Today’s Wedding Anniversary: Biagio Di Francesco and Marianna Di Pendima

san-nicola-di-bari

Farindola~~June 17, 1888.  On this day in 1888 my great great grandparents Biagio Di Francesco and Marianna Di Pendima were married in Farindola, Pescara.  They were both contadini and the parents of my great grandfather Paolo Di Francesco.

Biagio was born on January 15, 1866 in Trosciano, Farindola to Luigi Di Francesco and Anna Emidia Lucerini.  His birth record starts at the bottom of this page. Both of his parents were born in Farindola.   Marianna was born on March 17, 1868 in Cupoli, Farindola to Carlo Di Pentima from Via Piana, Pianella and Nicola Antonia (di) Giansante from Rione del San Giovanni, Penne.  Marianna’s birth.

The witnesses to their marriage were Clemente de Bernardinis, 43, Secretary (Municipal), and Domenico Ammazalorzco, 48, Country Guard (Municipal).

Follow this link to their marriage document.

Follow this link to their marriage allegati.

Biagio and Marianna welcomed their first child, Filomena, a little less than 9 months later.  She died in infancy.  Using other Farindola records on Antenati, I found that they went on to have at least 5 more children, and a stillborn.  One son, named Zopito, emigrated to Canada.  A daughter named Vincenza was born in 1890 and died in Farindola in 1954.

A son named Alfonso was born in 1892 and was a soldier in the 156 Regiment during World War 1 and died on August 12, 1915 from wounds received at Monte Cappuccio at the Second Battle of the Isonzo.  His death record was on Antenati here because his parents requested information on their son from the Italian Army.  In 1917, his military death record was sent from Rome to his parents and filed in the town records which I was able to access on Antenati.

 

alfonso.PNG
from Cadutigrandeguerra.it

 

My great grandfather Paolo Di Francesco was born in 1897.  On July 15, 1915, he was called to military service in World War I and served in the 30th Artillery Regiment of the Infrantry.  He was released from service in 1919.  He and his future wife Luigia Maria Massei named a son Alfonso.

Biagio and Marianna had a son named Luigi who was born in 1899.  He died in 1923 shortly after marrying Maria Vinci.  Biagio died in 1923 as well at 29 Via Rossetti, Farindola.  His death record is here.  Marianna Di Pendima lived at least until 1928 because I have not located her death record in Farindola.

A Bit About the Parents of Marianna Di Pendima

Marianna’s mother Nicola Antonia (di) Giansante’s grandparents were Saverio Di Giansante and Domenica Andreoli.  Saverio could write, and I have his signature from his son’s wedding record in Penne.  They were contadini as well.

Saverios sig

Saverio died in Penne but was born in Carpineto della Nora, Pescara, which is a few miles south of Farindola.  Saverio’s death. Saverio and Domenica have a lot of descendants researching them and I run into more and more people wondering if that is why our DNA matches, etc.  They are only in my tree once but in my Canadian cousins’ tree twice!  As I am typing this I am asking myself why I have not yet researched Carpineto della Nora on Antenati!

Marianna’s father Carlo Di Pentima was born in Pianella and was a contadino.  Carlo’s birth is on the left. Pianella is a few miles southeast of Farindola.  In Pianella, the surname is spelled with a ‘t’ and not the ‘d’ they gave it in Farindola.  I had to keep that in mind when I was looking at indexes.   I have been researching Pianella the past week and the town seems larger than Farindola. In the late 1700s Pianella had a colony of Albanians according to the Farindola history I found on this Farindolesi’s website.  I love that website.

 

Paolo.PNG
Paolo Di Francesco, Biagio and Marianna’s son

 

The research continues…Wouldn’t it be something if I found an Albanian surname in my tree?

Sources: Antenati, Cadutigrandeguerra.it, Archivio di Stato di Teramo, Zia C.

cinziarosagenealogy@comcast.net

 

 

 

 

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In Which My AncestryDNA is Starting to Make Sense

My siblings love to hear what my DNA results are but they don’t want to get to get tested even though Ancestry keeps having sales.  I choose not to broadcast my results anymore because if they don’t want to know why my test doesn’t show that I am not 100% European and shows 12% something else, then, never mind.  Nor will I tell them how much Scandinavian or Iberian came up.  I do know that I don’t have South Asian DNA but someone we are related to does and that is likely a sign of Roma ancestry in that person.

I was contacted recently by a user with a shared match that had an adoptee in their ancestry.  So I have been looking more closely at my DNA on Ancestry.  I am still learning how to use AncestryDNA, and after a year and a half, by looking at my matches and grouping them together with my shared matches by surnames and birthplaces, I know for sure that I am related to my mother, because I match her first cousin and second cousins on both sides of her family, and I am also related to my father because of the Cirone  and Cacciatore matches.

Ancestry started something new this past spring called “Genetic Communities” in an effort, no doubt, to sell more DNA tests.  Genetic Communities are “groups of AncestryDNA customers who are connected… most likely because they descend from a population of common ancestors…For example some trace their roots back to groups of people who were isolated geographically…”  Source:  ANCESTRY.COM.

So, are you ready for my two genetic communities?   Here is my first:

genetic community
Italians in Umbria, Abruzzo & Molise

Here is the closeup:

dna close-up.PNG

My second genetic community is…

dun

dunnn

dunnnnnnnnnnnnnn…..

Southern Italians in which I have 35 DNA matches.

Surprised by either one?  No?  Then AncestryDNA got something right because the most recent immigrants in my tree were:  a parent from Abruzzo and a great grandparent from Campania.  Or maybe the Abruzzese and Campanian genetic makeup are similar?  I don’t know.  12.5% DNA from my Campanian great grandparent is a small amount to put me in the Southern Italian community that easily.  In case you are interested, the other people in the family that had DNA tests at Ancestry (and my family reading this knows who those people are) are not showing up in either of these Italian Genetic Communities.

-pace

cinziarosagenealogy@comcast.net