Immigrants 21 and 22 ~ Fritz’s brothers Eduard Eckebrecht of the 4th Cavalry Regiment and Heinrich Ferdinand Christoph Eckebrecht a Druggist

My great great grandfather Fritz Eckebrecht had 5 siblings.  Carl, Auguste, Wilhelm, Heinrich Ferdinand, and Eduard.  His brothers Edward and Henry Ferdinand arrived in New York City on May 25, 1866 aboard the Jennie with him.  Edward was the baby of the family.  You can see him on the far left of this photo taken sometime between 1868 and 1875.  Henry is likely the tallest pictured in the middle back OR the gentleman on the far right.

Eckebrechtsabt1872

Edward Eckebrecht

Edward was born in 1859 in Schwarzburg, Thuringia.  He was only 6 or 7 when he came to America with his family.  He looks very young in the above photo!  By 1880, he was living with his brother Wilhelm and working as a harness maker because his mother Marie Louise, seated above – middle, was already deceased.  His father Quirinus, seated above, was living with his oldest son Carl.  On September 27, 1880, at the age of 21, Edward enlisted in the United States Army in St. Louis, Missouri.  His profession was recorded as harness maker and he was listed as 5’5″, having blue eyes, light hair, and possessing a light complexion.  He was put into the cavalry, naturally, because he was a harness maker.  Of the 41 enlistments on the page I found him, he was 1 of 19 men born outside the United States.

Edward Eckebrecht.PNG

Edward was part of a famous regiment – the 4th Cavalry Regiment, Company B.  Edward would have enlisted at the time the United States was engaged in various struggles with Native American resistance in the West.  In fact, Edward enlisted in the 4th Cavalry Regiment at the time they had been sent to Colorado to “subdue” the Utes and then to Arizona to “subdue” the Apache. In Company B he would have served directly under then Colonel Ranald S. McKenzie, aka “Bad Hand/No Finger Chief”.  In October, the 4th Cavalry under MacKenzie was sent to New Mexico to “subdue” White Mountain Apaches, Jicarilla Apaches, Navajos, and Mescaleros. Edward deserted the United States Military on May 5, 1881.  About 1/3 of the page of enlistments where I located his name had deserted.

I find it incredibly interesting this Eckebrecht tale was lost to my side of the Eckebrecht family considering the fact that about ten years earlier his brother, my great great grandfather Fritz, was a “captive” of the Comanche in Texas. Uncle John had doubts about the word “captive” too.  See: The Multi-Faceted Life Of Fred Eckebrecht 1848-1920  If Fritz was a “captive” I never understood how he was allowed to visit a German family for Sunday dinner once a week.  Don’t forget the tale about our Fritz… during a civil case before a judge he spoke with his thick German accent.  A lawyer told him to speak more clearly – more “real American.”  Fritz replied in Comanche.  The lawyer asked him what he had said.  Fritz said, “That was real American, from the people who were here before we came…”

Nobody views desertion positively, right?  Since Edward was part of a military unit that at that time was forcing the Native Americans to reservations, there is no fault in his desertion…  That being said, unless the digging pans out with the potential brother of Johann Schuttler, a.k.a. “The Gigantic Brick Wall” ancestor, Edward was the first of the first in the Ferraro ancestry that served in any capacity in the United States Military.*  Edward Eckebrecht was an immigrant that enlisted to serve his new country.  He deserted for a reason we will probably never know.

*My 3rd great grandfather Johann “The Gigantic Brick Wall” Schuttler made wagons for the Union Army but never served. I am on the trail of a potential close relation to him that served in the Civil War for Illinois as a wagoner.

After he left the army, Edward married Mary Ruebhausen, a German-American.  They had two children:  Loretta and Elmer. By 1900 Edward was a machine engineer for a bank. He had a stepdaughter through that marriage – Sophie Eckebrecht.  Sophie married Gerald Brown.  Edward died in 1926 in Chicago.

Henry Ferdinand Eckebrecht

Researching Fritz’s brother Henry Ferdinand Eckebrecht gave me a hint about the migration of the Eckebrecht family to Chicago.  I always thought the Eckebrechts stopped off somewhere between arriving in NYC in 1866 and appearing in Chicago on the 1870 census.  I found the confirmation of Henry Ferdinand in the St. Paul’s First Lutheran Church in Chicago with a date of April 5, 1868.  So Quirinus and Louise Eckebrecht already had the family in Chicago by 1868.  I believe at this point that our Fritz was wandering around the Post-War South picking crops.

Henry Ferdinand was in the medical profession, the only sibling of Fritz that didn’t work in a laboring capacity.  He was a pharmacist. In fact, he was comfortable enough in the 1900 census to have a servant.  Henry Ferdinand married a German-American born in Wisconsin named Theresa Louise Engleman.  They had three children:  Henry Frederick, Theresa, and Albert.  Henry Ferdinand has many descendants on the West Coast today. Below is a photo of his son Henry Frederick that I retrieved from his Seaman’s Certificate application on Ancestry from 1918.

HFEckebrecht
Henry Frederick Eckebrecht, 1918

 

Fritz has one sibling left.  Wilhelm.  He will be featured later in the year.  Follow this link to read about his brother Carl.  Follow this link to read about his sister Auguste.

Researching Edward Eckebrecht was a surprise for me.  You have to read everything on a military record!  I have not found any biological descendants of Edward alive after 1920.  I would like to research more about Edward’s time in the United States Army to find out what his Company did while he served. 

Sources:

New York Passenger Lists

Chicago City Directories

United States Federal Censuses

Chicago Birth, Marriage, and Death Indexes

United States Social Security Death Index

Chicago 1892 Voter Registration

National Archives, U.S. Army Register of Enlistments

Newspapers.com

Father John G. Leies (Uncle John)

St. Paul’s First Lutheran, Chicago

Wikipedia – Ranald S. MacKenzie

Wikipedia – 4th Cavalry Regiment

 

Coming: Carmine’s sister Elena Ferraro Scarnecchia.

I do plan to do write-ups on the Gerbing immigrants (the family of my third great grandmother.) Her siblings had huge families, who had huge families, who are now allover the country.  They may likely come last.

-cinziarosagenealogy@comcast.net

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s