Immigrant #27 ~ Great Grand Aunt Giovania Ferraro ~ What Happened to You?

My great grandfather Carmine Ferraro had 5 siblings and they all immigrated to the United States.  Unfortunately, there is very little known about his last sibling Giovania, his youngest.  At present, Giovania is only found in two records in America.  The first is in the 1905 New York State Census by name and age, and the second is in the 1932 Leavenworth prison file as a reference.  There is no oral history on this sibling either.

Giovania was not on the 1904 passenger manifest of her mother and sisters.  Since her mother and sisters were detained, the tally of detained and released passengers at the end of the roll of records from the National Archives specifically divulges 3 children over the age of 1 were released with mother Filomena Napolitano.  Giovania would have been about 14 at that time.  I plainly do not know when Giovania got here.  I cannot figure out how or with whom Giovania came to America period.

In 1905, Giovania was living in Brooklyn with her three sisters and parents, according to the New York State Census.  That record showed she was born in Italy, 15 years old, and did housework.  This is the only record I ever found that gave an idea of her name and an approximate year of birth. Ancestry indexers incorrectly transcribed her name as Guarania!  

 

GiovaniaCensus1905
Giovania is at the bottom.

 

Carmine’s Leavenworth prison file references the fact, in his social interview, that he was 1 of 6 children and only 4 were alive.  The current residence of each of his siblings was listed.  By my research, Angela Maria Ferraro Valerioti was deceased.  Giovania Ferraro had to have been the other deceased sibling.

I could not find Giovania in the New York City Municipal death index, nor anywhere in Columbus, Ohio where parents Angelo Ferraro and Filomena Napolitano had moved by 1907.   She would only have been about 17 at that point.  To give you my honest opinion, I think her first or last name was corrupted on an American record, possibly in the above census, and any further proof of her in the United States may be impossible right now until more records become available.  I hope I am wrong about the corruption of her name.  Technically her name should be Giovanna, right?

I have no idea why Giovania would not be on any passenger manifest.  She definitely didn’t come to America with her father Angelo in 1903.  Also, it just is not possible for me to find her birth record in Naples at this time since 1) I don’t know her birthday and can’t write to Naples for it without it; and 2) Births of the Commune of Naples post 1865 are not online anywhere for researchers.

Could she have gone by a different first name?  Yes, and obviously the common last name poses some search issues as well.  Giovania, what happened to you?

Giovania is the last of Carmine’s siblings whose stories were told here.  The rest can be found in these previous posts:

Immigrant #2: Angela Maria Ferraro Valerioti – Mother of a Renowned NYC Investigator and a NYC Refuse Company President

Immigrant #5 ~ The Disappearing Antonio Ferraro and More on Antonio Ferraro here

Immigrant #23 ~ Great Grand Aunt Elena Ferraro Scarnecchia

Immigrant #26 Gelsomina Ferraro Ciocco ~ Pasta Company Treasurer and Mother of Biostatistician Dr. Antonio Ciocco

 

Update on Available Italian Genealogical Records

As of 11:00 am on August 26th, 2017, any available genealogical records from Italy (save for the Heinzen’s ancestors, the Gentinetta of Bognanco, and Naples births post 1865 for Carmine’s siblings) that I need to access to research either Italian side of my tree will no longer have to be ordered on microfilm!  Any records that aren’t on Antenati San Beniculturali from Italy were made available for viewing on the Family Search website.  Some of those can only be viewed at a Latter Day Saints Center until Antenati in Italy publishes them for viewing online worldwide.  This includes Castiglione Messer Raimondo and Castelli in Teramo, Fara San Martino in Chieti, Nola and Sirico in Napoli, and San Felice a Cancello/Sei Casali d’Arienzo and San Prisco in Caserta.  Farindola and all of Pescara have been on Antenati for years and is accessible in every home.  Since Nola is now available to help identify more ancestors there, I have a feeling that part of the tree will grow to aid in finding relatives of Filomena Napolitano in America.  

Sources:

Ellis Island Passenger Manifests

NY State Census of 1905

Federal records obtained from the National Archives in Kansas

Upcoming Immigrants:

More in the Leies – Bold branch, including the Leies family that went to New York City and the Leies family that beat all of the others here by arriving in 1848.  The immigrants are about halfway complete.

This blog just turned 2!  Thank you readers!

 

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