Today’s Wedding Anniversary: Biagio Di Francesco and Marianna Di Pendima

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Farindola~~June 17, 1888.  On this day in 1888 my great great grandparents Biagio Di Francesco and Marianna Di Pendima were married in Farindola, Pescara.  They were both contadini and the parents of my great grandfather Paolo Di Francesco.

Biagio was born on January 15, 1866 in Trosciano, Farindola to Luigi Di Francesco and Anna Emidia Lucerini.  His birth record starts at the bottom of this page. Both of his parents were born in Farindola.   Marianna was born on March 17, 1868 in Cupoli, Farindola to Carlo Di Pentima from Via Piana, Pianella and Nicola Antonia (di) Giansante from Rione del San Giovanni, Penne.  Marianna’s birth.

The witnesses to their marriage were Clemente de Bernardinis, 43, Secretary (Municipal), and Domenico Ammazalorzco, 48, Country Guard (Municipal).

Follow this link to their marriage document.

Follow this link to their marriage allegati.

Biagio and Marianna welcomed their first child, Filomena, a little less than 9 months later.  She died in infancy.  Using other Farindola records on Antenati, I found that they went on to have at least 5 more children, and a stillborn.  One son, named Zopito, emigrated to Canada.  A daughter named Vincenza was born in 1890 and died in Farindola in 1954.

A son named Alfonso was born in 1892 and was a soldier in the 156 Regiment during World War 1 and died on August 12, 1915 from wounds received at Monte Cappuccio at the Second Battle of the Isonzo.  His death record was on Antenati here because his parents requested information on their son from the Italian Army.  In 1917, his military death record was sent from Rome to his parents and filed in the town records which I was able to access on Antenati.

 

alfonso.PNG
from Cadutigrandeguerra.it

 

My great grandfather Paolo Di Francesco was born in 1897.  On July 15, 1915, he was called to military service in World War I and served in the 30th Artillery Regiment of the Infrantry.  He was released from service in 1919.  He and his future wife Luigia Maria Massei named a son Alfonso.

Biagio and Marianna had a son named Luigi who was born in 1899.  He died in 1923 shortly after marrying Maria Vinci.  Biagio died in 1923 as well at 29 Via Rossetti, Farindola.  His death record is here.  Marianna Di Pendima lived at least until 1928 because I have not located her death record in Farindola.

A Bit About the Parents of Marianna Di Pendima

Marianna’s mother Nicola Antonia (di) Giansante’s grandparents were Saverio Di Giansante and Domenica Andreoli.  Saverio could write, and I have his signature from his son’s wedding record in Penne.  They were contadini as well.

Saverios sig

Saverio died in Penne but was born in Carpineto della Nora, Pescara, which is a few miles south of Farindola.  Saverio’s death. Saverio and Domenica have a lot of descendants researching them and I run into more and more people wondering if that is why our DNA matches, etc.  They are only in my tree once but in my Canadian cousins’ tree twice!  As I am typing this I am asking myself why I have not yet researched Carpineto della Nora on Antenati!

Marianna’s father Carlo Di Pentima was born in Pianella and was a contadino.  Carlo’s birth is on the left. Pianella is a few miles southeast of Farindola.  In Pianella, the surname is spelled with a ‘t’ and not the ‘d’ they gave it in Farindola.  I had to keep that in mind when I was looking at indexes.   I have been researching Pianella the past week and the town seems larger than Farindola. In the late 1700s Pianella had a colony of Albanians according to the Farindola history I found on this Farindolesi’s website.  I love that website.

 

Paolo.PNG
Paolo Di Francesco, Biagio and Marianna’s son

 

The research continues…Wouldn’t it be something if I found an Albanian surname in my tree?

Sources: Antenati, Cadutigrandeguerra.it, Archivio di Stato di Teramo, Zia C.

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Today’s Birthday ~ Angela Maria di Massimo in Macchie, Farindola ~ My Second Great Grandmother

FarindolaToday’s birthday is Angela Maria di Massimo, born in 1871 at 10 a.m. in Macchie, Farindola, Pescara.  She was the mother of my great grandmother Maria Luigia Massei.

AngelaMariaDiMassimo

Angela MariadiMassimoPart2

  -Number 58-

-Angela Maria di Massimo-

The year 1871, day 7 of the month of June at hour 12, at the town hall, announced to me Massimo Ferri, Secretary of this Comune di Farindola, Penne Circuit, Province of Teramo, delegated, the Civil State Official, with the act of the Mayor dated the 20th of July last year, from the Procuratore of the King, appeared Donato di Massimo, of the living Serafino and the deceased Angela Maria Colangeli (Angela Maria Cecilia Colangeli), of 26 years, occupation contadino, living as a resident in Farindola, who presents a baby of the feminine gender, that he says was born on the 7th of the current month at the 10th hour to his wife Anna Domenica Cacciatore, daughter of the living Sabatino and the deceased Antonia Uriani (Oriani/Auriano), of 25 years, with whom he resides in their house in this Comune di Farindola at contrada Macchie, to this daughter he says he has given the name Angela Maria.

The above was declared and was also presented to me by Vincenzo Colangeli of the living Mattia of 37 years of the profession contadino and living as a resident in Farindola and of Costantino Massei (my third great grandfather and future father-in-law of Angela Maria di Massimo), of the living Sabatino of 39 years of the profession of contadino also living as a resident in Farindola.

The rest of the document says something to the effect of “the above act is presented and read to all of those present because they are illiterate.”

Signed: Civil State Officer Delegate

Massimo Ferri

Source: Antenati/Archivio di Stato di Pescara: Stato Civile Italiano, Farindola, Nati 1871 Numero 58

We know from other documents retrievable at Antenati that Angela Maria’s mother Anna Domenica Cacciatore was born in Penne.  Her father Donato di Massimo was born at a place in Farindola area called the Colle della Castagna.  I would love to figure out where that spot is on a map of Farindola.  Donato’s mother Angela Maria Cecilia Colangeli, for whom my second great grandmother was named, was born in Montebello di Bertona, a neighboring village.

Another map of Farindola

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Immigrant #10 ~ Cesidio Marcella, Construction Worker

Immigrant Cesidio Marcella, my great grandfather, was born in 1895 in Case Bruciate, Farindola, Pescara, Italy.  He came through Ellis Island in 1923 when he was 28 to earn money to send home to his family.

cropped-farindola.jpg

He was 1 of 15 children.   His aunt, Maria Marcella, was the midwife that was present at his birth.  He was the oldest child of his mother, Elisabetta Rossi.  She was the second wife of his father, Filippo.  Filippo had 9 children with his first wife, Maria Antonia Lacchetta, of which, the following, that I know of, survived to adulthood:  Raffaele (father of Gabriele Marcella), Pasqua, Filomena, and Serafina.  All of Filippo’s children to Elisabetta survived to adulthood.  In order of birth, they were: Cesidio, Maria Domenica, Antonia Vincenza, and Andrea Antonio.  Andrea greatly resembled his brother Cesidio.

At age 20, my great grandfather was made to perform military service during World War I in the 3rd Regiment Artillery.

 

CesidioMatricolare
Portion of his Military Draft Record

 

The above photo is the physical description written down by the commander when he reported for his mandatory military service.  His hair was straight and chestnut colored, his eyes were chestnut (we knew them as hazel) and his nose is described as greco for Greek.  His hair would redden in the sun.  At leggere/scrivere it says “si”, so he knew how to read and write.  His profession is contadino.

I would like someone again to tell me the name of the place in the North of Italy where he had boot camp.  After having served on the front line in the trenches in Austria, he was admitted to the military hospital in June 1916.  In October 1916, he was released to go home on permanent leave.  While he was away in the Army, his father had passed away in April of 1916..  I have the rest of his military record but some of the dates are so light I can’t make other things out.  Is anyone willing to try?

A few weeks ago, I found the marriage record of my great grandparents at the LDS.  Because of Italian privacy and contractual laws, this record is not available online for all to view, because it happened in 1919.  At that time, my great grandfather was still a farmer.  I will explore their marriage record later, on their anniversary.  But for the purposes of this post, a written paragraph at the bottom stated the marriage legitimized the birth of a child born to a natural union, she was named Maria Battistisimi, and was born in 1916.  Yes, it said 1916.  Maria, according to the marriage record, was born October 29, 1916.  When I first saw her birth date on my great grandfather’s petition for naturalization in the United States, I thought he misremembered the actual date.  I will post the paragraph later and you can decide if I did indeed read her birthdate correctly.  So how could she have been conceived while my great grandfather was in the trenches in Austria?  He must’ve been on leave, right????  I COULD EASILY get her birth record from Farindola…you tell me what you think after you read about the marriage on their anniversary.

My great grandparents had four children: Zia Maria, Zia L. (who is still alive), my grandfather Biagio Filippo (who perished in World War II in the Alpini), and Zio Alberino (who died in the United States).  Zia Maria married Iezzi.  Zia L. married Fiore Generosi, son of Giuseppe Generosi (a foundling from Teramo) and Maria Di Gregorio.  Alberino married another Farindolese who he brought to America, Gabriella Perilli, daughter of Angelo Perilli and Regina Colangelo.

After the birth of my grandfather, my great grandfather came to America.  The previous post about his travel to America, Naturalization and time here can be found at this previous post: On this day in 1923….

I believe my great grandfather looked like this when he became a citizen of the United States:

grandpop

I don’t care what anybody says but when I do a quick double-take, my brother resembles this photo, sans mustache.  When his passport from 1929 becomes public record in a few years, we should have another young photo of him.

Cesidio’s Ancestry

When I started genealogy, someone in my family said to me, “The Marcellas have been in Farindola for centuries.”  It is simply true.  I have traced back directly to Donato Marcella (my 6th great grandfather), born around 1700 in my paternal line who was likely born in Farindola because I still have not found Marcellas born in any neighboring Pescara towns.

DonatoMarcella

Donato may be the son of Domenico based on the number of Domenico Marcellas that were alive at the same time as my 5th great grandfather Domenico.  I think the wife of Donato Marcella may have been Domenica Cervo.  Unfortunately, I have only found one record that says the mother of Donato Marcella’s daughter was named Domenica Cervo, and that is on the death record of one Giustina Marcella, #110 Morti 1816, the widow of Mattia Macrini.  This is the link to her death at Antenati.

 

CesidioTree.PNG
This tree is public on Ancestry.com

 

Through what is available on Antenati in Pescara, the earliest baptismal record I could find of any related Marcella in our tree was from Anna Saveria Marcella, sister of my 4th great grandfather Giuseppe Antonio Marcella, and is from her 1818 marriage to Vito Antonio Di Vico.  Her baptismal extract is from 1773 and can be viewed at this link on Antenati.  You can see her grandparents are listed as Donato (Marcella) and Giacinto (Ferri).

The earliest record I could find of a Marcella being born in frazione Case Bruciate was the brother of my 3rd great grandfather, Massimo Nicola Marcella, named Vincenzo, who was born there on April 2, 1812.  Vincenzo’s birth record can be viewed here from Antenati on the right and continues to the next page.  Massimo Nicola married Maria Carolina Colangeli and they moved to frazione Trosciano and then back to frazione Case Bruciate.  It surprised me they lived in Trosciano, so perhaps any Marcellas there are relations of the Marcellas in Case Bruciate.

The Marcellas were farmers while their wives were filatrici (spinners) and levatrici (midwives).  There was a branch of Marcellas in Farindola in the late 1700s and first half of the 1800s that were falegnami (carpenters).  I have not been able to establish a connection between the contadini (farmers) and falegnami, even though they appeared in the same civil records as witnesses to each other’s life events.

Cesidio’s mother’s ancestry

 

penne
Penne, Pescara

 

While Elisabetta Rossi was born in Baccuco (Arsita, Teramo), her father Giuseppe Antonio Rossi was born in Penne, and her mother, Anna Antonia Ricci, was born in Castiglione Messer Raimondo, Teramo.  However, all of Elisabetta Rossi’s grandparents were born in Penne and as you can see in Cesidio’s pedigree chart posted above, the tree is filled out to at least 6th great grandparents in most lines, and goes back further than can be pictured in one little snipping tool insert.  Elisabetta also descended from filatrici from Penne and most of the males I found in her lines were literate.  Penne, if I may compliment them, kept impeccable records and I am glad all of these records are available on Antenati.

A note about the Sciarras

Can you see Baldassare Sciarra in the pedigree posted above?  He is the 2nd great grandfather of Cesidio,  He was born in Fara San Martino, Chieti.  He was a lanaro, which meant he worked with wool, and/or was a merchant of wool.  Because Baldassare brought the surname Sciarra to Farindola, I am almost positive all of the Sciarra from Farindola today descend from him.  He married a Farindolese, Angela Gabriele Dell’Orso.  She was the daughter of Cinziarosa.

 

Sources:

United States Naturalizations

United States Social Security Deaths

Find-A-Grave

Arhives of Teramo (for military documents)

Archives of Pescara (Antenati.San.Beneculturali.com)

Comune di Farindola Anagrafe (our Colangeli cousin)

Zia C. in Canada

P. D’Angelo in Penne that assists with the Penne ancestry

Coming: The anniversary of the marriage of Cesidio Marcell and Serafina Merlenghi

Send me a message if you need an invitation to the tree on Ancestry.

cinziarosagenealogy@comcast.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Today’s Anniversary ~ Maria Michela Cirone and Cesidio Merlenghi

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Farindola – Today is the 120th wedding anniversary of Maria Michela Cirone and Cesidio Merlenghi.  Who are they?  They are the parents of my great grandmother Serafina Merlenghi.

Maria Michela Cirone was born in 1864 in Farindola and was the daughter of Antonio Cirone and Serafina Iannascoli.  Because my great grandmother was the oldest daughter, she was named after her maternal grandmother Serafina Iannascoli.

 

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#9 Matrimonio, 1887 (first signature is Merlenghi Cesidio)

 

Cesidio Merlenghi was born at Fiano, Farindola in 1856 and was the son of Angelo Merlenghi and Maria Carmina Cirone.  Everyone on the marriage record was born in Farindola.  If you are reading this you may be wondering if Cesidio and Maria Michela were related because they both had a parent with the surname Cirone.  Unless they are 5th cousins or lower, they are not related.  I traced back behind Cesidio and Maria Michela four more generations and found no connections between these Cirone families.  In Cesidio’s mother’s ancestry, I traced back 5 more generations to a man that would be my 7th great grandfather named Annunzio Cirone and he would have been born about 1700 or earlier.  Maybe one day someone will trace all of the different Cirone families in Farindola.

I wanted to find a photo of Fiano where Cesidio was born.  I could only find it on a map.  So you see it is on the side of Farindola that is in current day Gran Sasso e Monti della Laga National Park.  I assume it is mountainous or forested.  Comments welcome.

 

fiano-ii
Location of Fiano

 

Cesidio Merlenghi’s ancestors, going all the way back to at least my 7th great grandparents were born in Farindola.  The exception is Cesidio’s great grandmother, a midwife, named Maria Domenica Di Costanzo who was born in nearby Penne.  Maria Michela Cirone also had a great grandparent born in another town.  Her great grandfather Domenico Lorenzo Salvitti, was born in Fara San Martino, Chieti.  The surname is still in both Fara San Martino and Farindola today.  Domenico Lorenzo’s nephew Donato Salvitti eventually became the Mayor of Farindola.

Maria Michela and Cesidio had at least 6 children.  For more on the Merlenghi and Cirone, please read this older post.

-A

cinziarosagenealogy@comcast.net

Today’s Anniversary ~ Angela Maria Di Massimo and Antonio Massei

 

san-nicola-di-bari
San Nicola di Bari, Farindola

 

Farindola, Pescara ~ Today is the 126th anniversary of the marriage of Angela Maria Di Massimo and Antonio Massei.  Who are they?  They are the parents of Maria Luigia Massei, my great grandmother.

Angela Maria Di Massimo was born in 1871 in Macchie, Farindola and was the daughter of Donato Di Massimo and Anna Maria Domenica Cacciatore.  Antonio Massei was born in 1864 in Farindola and was the twin of Nicola Massei.  He and his twin were both born in the 23rd hour of February 18, 1864 to Costantino Massei and Rosa Antonia Pompili.  There is no mention on their birth records who was born first, but Nicola’s birth was placed before Antonio’s in the birth register in Farindola.

masseidimassimo
#1 Matrimoni 1891, Farindola

 

Everyone on the marriage document, except Anna Domenica Cacciatore, was born in Farindola. She was born in Penne.  Antonio Massei signed his name at the bottom of the marriage document.  Because the transfer above is kind of on the weak-side, you can view their marriage online here at Antenati.  You can view the rest of their marriage documents here on Antenati.

My great grandmother’s parents had at least 5 children.  Their oldest, Francesca, married Raffaele Cirone and died in Farindola in 1977.  Their oldest son Gennaro died in Penne in 1975.  We already know Luigia Maria married Paolo Di Francesco.  Another son was named Plinio.

Finally, one of their sons was named Paolo and he married Maria Nicoletta Iezzi, also from Farindola.  Paolo came to the United States in 1920, first coming to Pennsylvania, and then making his permanent residence in New Jersey where some of Paolo’s and Maria Nicoletta Iezzi’s descendants live today.

Angela Maria Di Massimo died in 1927 in Farindola at age 55, while Antonio Massei lived until at least 1928  where the online records stop.

I would love to hear from other Massei descendants in America even if they descend from Clemente Massei and are living in New Jersey!

Drop me a line…cinziarosagenealogy@comcast.net

-A

 

Christmas and Antenati

If it is not too much to ask, I would like Babbo Natale or La Befana to put more Campania records on Antenati San Beniculturali, for Sinterklaas to put more German Lutheran records on Archion.de, and for the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services to find Angelo’s Special Inquiry Hearing case file.  I would love to find those missing marriage documents in Caserta and see the military documents relating to Francesco Antonio Ferraro!

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From Antenati: First page of the 1814 marriage of Natale Iannascoli and Maria Giuseppa Salvitti from Farindola, Pescara, my 4th great grandparents. His marriage documents told me that he was born on Christmas – like his name implies.  Her marriage documents told me her father was born in Fara San Martino, Chieti.

Last year I heard ALL of Napoli would be on Antenati this year.  HA!  Or should I say “ho ho ho!” Nola, Caserta, Salerno, Chieti, Novara how I wish you were on Antenati too!

Antenati is the Italian Archives record repository.  It translates as “Ancestors.”  It is free.  The images are downloadable and clearer than microfilm and of course, enlargeable.  Once you have the name of the province your ancestor came from, you can check to see if the archives from that province have been added to Antenati by the Italians.  Eventually Italy will have all archives uploaded to the website.  The newest added archives are mentioned at the bottom of their homepage under “latest news” or on the news button at the top of the page.  And oh YES, on that homepage, if you cannot read Italian, click the Union Jack in the upper left corner!

There are three ways to take you to the archives to look at the civil records.  Let me explain the first way.  You can click Regions and Sources on the homepage.  See the picture below.  I selected Regions and Sources and this is the page it took me to:  Regions and Sources (Territorio e le fonte)

verbania-piemonte

When I get to this page I clicked on the map of Italy in the Piemonte Region at the top of the boot to see if Verbania records have been added.  I got the message that the “images not yet available” for this province.  But by hitting Verbania, or any other province listed for Piemonte, Antenati gave me the email address of their archives.  Note the three tabs that can be clicked at the bottom of the left half of the image for Information, Civil State, and Military drafts.  Important information is listed telling a researcher what is available and where it is available if it is not online.  If I am checking for Torino, look at all of the information it gave to me, expecially on how to find military records in English:

torinoTorino even has a fourth tab where links for other sources can be found.  Very, very nice Torino researchers.  I am jealous!  If I was looking for records in Torino on Antenati I would hit “Browse civil state records.”

The second way to get to where I want to browse records of my ancestors is by selecting the blue wording “State Archives” on the home page.  I would be taken to a page listing all of the State Archives available for browsing on Antenati, to this page.  One does not need to go to the first option if they know their archives are on Antenati.  I like this way most of the time because I know that I am usually heading to the Archives of the Province of Pescara.  At this point now, if looking at the records on Antenati, English is of no use.  All of the browsing I do in the records on this website will be in Italian.

After I hit my selection of “Archivio di Stato di Pescara” I am taken to a page that looks like this:

archivioMost state archives on Antenati have this same setup or will have the same setup once all civil records are added to Antenati.*  In Pescara, and other states that were once part of the Kingdom of Naples, the years for each designation of records listed above is this:

Stato Civile Napoleonico: 1809-1815

Stato Civile della Restaurazione: 1816-1860

Stato Civile Italiano: 1861-1930ish (note that birth records won’t go past 1910 because of privacy laws)

In some of the northern states, the Napoleonic records start earlier. Indexes made by the town scribe for each year of records are either at the beginning or end of the records in Pescara.  But remember if you are searching the 1809 records in Pescara, there are not many indexes in any of the record batches.  Town officials didn’t keep them yet. You will have to read each record to look for your ancestor.  If you are searching a town with indexes for 1809 in Pescara you are very lucky.

After you decide what time period to search you are taken to an alphabetical listing of all of the communes in that archives.  From there you are taken to the list of records available for the commune.

*Some archives on Antenati have church records in the database.  I think I saw one the other day going back to the 1400s.  The Archives of Rome do not resemble the Pescara setup above either.  The Comune of Naples is setup by its quarters and contains few indexes.

The Third Way to Access the Database’s Records:

At the home page, at the top you could have clicked “Browse.”  Don’t worry, just hit the Union Jack in the top right corner again if the site has reverted back to Italian. It would have taken you to a page that looks like this:

browse

The only thing you need to fill out is the place and the year fields.  Hit “Search.”  After a few searching moments a page will appear with the archival holdings available in the database.  To browse the desired records you will need to hit the word “Apri” on the left next to the records.  This way has the same desired affect as the first method I told you about.  Once again, everything beyond the word “apri” will be in Italian.

The final feature of the website to tell you about is the “Browse Names” option on the home page.  If you click that option on the homepage you will be taken to this page where you can search indexes done by volunteers.  Below is an image of the page.

FindNames.PNG

The area pointed out in red tells you which archives on Antenati have been already been indexed.  The fields are self-explanatory but I give a warning.  Only a few archives have been indexed so far AND in Pescara, particularly in Penne and Farindola, the indexes aren’t complete.  One should search for their ancestors B/M/D the old fashioned way- by browsing the indexes done by the town officials yearly at the beginning or end of each year of records.

This is a quick example:  I typed in my great grandmother’s last name in the Cognome field: Merlenghi.  I know she was born in Farindola so I put that in the field for place (Comune/Localita).  I decided to not fill in anything else because Farindola is small and I hit search.  She is right at the top of names as you can see below.

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I hit “Apri” under the names of her parents. It takes me to this page and there is her birth record!

One more tip when searching in Italian civil records:  The additional marriage documents you need in the allegati or processetti are numbered and match the same number at the top of the marriage act.  Good luck!

Don’t forget to check out their pages of other helpful research links. Or the Family Stories page.  It appears to already have some beefy audiovisual aids for those with Abruzzese ancestry like me.

 

abruzzese-zampognari2
Traditional mountain zampognari from Abruzzo

 

 

Have a wonderful Natale and here is hoping you find that elusive, archaic Italian record this year!  Maybe this Christmas post will help someone find it or hundreds of them like me ~~~~~  Buon Natale!

cinziarosagenealogy@comcast.net

babbonatale