Today’s Anniversary ~ Franz Jacob Bold and Elisabetha Scheid ~

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Nuenschweiler’s Church of the Ascension via Wikimedia Commons

Nuenschweiler – On today’s date in 1842, my third great grandparents Franz Jacob Bold and Elisabetha Scheid were married in the Catholic parish in Nuenschweiler, Rheinpfalz, Germany by Father Joannis Feibel.  They were the parents of Emilia Bold Leies.

Elisabetha and Franz Jacob were from neighboring Rodalben.  She was born there while he was born in neighboring Knopp-Labach.

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Their Catholic marriage record declared that Franz Jacob was the son of Adam Bold and Margaretha Becker, married residents of Rodalben.  It looks like the parochial vicar of Rodalben, Father Petro Bold, is mentioned in the Latin marriage record.  He was the older brother of Franz Jacob.  He also baptized Elisabetha Scheid, according to the baptismal record I found on film which is now available online at Family Search.

The marriage record also declared that Elisabetha was the daughter of Johann Jacob Scheid and the deceased Catharina Buchler, also of Rodalben.

Franz Jacob Bold, the head schoolmaster of the Catholic school in Nuenschweiler, was the son of farmers.  His Bold grandparents were named Johann Adam Bold and Magdalena Helf.  Elisabetha’s ancestry has been detailed here and here.

Franz Jacob Bold, for all intents and purposes, appears to have died in Germany around 1880, which lead to his wife’s immigration to America.  She died in New York City in 1905.

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Pictures of Nuenschweiler and Knopp-Labach can be found online here.

Sources:

Familienbuch 1785, 1799 – 1824,  Knopp-Labach, Germany

Nuenschweiler, Germany Catholic Church Records via microfilm

Rodalben, Germany Catholic Church Records via Family Search

New York City Passenger Manifests

New York City Death Index

 

 

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Immigrants #35 and #36 ~ Chicago Policeman Richard Bold and Stationary Engineer Ferdinand Bold, Two of Emilia Bold’s Brothers and Both a Part of Historical Tragedies ~

Recently I was contacted by two fourth cousins researching the immigrant Bolds.  Thank you to B.R., a descendant of Alexander Bold, who pointed out that Elisabetha Scheid Bold and Franz Jacob Bold had another child that came to America and was named Ferdinand Bold.  He and his family were part of a New York City tragedy that was absolutely horrifying to discover.  Now knowing of this immigrant brother of Emilia Bold Leies, it makes sense that she named her second son John Ferdinand.

A descendant of Anna Bold Leies and Jacob Leies, P.A., informed me that there may be at three least cases of Bolds marrying Leieses in our lines.  We plan to sort it out!  This includes a possible case of one of the daughters of Anna Bold Leies, that I had vowed to find in a previous post, marrying her first cousin – a Bold!

TA also told me that Leies, on her side of the family, is pronounced LEESS.  Not LE-AS as it is on our side and there are some Leies relations residing in Pennsylvania.  Interesting indeed! Thank you for finding me!

Emilia Bold’s Youngest Brothers

Emilia Bold’s youngest immigrant brothers Richard and Ferdinand Bold seem to have traveled to America together when Richard was 17, arriving at the port of New York on November 25, 1871, on the Donau which sailed from Bremen, Germany.  The strange thing about the passenger manifest I found listed Ferdinand as age 9.  American records point to his age as having been 13.

This confuses me and leads me to doubt whether or not a Richard Bold and Ferdinand Bold traveling together are the same Richard and Ferdinand that are the brothers of Emilia.  However, if it is in fact the correct people, it is not the first time we have seen Emilia’s siblings traveling alone without parents.  Emilia’s sister Anna came here alone at the age of 15 as noted in this previous post: Immigrants #32-#34 ~~Great Great Great Grandmother Elisabetha Scheid Bold, her daughters Rosa Bold Ertl, Anna Maria Bold Leies, and their in-laws~~Today’s post is an update to that previous post.

Ferdinand J. Bold

In 1880, at B.R.’s direction, Ferdinand Bold was found marrying Mary Knaup (daughter of Anthony Knaup and Frances Nackes), a German-American born in New York City.  According to that year’s Federal Census, he was working as a stationary engineer.  The New York Marriage Index on Family Search says he was born in 1858 in Nenschweiler.  To me, that is close enough to mean Nuenschweiler, where the majority of his siblings were born.

That year, Ferdinand and his wife resided at 218 Sullivan Street with his mother-in-law Frances Knaup, sister-in-law Teresa Knaup, and brother-in-law John Knaup.  The census sheets before and after theirs reveal it to be a neighborhood made up of immigrants from Germany and Ireland.

In November of 1880, according to the Naturalization Index, Ferdinand became a naturalized citizen of the United States.

The Bolds and the Grand Street Tenement Disaster

In 1881, according to many newspaper articles, Ferdinand, wife Mary, their baby Joseph, and his wife’s family lived at the corner of 5th Avenue and Grand Street on the top floor when the tenement suddenly caved in.  It was a three floor building and Ferdinand’s family lived on the top.  It became known as the Grand Street Tenement Disaster and was nation-wide news.  Below are samples of some news clippings about the tragedy.

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The Chicago Tribune, November 10, 1881

 

 

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The Brooklyn Daily Eagle, November 9, 1881 – Note near the bottom of the paragraph the Bolds are mentioned

 

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The Chicago Inter-Ocean, November 10, 1881 – Note the paragraph about Ferdinand Bold’s family

Ferdinand’s wife’s mother and brother were killed.  She herself was badly injured but survived.  The news clippings I found about the collapse described some pretty horrific details.  Some of them were in Chicago newspapers.  Imagine how great great grandmother Emilia Bold Leies and her other Chicago siblings must have worried when they read the news there!

Below is an image found on Google images, Amazon, Abe Books, and eBay from an engraving Harpers Weekly made and printed and is called “Grand Street Tenement House Disaster.”  Originals are for sale out there on the internet.  Ferdinand Bold may be in the image.

Grand Street Tenement Disaster It is a miracle baby Joseph survived.  The following spring, Ferdinand sued James O’Brien, the owner of the building, for $1,100.00 damages.  He was awarded $426.00.  Current inflation makes that a little less than $10,000.00.

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The New York Times, March 7, 1882

A coroner’s jury was held and found James O’Brien and the owner of the adjacent building, Julius Levy, grossly negligent in the deaths of 9 tenants of the building, however, a grand jury found no criminal negligence on their part!

Ferdinand and Mary went on to have 3 more children after Joseph: Theresa, Frederick, and Albert Joseph.  Unfortunately, Ferdinand passed away young in February, 1893.

Wife Mary evidently re-married around 1895 to a Mr. Brennan because the 1900 Federal Census names her as Mary Brennan, widowed, and having been married 5 years.  Mr. Brennan had already died.   She was raising her children and his three children as well.

Ferdinand’s Descendants

Ferdinand’s children Theresa and Joseph worked in a stationary factory and never married.

Ferdinand’s sons Frederick and Albert both married.  Three grandchildren of Ferdinand served in the military.  Frederick’s two sons, Frederick James and Joseph Aloysius joined the New York National Guard while Albert’s son Walter Albert was an Army Veteran of World War II, adding to the number of descendants of Elisabeth Scheid Bold that joined the United States Military in some fashion.  Joseph Aloysius died in an automobile accident shortly after signing up for National Guard duty.

All World War I and World War II draft records that I could find for Ferdinand’s children and their descendants describe them as tall individuals, medium build, with brown hair, brown eyes, and a light complexion.

I do not know where Ferdinand is buried.

Richard Bold

Richard Bold was born in 1854 in Busenberg, a few miles from Nuesnchweiler, Germany.  A few years after he arrived at the Port of New York in 1871, I found him in the 1878 Chicago Directory, working as a barber.  At the time of the 1880 Federal Census, he was living with his older brother Alexander and his wife and family, still working as a barber.

I found a news clipping stating that on May 31, 1882, Richard Bold was appointed to the Police Department.  His brother Alexander was also a policer officer at this time.  In 1883 he married another German immigrant, Louise Ruf, daughter of Louis Ruf and Henrietta Gerber.  Later clippings regarding Richard Bold state he was a patrolman at the Larrabee Street Station.  Grandma Ferraro lived on Larrabee.

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Chicago Inter-Ocean, June 1, 1882

The Haymarket Massacre and the Bolds

On May 3, 1886, labor demonstrators across the country rallied in support of an 8 hour work day.  A peaceful demonstration in Chicago turned deadly when Chicago police officers attacked and killed picketers at the McCormick Reaper Plant.

The following day, on May 4, 1886, the Haymarket Massacre took place in Haymarket Square.   It too started as a peaceful labor demonstration organized by a few anarchists in support of that 8 hour work day and in support of the laborers the Chicago police had killed the day before.  One of the speakers at the Haymarket Square that evening was a lay Methodist Minister from England, a known activist.

At 10:30 pm, when, according to the data at the Illinois Labor History Society, 176 Chicago Police Officers carrying Winchester repeater rifles were trying to disperse the remaining crowd of 200, an unknown individual threw a dynamite bomb at the police, killing seven of them, and four civilians, and injuring many others.  Gunfire immediately following the blast also resulted in some of the deaths and injuries.  Source:  Wikipedia.

It is unknown who fired the first shot following the bombing and some reports said in the chaos the Chicago police ended up firing on each other.  A historian believes that in less than 5 minutes, 176 Chicago police officers had gotten what they desired because Haymarket Square was emptied of everyone, except for the casualties. Sources: Wikipedia, Chicagocop.com., and Chicagology.com

The next day, Marshal Law was declared in Chicago and the front page of the entire Chicago Tribune was dedicated to “hellish event”.  Source: newspapers.com.

Eventually, in actions led by irrational fear of the foreign born (including several Germans), eight accused anarchists were illegally rounded up, tried and convicted, and hung – including the lay Methodist minister from England.  One commit suicide the evening before the handing.  Later some were pardoned.  Sources: Wikipedia, Illinois Labor History Society, and Chicagocop.com.

More about controversial Haymarket can be found here: Wikipedia article.

I suppose, with the fact that 176 Chicago police officers were there that night, Police Officer Alexander Bold (then assigned to the Des Plaines Street Station) was likely there.  See Chicagocop.com – on duty police officers of the Des Plaines Street Station were at Haymarket that evening.   Patrolman Richard Bold MAY have been there as well.

In 1887, a list was printed in the newspaper of the contributions each police officer in the city made towards the “Haymarket Monument Fund.”  Richard Bold contributed .25 to the fund as part of the Larrabee Street Station.  According to Wikipedia, that monument had been damaged in the early 1900s and later destroyed in demonstrations against the Vietnam War.  A new monument dedicated to the event now stands in front of the Chicago Police Headquarters.

In 1888, I found Richard Bold on the Chicago Voter Registration stating he had lived in Chicago for 15 years and was naturalized. Perhaps he lived in NYC for two years with his Bold relatives there.

In 1889, Richard Bold appeared in list of Chicagoans in the paper who had contributed to the fund for the Chicago’s World Fair.  He contributed $20!  He never lived to see the Fair though.

He passed away in 1890 from influenza complications.  Below is his death notice.

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January 18, 1890, The Chicago Inter-Ocean

Richard had a son named Richard, born shortly after his death.  He didn’t live to his first birthday.  I have no idea who the other child is of Richard that is mentioned in his death notice.

Richard Bold is buried in St. Boniface Cemetery, burial place of his sister Emilia Bold Leies.

This all makes me wonder when did Emilia Bold get here and who did she come with, or was she like her siblings and came alone or as a teenager without an adult?

Sources:

B.R., fourth cousin

T.A., fourth cousin

New York Passenger Manifests

Family Search Busenberg Catholic Church Records

New York City Marriage Index and Death Indexes

Social Security Death Indexes

World War I and World War II Draft Cards

United States Veteran’s Burial Cards

United States Naturalization Indexes

New York National Guard Enlistment Cards

Federal Censuses

Newspapers.com

Cook County Marriage and Death Indexes

Illinois Labor History Society

Chicagocop.com

Chicago Voter Registration, 1888

City Directories

Wikipedia

Find-a-Grave

Nueschweiler, Germany Catholic Church Confirmation Records via microfilm 

Chicagology.com

Google

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 Merry Christmas!

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