler.  They married in Ohio a few years after they had both been in America. Their two children Alexander Leies (our ancestor) and John Ferdinand Leies were born in Ohio. Johann and Emilia moved to Chicago sometime after the fire and lived on the same street as Emilia’s brothers while Johann opened and ran a saloon.   Later they owned a piano store.

By the way, those are not misspellings in the tree.  Johann Leies was baptized as L-E-I-E-S.  His father Johann Adam married as L-A-Y-E-S.  His father Henry appears in records as L-A-Y-S, L-A-I-S, L-E-I-S, and L-E-Y-E-S.

Back in Germany, the Leies family farmed in a hamlet known as Huberhof. Emilia’s father and mother came from the nearby town of Robalden. Emilia’s parents’ marriage record, as well as various other Catholic church records in Latin from Nuenschweiler, have revealed that Emilia’s father Jacob was a schoolteacher. In fact, he signed a marriage record for an illegitimate bride as the school headmaster of Nuenschweiler.

Jacob Bold

3 x ggf Jacob Bold’s signature and title

That makes Grandmother Ferraro’s great grandfather the school headmaster of Nuenschweiler and makes the Bolds a very interesting branch of her family.